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Atlantic-sys

Which 3d Engine to choose for Skyrim clone?

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Hi, the question is which 3D Engine should i choose to make an awesome graphics like in Skyrim game where everything is moving (leaves, trees, grass etc.)open area? Now i have only very costly engines like Chrome 3D 4(? usd), Cryengine 3(? usd), Unigine(25000 usd). With free we have OGRE and Irrlicht but i don`t know if they will be suitable for this level of graphics. Also we have Essenthel(which is purely documentated) and C4(which have a ploblem with open areas). Budget is 1000 usd. Thanks.
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isn't there a free sdk version of the cryengine? I'd think it's best for that kind of game, as FarCry + crysis1 were open sandbox games, kind of what you'd need for skyrim.
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[quote name='Atlantic-sys' timestamp='1343392649' post='4963615']
Hi, the question is which 3D Engine should i choose to make an awesome graphics like in Skyrim game where everything is moving (leaves, trees, grass etc.)open area? Now i have only very costly engines like Chrome 3D 4(? usd), Cryengine 3(? usd), Unigine(25000 usd). With free we have OGRE and Irrlicht but i don`t know if they will be suitable for this level of graphics. Also we have Essenthel(which is purely documentated) and C4(which have a ploblem with open areas). Budget is 1000 usd. Thanks.
[/quote]

CryEngine3 can be had at $0 + 20% of revenue.

Now the big problem, $1000 is nothing, it gets you around 10-20 hours worth of labor from a skilled developer/artist, the main thing you need to make a game with good graphics is.. believe it or not: good graphics and for a game like Skyrim you need alot of it, you shouldn't worry about what engine you're using it is not that relevant(atleast not if your goal is to match skyrim quality wise as its graphics engine is fairly basic by todays standards and performance wise a modern PC can handle a game such as that even with a less than optimal engine (besides, its highly unlikely that you'll finish a game of that scale within 5 years so you can pretty much expect all your potential players to have machines that are significantly better than the top of the line rigs of today)), you should worry about finding a few good artists willing to put several years of unpaid full-time work into your game though, that will be your biggest challenge.
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[quote name='clashie' timestamp='1343430378' post='4963795']
Why not just mod Skyrim? The base is there and you have everything you need to make a completely new game.
[/quote]

Seconded.
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[quote name='JWalsh' timestamp='1343442560' post='4963840']The good news is that most all of this is ran on your GPU using various real-time shader techniques. This means that these advanced techniques will work with nearly any graphics engine, as once the vertices hit your hardware, the "graphics engine" has almost no impact on what's possible. The bad news is that most of this stuff requires fairly sophisticated math skills. Now, you may be saying "Yeah! That's all the stuff I want my graphics engine to do for me. I just want to provide it with models and adjust a few nobs and it looks fantastic" to which I say, if you're looking for a free graphics engine that supports these things out-of-the-box with no work on your part, you're going to be disappointed.[/quote]
Sorry If I'm wrong but when I took a look at UDK(I think cyrengine sdk is similar too) It looked very much like, input your models and textures, Put them in the world and turn a few knobs and the engine makes magic happen. Ofcourse even if the engine has all kinds of cool GFX effects built in that you can turn on by turning a knob you can't make an awesomely good looking game without good models, textures and world desings that match in art style. Then you have to find the right position for every knob. Write the code to handle your game logic(physics are already in the engine) and you are done. You most likely need a team of atleast 10+ and a few years to make anything remotely skyrimish. But with enough manpower and time you can make it without ever touching any code that has anything to do with drawing things on the screen.

That is the whole point of those game development kits. You don't have to be a master level coder and you still can make something awesome. Not neccessarily triple-A awesome but awesome non the less.
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[quote name='PunCrathod' timestamp='1343471054' post='4963906']
Sorry If I'm wrong but when I took a look at UDK(I think cyrengine sdk is similar too) It looked very much like, input your models and textures, Put them in the world and turn a few knobs and the engine makes magic happen. Ofcourse even if the engine has all kinds of cool GFX effects built in that you can turn on by turning a knob you can't make an awesomely good looking game without good models, textures and world desings that match in art style. Then you have to find the right position for every knob. Write the code to handle your game logic(physics are already in the engine) and you are done. You most likely need a team of atleast 10+ and a few years to make anything remotely skyrimish. But with enough manpower and time you can make it without ever touching any code that has anything to do with drawing things on the screen.

That is the whole point of those game development kits. You don't have to be a master level coder and you still can make something awesome. Not neccessarily triple-A awesome but awesome non the less.
[/quote]

True. UDK, like other engines are more "turn the nob and get great graphics", but the UDK is only free for educational & non-commercial use. For any internal applications it's $2,500 per developer, per year. so if you make an internal application that takes 4 developers, after 5 years in use you've paid Epic $50,000.

If you develop a commercial application to distribute, it's free for the first $50,000 of revenue, and then 25% of your profit above that. So if you do make the next Skyrim, and your game goes platinum, a full 1/4 of your profit goes to Epic. That can range from 10's of thousands, to MILLIONS of dollars in royalty fees. The point is, I said ....

[quote name='JWalsh' timestamp='1343442560' post='4963840']
if you're looking for a free graphics engine that supports these things out-of-the-box with no work on your part, you're going to be disappointed.
[/quote]

...and the UDK isn't really free. In fact, the more successful your game is, the more expensive it becomes.
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[quote name='dragon.R' timestamp='1343637657' post='4964425']
The engine whitch Skyrim used seems to be GameBryo
[/quote]

Gamebryo was used in Oblivion if I recall correctly, Skyrim uses an in-house engine I believe, something called the 'Creation Engine'
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It's still built on their older Gamebryo engine. They just changed enough that it's distinct from their older Gamebryo, adding better lighting and such which it desperately needed.

If you wanna spend $1k on a game, spend $1k on a game rather than 1/10000th of a game :P
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[url="http://www.esenthel.com/?id=overview"]Esenthel engine[/url] is purposed for MMO-scale projects, and it's cheap for indie developers.

It's also cross-platform.
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