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kaktusas2598

Topics to master in C++ before advandce to next level

14 posts in this topic

I think a majority of it actually has to do with learning how to program, skills that you can take from 1 language into another, but with regards to C++, you will want to learn and udnerstand

STL - Its a big part of C++ (or you could be brave and do it all alone); containers, iterators, strings, regular expressions, streams
Memory Management (including Smart Pointers)
C++11 features (move semantics, use of lambda expressions, Initializer lists ... I can't even remember them all anymore lol)
Templates
Multithreading

And just work on building up your design, theres alot of different paradigms out there
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Must say, thanks to everyone as I am kind of in the place of OP as well.

Followup question: where should I begin learning the more esoteric C++ stuff?
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You should read and understand everything in the [url="http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/"]C++ FAQ Lite[/url], and for revision and more esoteric topics, read [url="http://www.gotw.ca/gotw/"]Guru of the Week[/url].

[quote name='slip' timestamp='1344466762' post='4967565']
Something that is often overlooked by people learning to program is the importance of design patterns. Design patterns aren't about how to write code in a particular language but rather how to structure code and make it as flexible and robust as possible.
[/quote]I'd say they're more about just giving names to common patterns that seem to be re-invented over and over again, to make conversing with other programmers and explaining your code easier ([i]as well as refining these common patterns down to their core idea[/i]). They shouldn't be used as a "play book" of designs, though yes, they can be a good learning resource if you've never seen a certain pattern used before. Edited by Hodgman
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@Hodgman. I do agree. Some patterns do emerge and are intuitive. I certainly don't consult a book to determine which patterns to use for a given problem. Which patterns to use is something you get a feel for over time. Not everyone "thinks of" or stumbles across all patterns though, especially if they develop habits that mean they never head down a path to learn potentially more useful patterns.
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Hmm.. Does it really worth to learn all new C++11 features in order before advancing into creating games or other complexed applications? Thumbs up, though, for STL. I know it is very important in game programming and proramming in general.
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[quote name='IronyGames' timestamp='1344502137' post='4967677']
Followup question: where should I begin learning the more esoteric C++ stuff?
[/quote]

There are a few places. I would recommend checking out the C++ newsgroup comp.lang.c++.moderated (http://www.gotw.ca/resources/clcm.htm), there are always some crazy C++ topics going on in there, and I learn something everytime I read it.

Another set of books is the Essential C++ and Essential STL books, as they cover some basic things as well as overlooked things (such as the STL vector <bool> being specialized in its implementation (which is unlike the rest of the STL)).

Articles by Andrei Alexandrescu or Herb Sutter usually cover some advanced topics.

Also, if you are interested in esoteric template stuff, check out [i]template metaprogramming[/i] examples implemented in C++. (http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/3743/A-gentle-introduction-to-Template-Metaprogramming)

[quote name='kaktusas2598' timestamp='1344523019' post='4967796']
it really worth to learn all new C++11 features in order before advancing into creating games or other complexed applications?
[/quote]

IMHO no. In fact, relying on C++ 11 features may prevent you from writing good cross-platform code as it is only supported by the newest compilers, and even then it seems implementations vary widely compared to implementation of older C++ features. Also, I haven't see much code that uses C++11 features. Honestly, you're better off not using it until you really have a lot of experience in programming and game creation. I would even turn to third party libraries such as Boost first which have a lot of C++11 functionality, but at the additional benefit that it is more portable.

BTW, I have been programming in C++ for 6+ years, and I have never [i]needed[/i] C++11 type functionality. It has some really usefuly features, and I am getting into using them now mainly for specialized applications, but it certainly is not nessecary. I would never use it in open source software i would release to the publice. I would recommend getting in the habit of using smart pointers and the such, but unfortunately a lot of real production code doeesn't use these (at least that I've seen).

That's my opinion on C++ 11, but I welcome any opposing views!
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OK. So can anyone give me best resource for learning STL after I finish with general C++?
And it is worth to learn C++ file handling if I will do all file handling in QT and so on. I think SDL have its own file handling.
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[quote name='kaktusas2598' timestamp='1344543730' post='4967898']
OK. So can anyone give me best resource for learning STL after I finish with general C++?
And it is worth to learn C++ file handling if I will do all file handling in QT and so on. I think SDL have its own file handling.
[/quote]

C++ file handling is virtually identically to string console handling, so you will get that as a freebie.

I would consider picking up a book at that point personally.
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