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mk.jr.fan

What engine would be good to make 2d games?

19 posts in this topic

Hi I am trying to develop a game for project at school and wanted to make a 2d platformer but i am not sure what to use in order to make it. I have already did some programming in a program called gamemaker which basically taught me the logic behind coding for a game. But i want to move far away from that and use a more powerful engine or language. I have begun learning java and will be taking a class in javascript. Unity3d is also another options that i have looked into but not really sure if i can make a 2d game out of that because it is a 3d engine.

Should I:
try to look for a way to make a 2d game in Unity?
or try to look for libraries for java or javascript that will help me make a 2d game?

Thanks for the help!
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Unfortunately, this question can really only be answered by you, since it depends on many things, such as your comfort level and available time for learning programming, specific goals, type of 2d games you are interested in developing, etc.

However, to clarifty one point, you can definitely make 2d games in Unity - in fact, there is an entire tutorial available on their site for making a 2d platformer. My suggestion is run through that tutorial and see what you think.
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Plain and simple: you can make a 2D game with any engine. (correct me if I'm wrong of course)
Every time i see a thread like this it always ends in "You can use any engine that's up to you."
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[quote name='Inuyashakagome16' timestamp='1343921266' post='4965555']
Plain and simple: you can make a 2D game with any engine. (correct me if I'm wrong of course)
[/quote]
Just use flat assets and a fixed camera angle, it will look like a 2d game more or less
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[quote name='laztrezort' timestamp='1343919090' post='4965540']
Unfortunately, this question can really only be answered by you, since it depends on many things, such as your comfort level and available time for learning programming, specific goals, type of 2d games you are interested in developing, etc.

However, to clarifty one point, you can definitely make 2d games in Unity - in fact, there is an entire tutorial available on their site for making a 2d platformer. My suggestion is run through that tutorial and see what you think.
[/quote]

i have (sorry for not explaining) but i would like to have it like 2d sprites. An example of the type of game i want to make is rayman origins.
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[quote name='6677' timestamp='1343922781' post='4965565']
[quote name='Inuyashakagome16' timestamp='1343921266' post='4965555']
Plain and simple: you can make a 2D game with any engine. (correct me if I'm wrong of course)
[/quote]
Just use flat assets and a fixed camera angle, it will look like a 2d game more or less
[/quote]

ok i will try and look it up Edited by mk.jr.fan
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Allegro is pretty simple to use (requires C coding) and has a good community ([url="http://www.allegro.cc/"]allegro.cc[/url]).
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A lot of folks are using C# / XML because of the wide Windows / Xbox support.
Quite a few folks like using Java, due to the portability.
Some folks like using Python / Pygame because of easy language.

It's all up to you. 2D games with sprites have been made in HTML / PHP / Jscript before.
Heck, due to the power of HTML5, many things are possible with that.

The #1 question you have to ask yourself is:
Do I feel comfortable with the language?

If you want to distribute your game, than portability comes into play, but just to code a 2D game, almost any language can be used.
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[quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1343938618' post='4965634']
C# / XML
[/quote]
Don't you mean C# with XNA

EDIT:
Someone downvotes me for making a simple correction, wtf Edited by 6677
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[quote name='kuramayoko10' timestamp='1343924221' post='4965576']
Just to make sure it is clear to you one thing: Java and Javascript are completely different languages.
They have similar names but their purpose and syntax are pretty different [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

About the 2D engine:
- I tried making a 2D game in Unity3D but it was not so nice.
- You would have to use a 2D framework (as a plugin in Unity) to help you. I used a free one ([url="http://www.wyrmtale.com/products/unity3d-components/orthello"]Orthello2D[/url]) but I didn't like it much. A lot of people recommended a paid one ([url="http://www.anbsoft.com/middleware/sm2/"]Sprite Manager[/url]) but I didn't want to risk buying one without knowing for sure it would fit my needs.
- Anyways you can find a good tutorial with the Orthello2D [url="http://www.rocket5studios.com/tutorials/make-a-2d-game-with-unity3d-using-only-free-tools-part-2/"]here[/url].

Hope this helps somehow [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
[/quote]

i think i will try Orthello2d. What was the problem with orthello?

Also when making your 2d game what went wrong? Edited by mk.jr.fan
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[quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1343938618' post='4965634']
A lot of folks are using C# / XML because of the wide Windows / Xbox support.
Quite a few folks like using Java, due to the portability.
Some folks like using Python / Pygame because of easy language.

It's all up to you. 2D games with sprites have been made in HTML / PHP / Jscript before.
Heck, due to the power of HTML5, many things are possible with that.

The #1 question you have to ask yourself is:
Do I feel comfortable with the language?

If you want to distribute your game, than portability comes into play, but just to code a 2D game, almost any language can be used.
[/quote]


The thing is that i am going to be learning javascript in school so i would probably become comfortable with it i just want to know if it is powerful enough to make games as big as limbo or have lighting effects like shadows.
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Right now there is a big hype about HTML5. Even HTML4 was suited to creating very basic games (with a little bit of CSS "cheating" to move stuff around and do animations), but with the new canvas, you seem to have a full-fledged drawing surface and API (no longer required to use CSS hacks). If you are indeed learning Javascript and not Java, then going the web route would make your game quite portable. A fun fact is that you can just put in your university's web page, no jsp hosting required, and all your friends will be able to play it, even on their tablets and phones. From what I've heard, the major problem is sound. For advanced effects, there is WebGL.

I've never used Unity, so I can't compare.
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I've recently started having a play around with Moai which is primarily for 2D games and I've been very impressed.
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[quote name='mk.jr.fan' timestamp='1344043251' post='4966002']
learning javascript in school so i would probably become comfortable with it i just want to know if it is powerful enough to make games as big as limbo or have lighting effects like shadows.
[/quote]
Just make sure your not confusing javascript and java. Javascript is an embedded language most commonly used in HTML web pages (I think this is the one your referring to). Java is a full programming language.

Javascript is not a very powerful language, its meant to be "bolted onto" something else for basic control of that. In most cases that's a web browser and it can be used to detect that the mouse has entered the area a button covers and then change the colour of the button. With HTML5's canvas element and javascript you can make a basic game, alot of CPU power would be lost just in moving 1 sprite though. Internet explorer doesn't seem to like canvas elements though, kinda just ignores them. Theres also webGL which is far more powerful than a canvas element on its own but much harder to use. Unfortunately few browsers support webGL, the webkit API itself does so any browser with webkit will most likely support webGL (chrome and safari are 2 examples that use webkit and support webGL, there is other work to be done though so there are webkit browsers that don't support it), I don't know if firefox does, internet explorer doesn't. Making a limbo clone through javascript and canvas would be a bit convoluted, through webGL would be slightly less convoluted but a bit harder, performance would still be less than desirable. Shadows would almost certainly not be possible without webGL.

Usually those sorts of browser games are done as either a flash object or java applet, minecraft for example is usually played as a standalone java program but there is a java applet playable in browser (link to free version thats played in browser: http://www.minecraft.net/classic/play). Only thing about using flash or java applets is that the web browser will require additional plugins and the user will have to have flash or java on their systems, not usually an issue anyway.
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[quote name='6677' timestamp='1344076238' post='4966077']
[quote name='mk.jr.fan' timestamp='1344043251' post='4966002']
learning javascript in school so i would probably become comfortable with it i just want to know if it is powerful enough to make games as big as limbo or have lighting effects like shadows.
[/quote]
Just make sure your not confusing javascript and java. Javascript is an embedded language most commonly used in HTML web pages (I think this is the one your referring to). Java is a full programming language.

Javascript is not a very powerful language, its meant to be "bolted onto" something else for basic control of that. In most cases that's a web browser and it can be used to detect that the mouse has entered the area a button covers and then change the colour of the button. With HTML5's canvas element and javascript you can make a basic game, alot of CPU power would be lost just in moving 1 sprite though. Internet explorer doesn't seem to like canvas elements though, kinda just ignores them. Theres also webGL which is far more powerful than a canvas element on its own but much harder to use. Unfortunately few browsers support webGL, the webkit API itself does so any browser with webkit will most likely support webGL (chrome and safari are 2 examples that use webkit and support webGL, there is other work to be done though so there are webkit browsers that don't support it), I don't know if firefox does, internet explorer doesn't. Making a limbo clone through javascript and canvas would be a bit convoluted, through webGL would be slightly less convoluted but a bit harder, performance would still be less than desirable. Shadows would almost certainly not be possible without webGL.

Usually those sorts of browser games are done as either a flash object or java applet, minecraft for example is usually played as a standalone java program but there is a java applet playable in browser (link to free version thats played in browser: [url="http://www.minecraft.net/classic/play"]http://www.minecraft.net/classic/play[/url]). Only thing about using flash or java applets is that the web browser will require additional plugins and the user will have to have flash or java on their systems, not usually an issue anyway.
[/quote]

but how can javascript be used in unity? if i try to code the game in javascript not by it self but with unity would it have less capabilities then coding in c#? or is it because it is "bolted onto" unity that it makes it it stronger?



[quote name='Monkan' timestamp='1344074417' post='4966075']
I've recently started having a play around with Moai which is primarily for 2D games and I've been very impressed.
[/quote]


what is moai? is it just a cloud storage? or do you just put your game on that cloud for people to use? Edited by mk.jr.fan
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Moai SDK is a platform for game development which uses the Lua scripting language.
Read the website for more info ( I do not personally use it ) [url="http://getmoai.com"]http://getmoai.com[/url]

Here is a tutorial if you wish to take a look at whats involved [url="http://getmoai.com/moai-platform-tutorials/moai-tutorials-bug-squisher.html"]http://getmoai.com/m...g-squisher.html[/url] Edited by Shippou
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[quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1344235073' post='4966575']
Moai SDK is a platform for game development which uses the Lua scripting language.
Read the website for more info ( I do not personally use it ) [url="http://getmoai.com"]http://getmoai.com[/url]

Here is a tutorial if you wish to take a look at whats involved [url="http://getmoai.com/moai-platform-tutorials/moai-tutorials-bug-squisher.html"]http://getmoai.com/m...g-squisher.html[/url]
[/quote]
ok thanks!
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