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dAND3h

Environment to learn shader programming

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Hi, I learned the basics behind shader programming, with the vertex and pixel shaders, but what I want to do now is write my own shaders for practice. But, I want to know if there is an environment that is available where I can write my shader and see the results straight away. The way I did it before was using XNA, meaning I had to write all the code to draw a cube and things like that.

I guess I am just looking for a way to be able to practice my shader programming that will just focus on the shader part and not the setting up part.

Thanks

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Hi thanks, unfortunately, I receive an error message when I try to run the .msi installer : "This installation package could not be opened etc.". I googled this error in relation to render monkey and didn't see any hits on the first few pages. Any idea?

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If you want to get a feeling for it I would start with just pixel shaders, see whats possible

So you could get rendermonkey / fxcomposer and just edit some of the examples and see what happens.

You could also try media player classic - the dx renderer allows you to use a built in shader editor and there are examples you can edit.

If you have a gfx with above ps3.0 run an upto date copy of Chrome browser. Try iq's Shader Toy
http://www.iquilezles.org/apps/shadertoy/
Although most of the examples are not surface shaders, so that could throw you a bit. But it shows you what is possible without rendering 3d models.
Have a go at live editing the shaders. (iq also has some examples using a live editor on youtube worth looking at)

Shader Toy is GLSL, if you prefer HLSL that is not a big deal because they are very similar, learning one you will be pretty much learning the other.

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