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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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kgeorgiadis

Creating an adventure game as a final project for college

4 posts in this topic

Hello all, its my first post here. I'm in a computer engineering and informatics college and next year I will have to do a big final project(supposed to take 6 months usually but I'm fine with it if it takes longer than that).

I was thinking about making something like an adventure game like the many many old SCUMM ones. And just maybe if I finish it it might even sell.(considering the success of Gemini Rue recently I at least have hopes.. maybe it will take more than a year and I'll have to make interesting characters/story/puzzles but still... its a possibility)

I have a couple questions... is it possible to do this in roughly a year(I'll try to find 2-3 people to help with sounds and art)? I found this http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/how-do-i-make-games-a-path-to-game-development-r892

thread and I'll definitely try doing this during this year to prepare so I won't go into it right off the bat.

My more important questions though are... how useful would it be in order to find a job later as a game programmer? On one hand I feel like I will learn plenty of things. On the other I wonder if a lot of them are too outdated and I'd be better off doing something else that would require an equal amount of time.

Last question is once I'm done with school and supposing I finished this product and it's rather decent, how do you go about actually finding a job? Almost everywhere I've looked they all seem to require past 2-3 years of experience in the field or having worked on another released decent game. How can you actually do that if they all won't accept you(at least according to what they say is basic "requirements" to hire you)?

Seeing as those 2-3 first few years are the most crucial ones I'd very much appreciate some guidance.

Thanks for your replies,
Konstantinos
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[quote name='kgeorgiadis' timestamp='1348266667' post='4982522']
1. is it possible to do this in roughly a year
2. how useful would it be in order to find a job later as a game programmer?
3. On one hand I feel like I will learn plenty of things. On the other I wonder if a lot of them are too outdated and I'd be better off doing something else that would require an equal amount of time.
4. Last question is once I'm done with school and supposing I finished this product and it's rather decent, how do you go about actually finding a job?
5. Almost everywhere I've looked they all seem to require past 2-3 years of experience in the field or having worked on another released decent game. How can you actually do that if they all won't accept you(at least according to what they say is basic "requirements" to hire you)?
[/quote]
1. This question goes outside the topic of this forum. Ask this question in another forum (For Beginners is recommended).
2. Not very useful. School projects do not make a good portfolio. [url="http://www.igda.org/games-game-may-2012"]http://www.igda.org/...s-game-may-2012[/url]
3. Of course you'll learn lots. But it's silly to worry about those lessons being outdated, and "I don't want to waste my time" is covered in this forum's FAQs.
4. See this forum's FAQs. Back out to the forum's main page, and look at upper right.
5. Those ads are for experienced people. You need to stop reading those ads, and just look for entry-level positions.

[Edits]
2. You definitely should make a game. But your portfolio won't be finished thereby.
3. Do it to learn. Then make more stuff. Don't worry about whether the technology is outdated, and don't worry about wasting your time. Just do it. Edited by Tom Sloper
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Thanks for the reply! I found the FAQ(didn't see it at first since in forums they are usually a sticky) and it answered a lot of my questions and others I didn't post here.
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[quote name='kgeorgiadis' timestamp='1348297337' post='4982597']
I found the FAQ(didn't see it at first since in forums they are usually a sticky)
[/quote]

That gives me an idea. Thanks.
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Tom answered most (if not all) of the questions already, but I felt that I should add:

Most undergraduate projects require approval by a professor (I don't know what your school's rules are), each with their own idea of what is and isn't acceptible. You will likely need to present what you intend to build for your project in order to gain approval. Perhaps it would be best to run ideas by your favourite professors ahead of time. Some professors won't like game projects and some won't mind (they tend to steer students towards projects in their personal areas of interest).

The professor grading my project was reluctant to allow me to build a basic 3D modeling program, but he ended up liking the final product. Your professors might be able to suggest a reasonable scope to target for your project (although you coming up with a detailed schedule with some buffer room will help your do the same).
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