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SuperVGA

Preferred development OS (Desktop/Laptop).


61 posts in this topic

Just today, while I was working on our apps, I realized how much I'd rather work on another platform than the one I was using.
I came to think of, most of us must have some sort of bias.

-Or a preference based on experience. I have, but I won't mention it right away, I'd rather see what you guys think.

Note: This is not about target platform, but development platform.
And it's strictly about the experience of using IDEs, file managers and other applications related to everyday development.
Price and hardware is not in the picture.

I'd like to apologize if this belongs in the lounge. It's pretty casual, -and might just be the most casual post I've ever posted.
I'm just not sure about it.
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I would prefer to develop on Windows. My experiences are very limited, as I have not had any chances to try out Mac OS X or completely developing apps in a Linux environment. It would be beneficial if only schools outside of USA would actually receive fundings, regardless of whether the school is good or bad.
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This might be better in the Lounge - anyway, it depends on what I'm doing. If i'm writing low-level C code, definitely Linux, it feels much more comfortable and easier to develop on. However, for mostly anything else, Windows is my first choice, either because the Linux graphics drivers are just not mature enough (although that is rare, but it can happen), or I need Windows-specific tools such as OpenCL shader debuggers, that kind of specialized stuff, which quite simply do not exist for Linux. Although I am probably biased in that I've used Windows for many more years than I've used Linux.

As for overall development flow, it's more or less the same. I mean, the operating system's interface is mostly identical (desktop with icons.. check.. taskbar.. check.. most used applications.. check..) so when it comes to just *using* the OS to accomplish tasks, it's pretty much equivalent. I mean, Code::Blocks is literally identical on both platforms, which makes it awesome when I need to check my code's portability - I can reuse the project file painlessly instead of screwing around with makefiles.

And I like to game and dislike the idea of playing in a virtual machine or having to dualboot every time I want to have a quick round, which makes Windows my primary operating system regardless. And, yes, I admit it, I am not a hardcore tux and do not feel in control when using a Linux box, so I'd rather have my stuff stashed away on my Windows operating system - this is probably just a perceptual bias due to habits, though (inb4 flamewar) Edited by Bacterius
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I prefer *nix because it's so easy to install tools, languages, etc. "sudo apt-get install python" and you can program in Python. You get my point. It's also very easy to combine a big range of different technologies into something.
I've been programming a lot on Windows/Visual Studio, but I "switched" to mainly coding on OS X and Linux (when I get a reasonable choice). Thus, my preference is not a product of inexperience. Edited by patrrr
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I guess it's because I've grown up with dos and then windows, that I find the OSX user interface,
file manager and general administration of my projects less comfortable than on windows.
The iOS simulator is great, but i think xcode is a pretty bad IDE. Maybe it's all the more or less useless animations, or perhaps it's default way to manage source files.
I'm not quite sure. But i like eclipse, netbeans and code::blocks way better. And VS, too.
I'm used to batch scripting in windows, and utilize cmd commands, shortcuts and environment variables to a high extent, and that's great.

Everytime i code on a nix machine though, I feel empowered when writing bash scripts. -Is there anything you can't do from within a bash script? :)
And the fact that my favourite free IDEs are available for linux also, is nice. O agree with patrrr that it's great to just apt-get, when you need to add something new,
but I'm a minimalist, and i quickly lose track of what the different packages do and where they go. I use MSYS, GTK+ and MingW, and i can set it up from scratch with no installers whatsoever.

OSX just feels so prisonish somehow, -like I have rocket powered rollerblades but is presented with a field of sand.

I'm probably pretty similar to Bacterius in terms of platform preference. - But i hope we are not starting a flamewar here, that was'nt the intention.
The intention was to make a statistic... Of sorts.
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Because Windows is pretty much the OS I've always used and been accustomed to, I'm going to have to say that I voted for Windows.

However, that's not to say that developing on Mac or Linux is [i]bad[/i].

It's good to explore on different operating systems, and if you become a professional developer you will likely benefit from development experience on all of the top three OSes(okay, Linux is a kernel, not really an "[i]OS[/i]" like Mac or Windows, but you get it).

For example, Windows programmers who develop specifically with DirectX software are barring themselves away from Mac and Linux(at least as of now).

Of course, you can develop on one platform for all others, but there will be differences in the API/GDI/GUI/kernel/etc. So adjustments will probably have to be made regardless(how much depends on what program you write).

Desktop/laptops make no real significant difference in development, I'd say. It's what OS you use and the hardware you have that lets you know what's what.

The IDEs usually don't make much difference to me because I really focus on the results more than the experience of development as a goal, but I do think Code::Blocks is okay.

Final thought: try all of them, but you can always stick more with the one you like best for whichever reasons. Edited by Pointer2APointer
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[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1348487021' post='4983185']
I came to think of, most of us must have some sort of bias.[/quote]
[b]Everyone[/b] is biased. What exactly do you hope to get out of this, if everybody just lists their personal preferences?
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348516564' post='4983335']
[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1348487021' post='4983185']
I came to think of, most of us must have some sort of bias.[/quote]
[b]Everyone[/b] is biased. What exactly do you hope to get out of this, if everybody just lists their personal preferences?
[/quote]
Their personal preferences...

[quote name='tom_mai78101' timestamp='1348551035' post='4983460']
I think he just wants the statistics for how biased the operating systems were to developers.
[/quote]
-Exactly. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

Edit: Just discovered how I forgot to change the title when i settled on a "proper" topic.
It's the development platform not the target, - can I change that myself? Edited by SuperVGA
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[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1348514085' post='4983322']
OSX just feels so prisonish somehow, -like I have rocket powered rollerblades but is presented with a field of sand.
[/quote]

That's what I feel when I'm in Windows, +1 on everyone's biased.
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[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1348556379' post='4983486']
[quote name='tom_mai78101' timestamp='1348551035' post='4983460']
I think he just wants the statistics for how biased the operating systems were to developers.[/quote]
-Exactly. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img][/quote]
So in other words, you are just polling the OS preference of GameDev members?

Welcome to the lounge.
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Within the last year I've started developing using arch linux with dwm and vim. Mostly C and Go atm. I find that using the command line tools and vim is what I like. I don't mess with icons, I don't mess with file managers, I don't mess with menus. I can actually do everything from the keyboard without ever using the mouse. Infact, other than my browser, I can do all my coding over a simple ssh login, or without starting xwindows at all. Even while in xwindows, dwm has no need for a mouse, and I'm using vimium for chromium to reduce my need of a mouse there. Dwm is a tiling window manager, which is very helpful when using documentation or reference material.

There's much more to add, but I really enjoy my development environment. Everything at your fingertips.
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348585743' post='4983602']
So in other words, you are just polling the OS preference of GameDev members?

Welcome to the lounge.
[/quote]
Thank you mr. Swift :)

[quote name='Scienthsine' timestamp='1348586218' post='4983605']
Within the last year I've started developing using arch linux with dwm and vim..
...
Everything at your fingertips[/quote]
I wish i had the patience to learn vim. Everytime i get started on it,
I get confused about the key combinations.
But i really enjoy not having to use the mouse.
It's often much slower than a hitting a couple of keys.
With regards to scripting, I do that too, and associate the scripts with shortcut keys.
Wroooummm!

[quote name='kunos' timestamp='1348586605' post='4983607']
I'd be lost without VS, so Windows for sure.
[/quote]
When I switched from vs6 to vs2003 (i think it was),
I was annoyed with intellisense, which as a feature i enjoyed, took so long rebuildong its index.
Today i use vs2010 on a daily basis at work. And it's pretty fast, but i often feel that i can do with less...
Have you ever tried a smaller IDE that you feel you can compare to vs in terms of comfort?
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In a perfect world? Visual Studio on OSX! Mainly because power management and the touchpad are so much better on OSX than Windows.
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[quote name='tstrimple' timestamp='1348589234' post='4983621']
In a perfect world? Visual Studio on OSX! Mainly because power management and the touchpad are so much better on OSX than Windows.
[/quote]
Can't you just run parallels, then?
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Windows(xp or win 7) for sure. Ubuntu is fine for small projects but no more than that. Mac OS???? Well perhaps I should try it one day when I need to port a game to mac machines... For now it is not necessary.
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[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1348588479' post='4983617']
Have you ever tried a smaller IDE that you feel you can compare to vs in terms of comfort?
[/quote]

QTCreator perhaps, but I haven't done any big project in it, but at least I never felt lost like with things like XCode or Eclipse.
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[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1348589373' post='4983623']
[quote name='tstrimple' timestamp='1348589234' post='4983621']
In a perfect world? Visual Studio on OSX! Mainly because power management and the touchpad are so much better on OSX than Windows.
[/quote]
Can't you just run parallels, then?
[/quote]

That solves the trackpad issues, but definitely not the battery issue since I now run an entire operating system just for Visual Studio.
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[quote name='tstrimple' timestamp='1348591410' post='4983638']
[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1348589373' post='4983623']
[quote name='tstrimple' timestamp='1348589234' post='4983621']
In a perfect world? Visual Studio on OSX! Mainly because power management and the touchpad are so much better on OSX than Windows.
[/quote]
Can't you just run parallels, then?
[/quote]

That solves the trackpad issues, but definitely not the battery issue since I now run an entire operating system just for Visual Studio.
[/quote]
I didn't think you meant that the battery thing was an issue, but an advantage of OSX.
The touchpad thing has got to be a hardware thing, so maybe you could do with boot camp? ;)
Then you're down to strict hardware-sided advantages.
(although i think the power saving features in win 7 are pretty decent.
Maybe it isn't as much an OSX thing as it is a macbook thing...)
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[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1348592971' post='4983645']
The touchpad thing has got to be a hardware thing, so maybe you could do with boot camp? ;)[/quote]
Despite running on the same hardware, Windows support for these trackpads sucks (even with the Bootcamp drivers). Windows just doesn't fluidly support the type of gross multi-touch gestures used on the Mac.

[quote](although i think the power saving features in win 7 are pretty decent.
Maybe it isn't as much an OSX thing as it is a macbook thing...)[/quote]
It's largely a question of closed hardware. Apple gets to optimize Mac OS performance for each individual hardware revision, whereas Windows 7 has to run on pretty much every hardware under the sun.
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348597132' post='4983667']
[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1348592971' post='4983645']
The touchpad thing has got to be a hardware thing, so maybe you could do with boot camp? ;)[/quote]
Despite running on the same hardware, Windows support for these trackpads sucks (even with the Bootcamp drivers). Windows just doesn't fluidly support the type of gross multi-touch gestures used on the Mac.
[/quote]

Right. The Macbook touchpads and drivers are sublime. Far and away better than anything available on a Windows laptop.

[quote][quote](although i think the power saving features in win 7 are pretty decent.
Maybe it isn't as much an OSX thing as it is a macbook thing...)[/quote]
It's largely a question of closed hardware. Apple gets to optimize Mac OS performance for each individual hardware revision, whereas Windows 7 has to run on pretty much every hardware under the sun.
[/quote]

Yep. Hopefully with Microsoft putting out some hardware now they will be able to address this to some extent. OSX gets fantastic battery life for the performance offered.

I'm not a fan of the general use of OSX. Finder is complete rubbish for instance and the bundled calendar and address book are hilariously bad. Most of Apple's design sense seems to end at the hardware level.

I am currently using the Macbook Pro in bootcamp, and the battery life isn't nearly as good and the laptop gets much warmer than when running OSX. I also really miss the three finger drag which is far more usable than trying to double tap and drag windows.
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[quote name='tstrimple' timestamp='1348607395' post='4983746']
I'm not a fan of the general use of OSX. Finder is complete rubbish for instance and the bundled calendar and address book are hilariously bad. Most of Apple's design sense seems to end at the hardware level.[/quote]
Hah. Every time I boot my Windows box, I want to tear my hair out [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

Why can't it all be as fluid and simple as my Mac? Where, oh where, is column view? Why doesn't the desktop have multiple spaces? Why isn't fullscreen mode cleanly integrated? Why can't I horizontally resize the terminal window? Why does a clean install leave me without an ethernet driver? WHY OH WHY... OH MY GOD ITS JUST TOO AWFUL.

Yeah. So that happened.
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