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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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derda4

submit patents

4 posts in this topic

The Apple vs Samsung is so ridiculous, that I want to submit some patents as well.- Is it possible for a EU citizen to submit patents in the USA?

Where and how to do that?

Thanks
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The agency's site is here: [url="http://www.uspto.gov/patents/process/index.jsp"]http://www.uspto.gov...ocess/index.jsp[/url]
I hope you've got a few grand ready to waste: [url="http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/ac/qs/ope/fee092611.htm"]http://www.uspto.gov...e/fee092611.htm[/url]

What are you hoping to patent? Most game software shouldn't need patenting.

IANAL, but a common method to protect yourself from patent trolls is to simply publish details of your invention publicly. Edited by Hodgman
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[quote name='Hodgman' timestamp='1346746361' post='4976337']
IANAL, but a common method to protect yourself from patent trolls is to simply publish details of your invention publicly.
[/quote]
At which point the troll files a patent for your invention, and still tries to sue you anyway. Publishing details is enough to win the court case, but that doesn't help much once the verdict has been reached, and the troll simply calls in the administrators declaring chapter 11 bankruptcy (which is far too common). Net result is a lengthy court case, a load of unpaid legal fees, and a patent troll who merrily skips off into the distance in search of his next victim.....
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[quote name='RobTheBloke' timestamp='1346763684' post='4976402']At which point the troll files a patent for your invention, and still tries to sue you anyway. Publishing details is enough to win the court case, but that doesn't help much once the verdict has been reached, and the troll simply calls in the administrators declaring chapter 11 bankruptcy (which is far too common). Net result is a lengthy court case, a load of unpaid legal fees, and a patent troll who merrily skips off into the distance in search of his next victim.....
[/quote]If you want to be [i]really[/i] pessimistic, even if you do file, the troll can still file a patent that does something slightly more than yours and deliberately leave your patent out of their prior-art search ([i]as the USPO doesn't do real prior-art searches themselves[/i]), and then still sue you as above.
There's literally nothing you can do to protect yourself from spurious lawsuits. Ermirucah. Edited by Hodgman
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[quote]The Apple vs Samsung is so ridiculous, that I want to submit some patents as well.- Is it possible for a EU citizen to submit patents in the USA?
Where and how to do that?
[/quote]
Presuming your question was serious and not rhetorical, then answer is "Yes you can."
The web sites referenced above show you where.
The how is a bit more complicated.
In order to file the patent, you need to "reduce your idea to practice". That can be either actually building a prototypo or (as is more often the case) creating a fairly detailed description of your invention.
The description should be detailed enough that someone who is "skilled in the art" would be able to create a prototype of your invention simply by reading your description.

You also need to do some preliminary research to see if what you have invented has already been invented. That means doing a patent search (to see if anyone else has patented your idea already) or if someone has already published your idea without patenting it.
Once you create the detailed description (look over existing patents to get an idea of form), you need contact a qualified patent attorney to re-write your description using proper legal wording as well as write up your "claims". The claims (which are at the end of a patent) try to be a precise legal description of your invention.

It's not especially cheap-- I just went through this myself and cost about $10,000 USD for one patent in attorney's fees and filing fees.

You also need to figure out [i][b]why [/b][/i]you want a patent. Is it because you are building a business and the patent would give you protection of your (hopefully) original idea? In that case, it can be very worthwhile. Otherwise, think hard about whether its worth it or not.


Brian Schmidt
Register for [url="http://www.gamesoundcon.com"]GameSoundCon[/url]San Francisco
Oct 24-25, 2012
[b][i]Earlybird registration[/i][/b] ends Sept 28
www.GameSoundCon.com Edited by bschmidt1962
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