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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Jeffige

swing or not to swing

6 posts in this topic

I was copying a couple of tutorials at zetcode.com [url="http://zetcode.com/tutorials/java2dtutorial/"]http://zetcode.com/t...java2dtutorial/[/url] [url="http://zetcode.com/tutorials/javagamestutorial/"]http://zetcode.com/t...agamestutorial/[/url] to turn them into PDF's so I could read them while I travel and the site mentioned java swing.

I have recently undergone the task to learn java programming as my first language. (please don't ask why java. The back and forth from other posts left me loopy). I will hopefully be making simple apps and/ or 2D games for both PC & Android.

So, do I need or should I learn java swing?



Thanks for any help and enlightenment.
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Frankly, I'm always of the opinion that learning a language's core libraries is never a bad thing. Even though Swing is now considered obsolete - and is being replaced by JavaFX - much of the methodology (such as the threading model) is largely the same, so knowing one puts you in a good position to understand the other.

However, if you're just going to be doing Java2D and then progress to LWJGL (or JOGL) with no interest in non-game UI development, then I wouldn't worry about it until you find you need it. Most of Swing's issues involve large scale UI applications; it's easy enough to just "wing it" for something like a simple map editor.
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Swing is a window toolkit. Basically you use swing to define a window on screen and then add buttons and menus to them and link events in your code to those buttons. Pretty much all desktop applications use some sort of window toolkit.

If your not looking to make desktop applications then you won't really need swing. Most graphics frameworks for games etc can create a window to draw into anyway so you won't need swing for that.
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I wouldn't touch Swing. Perhaps I would dabble with the basics of making a JFrame and using the drawing utilities. Otherwise it doesn't really give you much value in terms of game making. It's really meant to be used to be making interfaces. I've written a few games with Swing, but they were mostly grid-based(BattleShip, MineSweeper). Edited by DZee
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I'd recommend the Oracle [url="http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/ui/index.html"]tutorials[/url] and samples - they are very good.

Swing isn't going anywhere, not in the foreseeable future. Whether or not you want to use it depends on what you want to do and how you want to distribute games. Swing is an OK toolkit if you don't ask much. It's main selling point is that it is part of the official Java distribution.

It makes sense to learn Swing, because you can build your tools with it. Since you are just starting out, some games might actually be a lot easier to do in a traditional windowing toolkit, which is probably good for you, as you will gain experience faster. Should you decide to learn and use it, take a look at [url="http://www.eclipse.org/windowbuilder/"]WindowBuilder[/url]- a GUI designer for Swing for eclipse. I haven't used Netbeans, but I've heard it does have a designer for Swing, too. Edited by dilyan_rusev
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I'm at the same point OP is at. Swing is definitely easier to create simple games and learn the code before you move to the harder topics.
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Thanks for the replies.

Since I'm just starting out, I don't want to be overwhelmed with learning too many different things at once. I'll just be the tortoise. Not really looking to win the race, just to have fun running it. (yeah, I don't know where that came from)

Anyway, I'll just walk through the tutorials that I have, yes 1 of them does include a short tutorial on swing. But, it seems to go hand in hand with the rest.

Thanks, again.
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