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Benjamin Jimenez

convert this moon ground pattern to 2d background

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Hi,

I'm new to 2D graphics, I am using Inkscape and want to convert this ground drawing in this picture to a 2D background. I don't want to copy it I want to make something from scratch with the same look as this one has. Any ideas on how to do it?

[img]http://www.acclaimimages.com/_gallery/_free_images/0124-1009-1514-5714_man_on_the_moon_astronaut_john_w_young_walks_on_the_moon_m.jpg[/img]

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I'm new to vector art myself, having only created one vector image, but this is what I did:[list]
[*]Import the reference image as a background layer
[*]Draw over it with your polygons and splines
[*]Hide the reference layer when finished
[/list]
To add the reference image: ([b]File -> Import -> <[i]select the file>[/i] -> Embed in file[/b])
To hide the reference image to view how it's coming along: ([b]Right-click image -> Object Properties -> Hide checkbox[/b])

([size=2]I was converting a hand-drawn logo into a nice vector image with gradient coloration - it took some time, but my reference image was alot simpler than yours[/size]) Edited by Servant of the Lord

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sunandshadow    7426
For this kind of thing you probably want to use a painting-like approach. First turn off lines, so you are drawing only blobs of color. Then use the eyedropper to grab the color that is most prevalent in the moon rock. Draw some sand dune/hill shapes with that. Now take a darker color and put that wherever shadows are. And take a lighter color and put it wherever highlights are. For greater realism, do a second level of both shadows and highlights.

Edit: aha I knew I had an example of this technique somewhere. Here is my Inkscape rendition of the Mona Lisa. I enlarged it so you could see the color areas better, it's not supposed to be displayed anywhere near this large.
[img]http://home.comcast.net/~wickeddelite/monalisa.png[/img] Edited by sunandshadow

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JTippetts    12950
Granted, I only have minimal time spent with Inkscape, but I really question if it's the appropriate tool for the job. That ground is an image with a ton of high-frequency detail. Granted, you have the occasional [url="http://www.flickr.com/photos/35772571@N03/"]freaky genius[/url] who attempts photo-realistic real world stuff with Inkscape, but for the rest of us I think it would just be too time consuming to do such a thing. Especially when you could achieve your desired result in a fraction of the time using some real-world dirt photographs and the Gimp, or some procedural materials and a rock-scattering particle system in Blender.

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[quote name='sunandshadow' timestamp='1347676545' post='4980265']
For this kind of thing you probably want to use a painting-like approach. First turn off lines, so you are drawing only blobs of color. Then use the eyedropper to grab the color that is most prevalent in the moon rock. Draw some sand dune/hill shapes with that. Now take a darker color and put that wherever shadows are. And take a lighter color and put it wherever highlights are. For greater realism, do a second level of both shadows and highlights.

Edit: aha I knew I had an example of this technique somewhere. Here is my Inkscape rendition of the Mona Lisa. I enlarged it so you could see the color areas better, it's not supposed to be displayed anywhere near this large.
[img]http://home.comcast.net/~wickeddelite/monalisa.png[/img]
[/quote]

Yes, what I want is not a realistic version in Inkscape, but a cartoon type transformation, but with a little detail it like some shadows and some rocks scattered around. Not sure if I can do the sink hole looking formations where rocks have impacted the ground, but something cool looking would be nice. I'll see about turning off lines, i've never done that before.

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