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Tyl3r684

Best language to be "versatile" in game making.

68 posts in this topic

My friend and I are small coders, know some here, know some there, but...We are looking for a language to be open to make any kind of game, I do not mean FPS or something like that witch requires Unity, UnReal, etc. We are looking for a CODING language that can be made into 2d, Not any 3d! And by games I mean 2d-sh game, aka at a angle, and it be able to be used on any type of game like that and be made to look nice and PROFESSIONAL, I was thinking C/C++ or Java, what do you guys think? Maybe even top down, or complete side view, please reply! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
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[quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1347075542' post='4977886']
[u][i][b]Any[/b][/i][/u] language meets those requirements.

Professional quality games have even been developed in Game Maker ([url="http://store.steampowered.com/app/109200/"]Legend of Fae[/url], [url="http://store.steampowered.com/app/201480/"]Serious Sam: The Random Encounter[/url]), RPG Maker ([url="http://freebirdgames.com/to_the_moon/"]To The Moon[/url]), and Multimedia Fusion ([url="http://store.steampowered.com/app/48900/"]Saira[/url]). [url="http://www.terraria.org/"]Terraria[/url] was written in C# with XNA. [url="http://www.runescape.com/"]RuneScape[/url] was written with Java.


It isn't the language or tool you use that makes a game look professional, it's the quality of the artwork and the polish you put into the game. It really doesn't matter which language you choose as long as it's capable of displaying graphics and playing sounds -- which really aren't limiting factors. You'll be able to make any type of game, with any 2d view with any language you might care to choose.


So, what languages do you already know?

Python and C# are commonly recommended options, both of which are more than capable of meeting your needs.
[/quote]


I looked at tutorials on BOTH, and to me, well, to us, We like python. C++ Looks difficult, not saying it is, just saying it looks, and In contrast, All the games made on Java/C++ are they ABLE to be made in Python, like in theory, and in another note, is python, powerful/popular/worth learning?

_Edit* I saw you asked what I knew, Honestly..I have very little in java, from messing with Minecraft Mods, I am fluent in HTML/CSS, but that is not important haha, and for Python I have watched about 5 tutorials from thenewboston And in C...NOTHING I am not educated in C at all! Edited by Tyl3r684
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You should choose whatever language you are most comfortable with.

C++ is generally considered to be a little more difficult than some other languages, so if you think it looks harder I'd probably trust that instinct, it's probably a good one.

[quote name='Tyl3r684' timestamp='1347076787' post='4977891']
are they ABLE to be made in Python, like in theory, and in another note, is python, powerful/popular/worth learning?
[/quote]
Absolutely. Python can definitely be used to make games, it's very popular, and it's definitely a useful general purpose language that's worth learning. Python was uses extensively in the creation of [url="http://www.eveonline.com/"]EVE Online[/url] and [url="http://toontown.go.com/"]ToonTown Online[/url], and was used as a scripting language in [url="http://www.civ4.com/"]Civilization 4[/url]. You can read some things people from companies such as Google, Industrial Light and Magic, and others have said about Python [url="http://www.python.org/about/quotes/"]on their website[/url].

Once you've learned the basics and are comfortable with the language (perhaps using the freely available [url="http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIPython"]Thinking In Python[/url]) you'll probably want to look into using either [url="http://www.pygame.org/news.html"]PyGame[/url] or [url="http://www.pyglet.org/"]Pyglet[/url]; you'll probably find PyGame more approachable.
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[quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1347077821' post='4977894']
You should choose whatever language you are most comfortable with.

C++ is generally considered to be a little more difficult than some other languages, so if you think it looks harder I'd probably trust that instinct, it's probably a good one.

[quote name='Tyl3r684' timestamp='1347076787' post='4977891']
are they ABLE to be made in Python, like in theory, and in another note, is python, powerful/popular/worth learning?
[/quote]
Absolutely. Python can definitely be used to make games, it's very popular, and it's definitely a useful general purpose language that's worth learning. Python was uses extensively in the creation of [url="http://www.eveonline.com/"]EVE Online[/url] and [url="http://toontown.go.com/"]ToonTown Online[/url], and was used as a scripting language in [url="http://www.civ4.com/"]Civilization 4[/url]. You can read some things people from companies such as Google, Industrial Light and Magic, and others have said about Python [url="http://www.python.org/about/quotes/"]on their website[/url].

Once you've learned the basics and are comfortable with the language (perhaps using the freely available [url="http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython/"]Thinking In Python[/url]) you'll probably want to look into using either [url="http://www.pygame.org/news.html"]PyGame[/url] or [url="http://www.pyglet.org/"]Pyglet[/url]; you'll probably find PyGame more approachable.
[/quote]

Shocker 1_ EVE was made/assoc. with PYTHON? That is awesome!
As for another note, We are fully going for python/pygame thank you! I am ready to start learning! :)
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[quote name='Servant of the Lord' timestamp='1347075541' post='4977885']
keep on striking the anvil until what you are forging is finished.
[/quote]

QFT. Often times, I find myself quitting early and getting discouraged. Just make sure you always stick with it until the end and you will learn a lot and feel good in the end [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
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[quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1347080627' post='4977903']
I received the following question from the original poster via private message, but I'm answering here so others can also benefit from the responses.


[quote name='Tyl3r684']
As you know I want to begin python, where may I find updated tutorials there all from 2 - 3 years ago... :|
[/quote]
You'll want to learn Python 2.7 rather than Python 3; the differences (from your perspective) will be fairly minor and easily adjusted to once you decide to update, but for now a lot of the libraries (such as PyGame) you will want to use have not been updated to Python 3.

I recommend [url="http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIPython"]Thinking In Python[/url], [url="http://www.ibiblio.org/g2swap/byteofpython/read/"]A Byte of Python[/url], and [url="http://www.python.org/doc/"]the official documentation[/url] for learning Python. Once you get to learning Pygame you'll want to start with the official documentation and tutorials listed on the website.
[/quote]

Would there be a difference between 3, and 2? We both have 3 and are willing to downgrade.
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[quote name='zer0wolf' timestamp='1347082859' post='4977910']
I LOOOOOVE Python. I am not a programmer by any means, but have still been able to write very useful tools in Python for work.

I originally went through the free book [url="http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython/"]http://www.greenteap...om/thinkpython/[/url], which has been used/revised for classroom use for several years now.

I recommend downloading and using Python 2.7, since basically every library out there work with it, plus it has had a lot of the great improvements made for the 3.x series backported to it. Python 3.2 is technically newer and the language has had a few changes to make it more "Pythonic", but not all the stabilized and proven libraries work with it yet.

I use Aptana + PyDev for my IDE and debugger. It is a fantastic free dev environment for Python.
[/quote]

I looked at Aptana and PyDev, they seem to do basically the same thing...I am going with Aptana, because installing pydev was difficult, Aptana looks nice! Edited by Tyl3r684
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[quote name='Shaquil' timestamp='1347115335' post='4977987']
But when we're talking about making games, I reiterate, you're going to have to read some C at some point).[/quote]

No you aren't.
There is no ultimate 'you must use a C language for making games' requirement anywhere.

People make games in Python, in C#, in Java, in JavaScript, in Lua and others without touching a line of C or C++.

If Python fits the need of the OP then there is NOTHING to be gained by going to a more complex language which is considerably more dangerous to use. And lets not fools ourselves here; C++ IS a complex language. Yes, you can use it for a year and go 'hey, there is nothing hard here..' but that's because you've been using it for a year and you've no idea what lurks in the darker areas of the language or [b]how many mistakes you have already made which haven't come back to bite you yet.[/b]

At one year of using C++, more so if its your first language, I do not believe you are qualified to say how hard the language is. You are still very firmly a beginner and more than likely are making mistakes which you are lucky haven't blown up in your face yet. I work with professionals on a daily basis who have been using C++ (as well as many other languages; C++ is not an end point either, most professionals if any degree of skill will know a few languages and can switch between them at will) for years and still make mistakes which can lead to hours in a debugger tracking them down.

So no, C++ is not easy.
It might look easy but that's just because you don't know what you are doing wrong.
(and that's coming from someone with 10+ years of using the language behind them.)
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[quote name='Shaquil' timestamp='1347115335' post='4977987']
1. C++ is not nearly as hard as you think. In fact, since I started I've always wondered what exactly is supposed to be so hard about it.[/quote]
Wrong. You just haven't explored enough of the language to be bitten by it yet.

[quote]2. C++ is widely considered the "main" gaming language. It's what industry professionals use, it's what indie devs use, and it's what you'll probably have to learn eventually.[/quote]
C++ is still quite widely used for pragmatic reasons, but I'd say it has fallen far out of favour, even with many industry types.

[quote]3. And finally, the most important thing: C++ is just damn fun. It's so complex, so versatile, and there's always something new to learn.[/quote]
There is always something new to learn. That includes vitally important pitfalls that you have yet to learn, and will eventually trip you up.

[quote]C++ is not advanced calculus.[/quote]
It's more like a live nuke with rusted wiring.

[quote]Programming is programming is programming*.
[size=2]*Unless you go from procedural programming to a functional programming language like Haskell.[/size][/quote]
As a programmer, you ought to recognise that functional languages are just another facet of the familiar (hint: many modern C++ idioms come directly from functional programming).
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[quote name='Tyl3r684' timestamp='1347119478' post='4978004']
I looked at Aptana and PyDev, they seem to do basically the same thing...I am going with Aptana, because installing pydev was difficult, Aptana looks nice!
[/quote]
Aptana is an IDE, based off of Eclipse. PyDev is a plug-in for Eclipse and Aptana (now developed by the Aptana team), that adds Python support to the IDE. Aptana just so happens to come bundled with PyDev.
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[quote name='zer0wolf' timestamp='1347132297' post='4978074']
[quote name='Tyl3r684' timestamp='1347119478' post='4978004']
I looked at Aptana and PyDev, they seem to do basically the same thing...I am going with Aptana, because installing pydev was difficult, Aptana looks nice!
[/quote]
Aptana is an IDE, based off of Eclipse. PyDev is a plug-in for Eclipse and Aptana (now developed by the Aptana team), that adds Python support to the IDE. Aptana just so happens to come bundled with PyDev.
[/quote]


I have been looking at PyGame/Python tutorials, and it seems difficult-ISH to the extent of all the tutorials are old...
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I'm going to take a stab here and guess that you're trying to walk before crawling [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] Spend a couple weeks to work your way through all of the exercises in the book I linked to above and/or check out some of the books jbadams linked to. The one I linked to, Think Python, was written by a professor for his intro to programming class, and has iterated on in for several years now from feedback from his peers and students. I believe it does a great job at walking you through the fundamentals of Python. I do mean EVERY exercise, don't skip out or you're only hurting yourself. THEN move onto the PyGame tuts! Edited by zer0wolf
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1347121744' post='4978017']
Wrong. You just haven't explored enough of the language to be bitten by it yet.
[/quote]

You don't have any idea how much I know about C++, and so your vague "Ya just don't know enough yet, sonny!" statement is unqualified and invalid.

[quote]C++ is still quite widely used for pragmatic reasons, but I'd say it has fallen far out of favour, even with many industry types.[/quote]

Oh, it's still widely used? Well I'm glad we agree.


[quote]There is always something new to learn. That includes vitally important pitfalls that you have yet to learn, and will eventually trip you up.[/quote]
Once again, you have no idea my skills or knowledge of C++. I also enjoy the implication. Something will trip me up and so I should avoid it? Then at what point does the "learning" thingy happen again? Fill me in.

[quote]It's more like a live nuke with rusted wiring.[/quote]

I love it so much when people use these extremely hyperbolic descriptions of advanced topics/programming languages. I guess it's an easy way to scare the hell out of beginners because it doesn't seem to make any sense whatsoever. You hear people say this kind of stuff and think "What the hell is this guy talking about? Whatever it is, it sounds like worst possible thing that could ever happen to me ever. I better do what he says." What is this nuclear holocaust that could potential spark because someone started with C++ instead of actionscript or something? What's the implication? "You didn't delete that memory you allocated! YOU'VE DESTROYED THE FREE WORLD." Oh please.

If you disagree with me, fine. I made it clear at the start of my post that many, many people disagree with me. But trying to undermine my credibility is ridiculous and childish. You don't know anything about me. Edited by Shaquil
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[quote name='phantom' timestamp='1347120468' post='4978010']
[quote name='Shaquil' timestamp='1347115335' post='4977987']
But when we're talking about making games, I reiterate, you're going to have to read some C at some point).[/quote]

No you aren't.
There is no ultimate 'you must use a C language for making games' requirement anywhere.

People make games in Python, in C#, in Java, in JavaScript, in Lua and others without touching a line of C or C++.

If Python fits the need of the OP then there is NOTHING to be gained by going to a more complex language which is considerably more dangerous to use. And lets not fools ourselves here; C++ IS a complex language. Yes, you can use it for a year and go 'hey, there is nothing hard here..' but that's because you've been using it for a year and you've no idea what lurks in the darker areas of the language or [b]how many mistakes you have already made which haven't come back to bite you yet.[/b]

At one year of using C++, more so if its your first language, I do not believe you are qualified to say how hard the language is. You are still very firmly a beginner and more than likely are making mistakes which you are lucky haven't blown up in your face yet. I work with professionals on a daily basis who have been using C++ (as well as many other languages; C++ is not an end point either, most professionals if any degree of skill will know a few languages and can switch between them at will) for years and still make mistakes which can lead to hours in a debugger tracking them down.

So no, C++ is not easy.
It might look easy but that's just because you don't know what you are doing wrong.
(and that's coming from someone with 10+ years of using the language behind them.)
[/quote]

Once again, I must state how funny it is to see people talk about programming as if it's bomb defusal. So let's unwrap some of the logic here:

I've been programming in C++ for a little over a year, and according to you it's likely that I have yet to encounter [i][b]any[/b][/i] of the world-ending, flood-causing, tsunami stirring disastrous mistakes that you can make when writing C++. Which means, then, that none of these vague, non-specified horrors actually apply to a beginner. Right? I haven't come across them yet, my life isn't a waking nightmare, and I [i]enjoy[/i] C++ and coding games with it. So then how is it a bad language for beginners, exactly? I'll never understand this use of vague scare tactics to keep people from just [i]trying the damn language out[/i]. Don't do it! There's stuff hidden! You're [i]too stupid to make the mistakes, that's why you haven't made them yet!!!![/i] Oh, well then I guess I'm all good then. And when I do make the mistakes, I'll probably do what you did: [b]Learn from them[/b].

Typical forum behavior. You see someone who's honest about their possible ignorance and try to inflate it to a size reasonable enough for you to discredit his opinions. Instead of arguing against what I say reasonably, you try to take away my voice by reminding me and everyone else that "You haven't been doing it enough yet to ruin everything." But as I've already shown, if I've been doing it a year and I still haven't encountered the horrors, that means beginners won't encounter the horrors until they're not beginners anymore. And even if I do find out something and want to switch languages, is that the death of my programming career? Is Java an entirely different world? Or Python? Or [i]any other object-oriented language[/i]? Was my time spent with C++ wasted? Will I start from scratch? This is ridiculous.
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[quote name='phantom' timestamp='1347120468' post='4978010']
[quote name='Shaquil' timestamp='1347115335' post='4977987']
But when we're talking about making games, I reiterate, you're going to have to read some C at some point).[/quote]

No you aren't.
There is no ultimate 'you must use a C language for making games' requirement anywhere.

People make games in Python, in C#, in Java, in JavaScript, in Lua and others without touching a line of C or C++.

If Python fits the need of the OP then there is NOTHING to be gained by going to a more complex language which is considerably more dangerous to use. And lets not fools ourselves here; C++ IS a complex language. Yes, you can use it for a year and go 'hey, there is nothing hard here..' but that's because you've been using it for a year and you've no idea what lurks in the darker areas of the language or [b]how many mistakes you have already made which haven't come back to bite you yet.[/b]

At one year of using C++, more so if its your first language, I do not believe you are qualified to say how hard the language is. You are still very firmly a beginner and more than likely are making mistakes which you are lucky haven't blown up in your face yet. I work with professionals on a daily basis who have been using C++ (as well as many other languages; C++ is not an end point either, most professionals if any degree of skill will know a few languages and can switch between them at will) for years and still make mistakes which can lead to hours in a debugger tracking them down.

So no, C++ is not easy.
It might look easy but that's just because you don't know what you are doing wrong.
(and that's coming from someone with 10+ years of using the language behind them.)
[/quote]
I know that from personal experience

In my opinion it depends on platform really, i would pick c# for windows because of XNA and its xbox and windows phone support while on others i would say python and pygame due to the simplicity of it of the day i have tested it.

Good luck
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Guys, let's not turn this into a language flame war thread, okay?

@OP: As you can see, it's not really about the tools so much as it is about the craftsman. Any of the languages mentioned will be more than enough for your needs, and any language you choose is going to offer up plenty of learning opportunities. There is a lot of argument and discussion about the easiest language, the hardest language, etc... but rest assured that all of them offer challenges aplenty, and all of them offer ways to both create awesome things and shoot yourself in the foot many times in the process. The important thing is that whatever you choose, be it C#, C++, Python, Lua or something more esoteric like D or even (don't do this) Brainf**k; stick with it and give yourself plenty of time to learn it and gain experience. A good programmer can change languages very quickly; after all, most languages have far more in common with one another than differences.
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[quote name='Shaquil' timestamp='1347115335' post='4977987']
C++ is widely considered the "main" gaming language.
[/quote]You can't be more right !!
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