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Alan Greenspan

How do I make a game?

12 posts in this topic

Hey folks. I've had a lot of free time lately so I've been playing amazing games like Minecraft and Terraria, which have inspired me to make a game of my own. I was wondering how a passionate video game fan like myself could go about "crafting" some games. (See what I did there? lol). I have a lot of great ideas for truly EPIC games and want to start applying them to a sort of sandbox style game like the ones I mentioned.

Thanks a ton,
Alan

(PS I didn't know what topic prefix meant so I went with the one that sounded coolest.)
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Going with the coolest topic prefix is a dumb idea, you might want to stop doing things like that if you want results.

FYI Python is a programming language. Not one well suited to actually making games (can be done though, pygame and pyglet are a good start there) but its incredibly easy to learn and the knowledge gained applies to other languages.
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[quote name='Servant of the Lord' timestamp='1347246238' post='4978463']
You could start with Python (here's the Beginner's Guide). I hope you find it very enjoyable! It may seem confusing at first, but stick with it through the confusion, and it'll get very enjoyable (and more challenging) as time goes on.
[/quote]

Why would I use a language I've never heard of? Minecraft is living, breathing proof that Java is the best way to go, am I wrong?
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If you want to learn to "make" games, then you will need to be serious about learning. You're not going to write the next Minecraft, Total War, IL-2, ARMA or Call of Duty without several years of learning and practice -- and once you know how you need the time, financial/man-power resources and some business experience to make it happen. But that can all come to you from getting a job in the industry (once you learn), managing money wisely and learning, learning, learning! Most people who are in your position, just wanting to start off, end up giving up (probably 90% or more). The other 9% never make a good game... yet another 0.9% only make moderately successful or decent games, and only 0.01% end up making a multi-million dollar AAA-grade title. But if you know you have what it takes and you're serious about making it, don't let statistics scare you. Some of those "0.01%'ers" are hanging around these very forums! :-)

I recommend heartily that you go with C#, and start off learning with the XNA Framework. It will let you get your feet wet and show you how DirectX games are put together without making you kill yourself learning about low-level graphics programming.
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[quote name='Alan Greenspan' timestamp='1347323688' post='4978745']
Minecraft is living, breathing proof that Java is the best way to go, am I wrong?
[/quote]

Minecraft is living, breathing proof that Notch is a very capable programmer.
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[quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1347326371' post='4978751']
Python was used for EVE Online and Toontown Online
[/quote]

Sorry, but Toontown? Really?
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Sure - Toontown is a successful and profitable commercial MMORPG that has been operating for nearly a decade. You might not find the theme interesting or the art style -- and it IS a stylistic choice rather than any imposed limitation -- particularly impressive, but if you ever create a game even one-tenth as successful you would be doing well. I believe Disney also have an MMO built on the same technology with a Pirates of the Caribbean theme if that would be an example more to your taste.
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[quote name='Alan Greenspan' timestamp='1347342217' post='4978801']
[quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1347326371' post='4978751']
Python was used for EVE Online and Toontown Online
[/quote]

Sorry, but Toontown? Really?
[/quote]

You should stop looking at the visuals of the games (or whether you enjoy them or not), and start thinking about the architecture.
Toontown is a MMORPG that must support tons of players at once participating in different events in a 3D world (that was launched in 2003).
Minecraft (launched the online component in 2009), though more to your personal preference in terms of gameplay, supports a much smaller amount of people in a block-based world. And Minecraft still has (last time I played) entire chunks of the world that go missing from time to time that hasn't been resolved after three years.

Toontown is a greater feat of [i]engineering [/i](even though you may not like it's [i]design[/i]). Both games could've been programmed in either Python or Java, or any of a dozen other languages. Edited by Servant of the Lord
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I think with about 90% certainty that this guy is either
a) a troll
b) an idiot who just assumes that because minecraft is written in java its the best when you could argue that many many more successful games are written in C++
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