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Paul C Skertich

To Be Company Or Not To Be....Is The Question

4 posts in this topic

I'm sure every has sat down with themselves and thought hard what they want to be and what they want to do. I dropped out of Arts of Insitute of Pittsburg because I love programming! Additionally, I love self-learning! I look in the mirror of myself and I feel I am assertive, strong and great leadership qualities. So upon thinking of all these traits and my love thrill for programming...Ultimately I have decided to want to develop games as a company. Long ago before this idea jumped out, I read alot of marketing strategies just for fun. Perhaps the interest in public relations, marketing and leadership comes in hand.

Through out my life, people would say I couldn't do this - what happened? I did it! People thought when I lived in Illinois that I was absolutely crazy for going to meet my future wife, even when I was homeless the homeless people would tear me down....Here I am, comfortable typing away to great people on thsi forum with new friends that I've met in conneticut. I use to a paranormal researcher about three years ago with a team in Illinois. Why not now? Well basically the team in Connecticut fell apart after car crash.

So, the question isn't just - "Well, what about Walmart or Target or Bestbuy? like my parents-in-law suggest....It's simple and it may be crazy and obsurd....Because there's something in life that has provided me the tools for today and my future.

So, starting my game development studio won't be easy at all - alot of thought process will have to take place. On my spare time when I'm not editing my engine - I play video games; analyze the structures of what makes a game exciting and fun. What makes it horrible and such. Alot of my times, I get these thoughts too advanced for myself in this moment and as you may have seen I get excited. Heck, I get excited over the small stuff because you gotta admit, when overcoming a hard issue it's pretty rewarding, right?

Additionally, I'm analyzing successful game companies seeing how they keep their precious product in suspense. Building Up the Anticapation of when the next release of their block buster game. Making their audience get so excited that when they release it - boom the sales go out the roof!

I think I am preparation stages now - is there any more to give thought into?
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I hope that the ideas work out for you, but you should do some more research before diving head-first into business.

[quote name='SIC Games' timestamp='1343972304' post='4965760']
Building Up the Anticapation of when the next release of their block buster game. Making their audience get so excited that when they release it - boom the sales go out the roof!
[/quote]
That is true, but the major drawback is, that block buster games have huge marketing budgets, I wouldn't be supprised if these budgets are on par with the development budgets.
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[quote name='SIC Games' timestamp='1343972304' post='4965760']
I'm sure every has sat down with themselves and thought hard what they want to be and what they want to do. I dropped out of Arts of Insitute of Pittsburg because I love programming! Additionally, I love self-learning! I look in the mirror of myself and I feel I am assertive, strong and great leadership qualities. So upon thinking of all these traits and my love thrill for programming...Ultimately I have decided to want to develop games as a company. Long ago before this idea jumped out, I read alot of marketing strategies just for fun. Perhaps the interest in public relations, marketing and leadership comes in hand.

Through out my life, people would say I couldn't do this - what happened? I did it! People thought when I lived in Illinois that I was absolutely crazy for going to meet my future wife, even when I was homeless the homeless people would tear me down....Here I am, comfortable typing away to great people on thsi forum with new friends that I've met in conneticut. I use to a paranormal researcher about three years ago with a team in Illinois. Why not now? Well basically the team in Connecticut fell apart after car crash.

So, the question isn't just - "Well, what about Walmart or Target or Bestbuy? like my parents-in-law suggest....It's simple and it may be crazy and obsurd....Because there's something in life that has provided me the tools for today and my future.

So, starting my game development studio won't be easy at all - alot of thought process will have to take place. On my spare time when I'm not editing my engine - I play video games; analyze the structures of what makes a game exciting and fun. What makes it horrible and such. Alot of my times, I get these thoughts too advanced for myself in this moment and as you may have seen I get excited. Heck, I get excited over the small stuff because you gotta admit, when overcoming a hard issue it's pretty rewarding, right?

Additionally, I'm analyzing successful game companies seeing how they keep their precious product in suspense. Building Up the Anticapation of when the next release of their block buster game. Making their audience get so excited that when they release it - boom the sales go out the roof!

I think I am preparation stages now - is there any more to give thought into?
[/quote]

Good luck with your business.

The thing to remember is that Computer Games are just another piece of software! Which is just another type of product. You should never forget that.

And just like any other business you need capital more than anything.

I would say, start a business strategy, try too have a basic cash flow written out. Decide how much profit you need to live off, and really ask yourself if the payoff is worth the investment of capital (including your time as capital.)

The games industry is not based on 'new ideas', it's recently been about expanding software into the available hardware and even more recently, all about marketing. But bare in mind, that the mobile app seems to be the future, but is saturated with games! If you can think of it, it's probably been done. So you need to do it better, or better yet! Invest a lot of money into marketing.

Programming is a great way to start a business, because you have the reverse of economies of scale. A smaller team can function very well. But you also don't have access to cheap coders in the far east, so it's going to be difficult. Best of luck.
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