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OpenGL book for beginner

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Hello,

I've been reading "OpenGL Programming Guide" 7th edition for a while. But I am not sure how much of the information is up to date and what's used in practice.

Shall I continue reading this book or find another ?

I want to learn the newest OpenGL standard (if I can call it like that).

Thanks !

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See if http://www.arcsynthesis.org/gltut/index.html helps, its at least free and may be of use...at the very least it may have some references for you to chase up.

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Yes, that's good.

Some more suggestions would be nice.

Oh, by the way my laptop's graphic supports only OpenGL 2.1 :( .
Will this hinder my future progress , I mean do I need to get a PC that supports at least 3.x so I can become a better (qualified) OpenGL developer or 2.1 will do ?

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Well it obviously means you don't have all the new features like geometry shader, tessellation etc. to play with. But as far as coding style and deprecation goes I think you can get a good approximation of "modern OpenGL" by not relying on things like the matrix stack and default attributes. Just consistently use VBOs, custom attributes and stay clear of the matrix stack... Edited by japro

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I also found that Beginning OpenGL through Game Programming by Luke Benstead to be a pretty good introduction to it as well, its not as clear and detailed as the Seventh Edition Programming Guide you have, but it could help introduce concepts a little easier.

And yes, what Japro said, VBOs, GLSL even, using 2.1 doesn't mean you won't understand the modern features (heck i'm using it now, to support the OLD hardware out on the market) and the difference isn't really that big.

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I've been told to use Render Monkey or NVIDIA FX Composer for writing shaders. What would you say ?

And some good news - I did check my desktop and it's graphic card supports OpenGL 3.3 , so when needed I will use my desktop :)

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Use whatever you feel comfortable with, once you can add meshes and compile shaders in your game, its a not a problem just running it with various shaders. Render Monkey isn't even being update anymore I think, someone could clarify, and I dont know much about Nvidia, but you can write shaders in anything, even in notepad, the beauty of those two, is you can generally see the results without having to load meshses/shaders into your game.

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