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serumas

Using Visual C++ 6

15 posts in this topic

[size=2][b]Moderator Note: [/b]This topic was split from another discussion ("[url="http://www.gamedev.net/topic/629216-dx7-vc6-slow-alpha-blending/"]DX7 VC++6 Slow Alpha Blending[/url]") so as to keep the other conversation on topic. - jbadams.[/size]

Im still using vc6 , best compilation speed and performance comparing with vs2008 and code::blocks with gcc, so why not to use it? Edited by jbadams
Added note about splitting topics.
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Performance?
I have tested my game apps with several ides and best performance was shown in vs6, worst in vs2008 allmost 1.5 time slower, with same compilator options.
Ofcouse c++ is not nowadays standart.
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Windows 98 would offer best performance over windows 7 on my hardware, why not use it?
Its obsolete?


The C++ your writing in VC++6 technically isn't valid C++ anymore, the actual compiled code will be far less optimised than using the modern GCC.

Guy above, C++ is now standardised, VC++6 is not compliant. GCC is. And its a compiler, not compilator. If your code is running faster in VC++6 then it means your code is being written in the non standard C++ used by it and probably optimised for that compiler, go run actual C++ code through it and it WILL be slower at run time.
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Aside from the above, some day your code is just no longer going to run. I know of projects originally built with VC6 that crash and burn horribly on 64-bit Windows 7; a simple and minimal port to VC2008, a quick recompile later, and they work perfectly again.

You can put off a move to a more modern environment until the bitter end, and then find yourself having to do an emergency upgrade that you'll most likely make a mess of the first time.

Or you can start a sensibly phased upgrade now and have everything nice and clean.

Your choice.
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[quote name='serumas' timestamp='1344330245' post='4966947']
Ofcouse c++ is not nowadays standart
[/quote]
C++ was [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO/IEC_14882#Standardization"]standardised in 1998[/url], [i]after[/i] the release of Visual Studio 6. Code that does not follow that (or one of the two more recent C++ standards, in 2003 and 2011) is not considered to be valid C++.
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Thats the point of standart if the same code compiles on vs6 and on vs2008 with no changes in code.
So is my code standart c++, if compiles on both?
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why are you guys getting sore about this?Just let the guy use whatever he wants, at the end, is the results that counts and this guy isn't doing anything to write home about, so let him waste his time however he wants.
Now, if a new great game came out and was compiled with VC6 that would be news, but a random dude on a forum convinced that VC6 + DX7 is the nirvana of computing? Who cares?
This just goes into the same category of the heroes that show up in every IDE thread claming they write all their software with VIM + command line.. and then you discover they write 1000 lines of code per year.. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img] .

Programmers resisting innovation and progress is such a contradiction, I never stop getting amazed watching them.
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[quote name='kunos' timestamp='1344373746' post='4967147']
why are you guys getting sore about this?Just let the guy use whatever he wants, at the end, is the results that counts and this guy isn't doing anything to write home about, so let him waste his time however he wants.
[/quote]
Absolutely, but given he asked the question I feel it's best to at least try to explain our objections. :-)

(Posted from mobile.)
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Pretty sure I read somewhere that Dx7 and 8 aren't even supported on windows 8 anymore, probably wrong, then again why would they support it?
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[quote name='6677' timestamp='1344423473' post='4967343']
Pretty sure I read somewhere that Dx7 and 8 aren't even supported on windows 8 anymore, probably wrong, then again why would they support it?
[/quote]
And what makes you think Windows 8 will ever be used on the guy's system :)

I've had to port code from VS6 to 2005, there were so many issues.

But I agree, if this guy finds that he can do what he needs to for his personal enjoyment using VS6 then so be it.
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[quote name='kunos' timestamp='1344373746' post='4967147']
why are you guys getting sore about this?Just let the guy use whatever he wants, at the end, is the results that counts and this guy isn't doing anything to write home about, so let him waste his time however he wants.
[/quote]

It's not getting sore. If you go anywhere in IT asking for help, and if you're on an obsolete, unsupported and demonstrably broken platform, the first thing to do is get you onto one that's reasonably up to date and sane - chances are that on it's own will fix your problems.
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Besides, the attitude of the OP was that it would be a good idea to be using VC6 (as well as explicitly asking why not to use it). If he had said something on the lines of "I'm still using VC6 and it works for me, despite issues like P0, P1, P2, ... and P<pretty much infinity> compared to a modern tool" then hardly anyone would have had a problem with it. Everyone needs some kind of hobby.
Personally I do not have a problem with that hobby being (figuratively) sleeping in a bath tub full of deadly scorpions (provided care is taken the scorpions don't get injured or can escape to harm nearby innocents). I do object to someone saying sleeping in a bath tub full of deadly scorpions is a good idea and everyone should be doing it.
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Lol i would only use it if I had to use it.... Targeting win95 or win32s if oh god some people remember that far... Did vc6 still generate windows 3.1 binaries?

Another reason to use it is if you have to use it. I taught a vb class recently and department told me not to use modern vb.net. Book also used old vb and provided vb working model. So sometimes classes are taught using classic versions of the language.
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