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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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DominicHughes

finding information on DirectX 10 is Difficult...?

6 posts in this topic

Hello I've been programming for almost 3 years and having troubles finding simple and basic information on DirectX 10 for example a simple basic directx 10 window?

I've looked around on Google with results that show me what I don't want to see... like I've never used Classes before in my games I've programmed and having to deciper through someones uses of classes is very agitating.

I looked at the SDK examples and found usefull stuff but no nice descriptions and it would just be nicer if someone had a site or some kind of book that explained how to setup and use DirectX 10 with mingw32 I'm having issues with the makefile setup process includes/lib folders for some reason when I shouldn't be...???


Makefile
[CODE]
all: 3DGameProgramming
3DGameProgramming: main.cpp
mingw32-g++ main.cpp -o 3DGP -lmingw32 -lwinmm -ld3d9 -mwindows -I"C:\\Program Files\\Microsoft DirectX SDK (June 2010)\\Include" -L"C:\\Program Files\\Microsoft DirectX SDK (June 2010)\\Lib"
# this is optional, but it's nice
.PHONY: all
[/CODE]


like in SDL you can find a basic SDL window example..

so if anyone knows anything about DirectX 10 and Mingw32 setups or knows where to find simple basic information on DirectX 10 let me know thank you ! ;]
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Use MSDN and Google to find information on Direct3D 10.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb205067(v=vs.85).aspx
https://janvdl.com/showthread.php?521-DirectX-10-Tutorial-Series

Install Visual C++ to compile a DirectX app. Microsoft does not allow redistribution of their SDKs, so any MingW version you are using is against the EULA. Also, it's a pain in the ass to get working, as you've seen. It works out of the box with the Visual C++ compiler.
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Take a look at our D3D10 book - it is free, and should be approximately what you are looking for. The link is below in my signature...
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The way I learned that window thingi is on the directxSDK in the directx 10 tutorial 0. click start > search "directx Documentation for C++" > look for samples and tutorial, then go to directx 10 tutorials. the tutorial 0 is about win32 basics.
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Also, you should get to know how classes work, and be comfortable with them. What languages have you been using ?

Object oriented programming is a fundamental concept in programming that really shouldn't agitate you. Maybe get a book on C++ as well and start trying to make sense of what's in there, and practice building some classes. I promise you that they are not hard to use once you get used to them. And you will think in terms of objects & classes all the time once you do.
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I sopose I will switch to using Microsoft Visual Studio then but I really don't know if i like it enough but o well I gotta do what I gotta do so from now on I will just use Visual Studio oh and gavin williams you are right in some ways but I just don't like classes there just too object orientated and make it alot of work for each member of a class ;/
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Programming is 'a lot of work', oo just helps you organize that work. I assume you're using C++ in an imperative style, so you'll have variables and functions that work on those variables. A class simply collects those variables and their associated functions (that you've already written) together in a 'container', it has a number of advantages such as encapsulation, the wiki introduces encapsulation like this :

In a programming language, encapsulation is used to refer to one of two related but distinct notions, and sometimes to the combination[1][2] thereof:
* A language mechanism for restricting access to some of the object's components.
* A language construct that facilitates the bundling of data with the methods (or other functions) operating on that data.

Those seem to me to be very sensible side-effects of using OO. All that extra work is really just work you're doing anyway, you're just moving it somewhere more sensible. The skeleton of a class (the code you have to write to contain it and expose it to the rest of your program ) is trivial.

Anyway, you should do what you're comfortable with for the moment, you'll probably have more fun exploring graphics programming. Just think about how classes might help organize larger projects as you start writing them. I'm sure you'll be writing code one day, and you'll stop and think 'hey .. i remember when i didn't like object oriented programming. And you'll have written a thousand classes' :)

I absolutely promise you that it becomes second nature, and i'm no programming guru or anything.
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