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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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3Ddreamer

C# Learning Sources

29 posts in this topic

Some people still use visual studio 2005 and 2008, seeming as 2012 is only just coming out in a month or 2 (release candidate versions are available) I don't think your choice of C#4 in VS2010 is a bad one. I would give it another 2 or 3 years before upgrading might be worth it, even then most of the C#4 stuff carries on into C#5 with no changes apparently so your code will still work (axiom may need recompiling for .net 4.5 but by then I guess they will have done it already)
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Good day, guys

The next several weeks or months, I will be focused on C# with mostly the help of books, VS 2010, libraries, and Axiom 3D game engine. However, I decided to spend some of the time introducing myself to game oriented math, hardware, graphics ( general overview with C#, scripting languages, and games in mind ). From experience over the last several years as a modder digging into games and simulations, I know firsthand how beneficial it can be to examin the game engine. With time spent on Axiom 3D game engine and looking at the games that others have made with it, I am sure to gain insight into how a game is made, especially with the help of the team over there.

And that is just it: Teamwork will be the key to learning things faster than would be learned otherwise.

Most of my time over the coming weeks and months will be spent in the books with C#. Down the road I will slowly add .NET and later a scripting language, but that is quite a number of months down the road. Things will start simple and evolve into a system of mine in years to come. Simple to start but growing in a balanced and prioritized way is my strategy.

So for now, this fresh newbie in programming will keep crawling like a baby in C# until I can walk, jump, and eventually run with it. I will know when the time arrives to learn more things as I come to those points.

Thanks so much everyone for all the advice!

[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

3Ddreamer
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[size=4][quote name='nfries88' timestamp='1346113270' post='4973947']
Looking for portability? Hard to go wrong with Tao, or Unity3D if you're willing to lay down some cash.

I'd recommend XNA for now, actually. Like I told you in another thread, I found it to be an excellent API, with its downside being a general lack of portability. But don't worry about portability now -- get the experience first, portability is easy enough later.

EDIT: Just did some quick research on OpenTK, and it seems like a decent library.
[/quote]

Hi, nfries88

Tao or Python are most attractive to me at this point for a scripting language after C# because they are more user friendly (learner friendly) and have the portability, but I am looking into XNA as people suggested.

" Professional XNA Game Programming - for Xbox 360 and Windows " by [u]Benjamin Nitschke[/u] - Wrox, a Wiley Publication. This library book caught my attention for extra reading after the day's work in C#.

Guys...

This thread was a ton of help and I really appreciate everyone's time. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] I'm sure that it will help others, too.

I am on semi-vacation for a few more weeks but still manage to find time with C# 4.0 and Visual Studio Express 2010. Getting "Hello World" to change size took me almost a week but I got it! Yeah! I think that I can eventually make a slider to change the size in real time. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/cool.png[/img]

Thanks, so much! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]


Clinton[/size]
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Hello world shouldn't be changing size???

Hello world would be a normal console application assuming you started from the beginning, the console text is all fixed size and font (but not colour)
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I managed to get it to change size, but not font. It takes changing things line by line and selecting something in VS and saving, but it showed me that a little application could be made which handles it on the side. I guess it would not work with a slider in real time but maybe changes can be made by an external custom made device and restart it.


Clinton
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