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Pretty advanced pointer problem

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[quote name='dimitri.adamou' timestamp='1344857998' post='4969021']
Oops. My bad, I went through your code and saw that in item.h virtual is defined.. but it is derived from yet another class.

Your classes are trying to do too much, the design is a bit confusing - you should try seperate everything as much as possible. Someone wrote a really good article on gdev.net, but I can't seem to find it.. it spoke about foward declaration and just maintaining neatness in code

I haven't spent much time in there though. But yeah, back to my original point - your classes are trying to do too much
[/quote]

Yeah, i've gathered that.

Sp basically i'll have to look up how i use inheritage as well as splitting up my code further into "master classes" that can be accessed to all classes that needs to use that code. So for example instead of having a movement function in both player and enemy i should just make that one function in the Entity class (which is their interface class)? That's what you mean right?

Someone mentioned that my loadFiles class is inherit weirdly. He said that the code is probably being run several times (meaning the files that are loaded are loaded several times). He continued to say that i should look up composition vs inheritance. I'm guessing that after reading up on that i might help to solve some of the problems i am having.

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[quote name='dimitri.adamou' timestamp='1344892563' post='4969191']
It almost sounds like you have a race condition going on, is there any multi threading involved?
[/quote]

I haven't created any additional threads. So unless they can be created without me actively writing the code for it it's not

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[quote name='Bluefirehawk' timestamp='1344849432' post='4968990']
I'm sorry Servant of the Lord, I have to disagree strongly.

A "break;" statement in a for loop doesn't make sense. By doing this:
[CODE]
for(vector<Container*>::iterator it = containers.begin(); it != containers.end(); it++)
{
if(!(*it)->getFull())
{
(*it)->addItem(itemAdd);
break;
}
}
[/CODE]
You modified a for loop to a while loop. Hence what you really need here is a while loop.
Both works fine, it makes a difference when a Theoretical IT guy needs to verifiy the program.
A for loop is simple, it knows at runtime the exact amount of times the body is executed. A while loop is a bit more complicated. And by camouflaging a for loop in a while loop, you make the poor guy cry.

[/quote]


I would just like to point out that this is almost exactly backwards. Using a while loop here would be emulating a for loop, not the other way around. I still see a lot of people espousing the antiquated C coding standards that say not to use a break in a for loop, but they are just that; outdated. The only time you will ever know at runtime how many times a for loop will be executed is if you use a constant value in a conditional test.

Obviously the preferable method here would be to use an algorithm like std::find_if as another poster mentioned. But absent that, a for loop is a better option than a while loop. Indeed, std::find_if itself is typically implemented as a for loop with a break, i.e.:

[CODE]
// TEMPLATE FUNCTION find_if
template<class _InIt, class _Pr> inline
_InIt _Find_if(_InIt _First, _InIt _Last, _Pr _Pred)
{
// find first satisfying _Pred
for (; _First != _Last; ++_First)
if (_Pred(*_First))
break;
return (_First);
}
[/CODE]

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