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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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SuperVGA

Preferred development OS (Desktop/Laptop).


61 posts in this topic

[quote name='ic0de' timestamp='1350001825' post='4989321']I break out DOS and Turbo C++ every once in a while[/quote]If you had stopped there, you would have won the thread. :P
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[quote name='SuperVGA' timestamp='1349987975' post='4989251']
[quote name='Drakonka' timestamp='1349959260' post='4989078']
I work on my Mac (running Lion) and play on my Windows PC (currently waiting to be rebuilt after a move). But then, I work with JavaScript and HTML5 which allows plenty of flexibility in terms of what OS one prefers. I just prefer using OS X for most activities. Because the development environment isn't really hardware intensive I can work comfortably on a MacBook Air and carry it everywhere with me, working in coffee shops, parks, etc if I feel like it.
[/quote]
Well safari is pretty sweet, and there are a lot of nice editors to write html and js in,
so i can understand you. For the web and creative stuff a macbook is ok for me too.
[/quote]

I mostly use Chrome Canary until I'm testing browser compatibility, but yeah :) Canary + Sublime Text 2 + coffee shop.
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MacBook...baah, I could buy around 4 equally performant laptops and install OSX86 onto.
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[quote name='derda4' timestamp='1350050203' post='4989463']
MacBook...baah, I could buy around 4 equally performant laptops and install OSX86 onto.[/quote]
I'd love to see some numbers to back that assertion up.

The cheapest "equally performant" laptop I can find is the HP DV7T at $900, but that comes with an anaemic 1600x900 display resolution - even though you could buy [b]two (and only 2)[/b] of those for the price of the Retina MacBook, I'd argue that the retina display is well worth the $1,300 price premium (and I'd never even consider a 17" laptop with less than 1080p resolution).
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1349009072' post='4985338']
[quote name='slicer4ever' timestamp='1348997827' post='4985303']
umm....how often do u buy windows?[/quote]
Once per machine, if you are doing things the legal way. You are also implicitly buying Windows every time you buy a PC.

I have quite a number of Windows licenses lying around. Boxed set of Windows 3.1, anyone?
[/quote]
I'll take it, if you still have all the activation codes - you wouldn't believe how hard it is to get "vintage" games I grew up with to run on a modern OS.

The "programming environment" I use the most currently is Eclipse Indigo, how ever that is subject to change with whatever I happen to be doing.
The OS I prefer is Windows - mostly owing to it having so many more toys / tools I can work with, [b]AND[/b] compatibility with the most resources.
I very rarely use Mac, and only use Linux when forced to ( good gods, when will 1980's style computing die?! ). Edited by Shippou
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[quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1350053087' post='4989479']
I'll take it, if you still have all the activation codes - you wouldn't believe how hard it is to get "vintage" games I grew up with to run on a modern OS.
[/quote]
If the hardware is too modern note that you can always use a virtual machine, which (hopefully) has compatible drivers. I boot up Windows 95 in Virtualbox and indulge in some retro gaming every now and then. I had to get a third-party graphics driver but other than that, works well (as far as 95 goes, anyway).
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[quote name='Bacterius' timestamp='1350053347' post='4989482']
[quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1350053087' post='4989479']
I'll take it, if you still have all the activation codes - you wouldn't believe how hard it is to get "vintage" games I grew up with to run on a modern OS.
[/quote]
If the hardware is too modern note that you can always use a virtual machine, which (hopefully) has compatible drivers. I boot up Windows 95 in Virtualbox and indulge in some retro gaming every now and then. I had to get a third-party graphics driver but other than that, works well (as far as 95 goes, anyway).
[/quote]
I use [url="http://www.dosbox.com"]DosBox[/url], however there are games that will not run even on that.
If I had the time ( and money ), there would be a computer for every major OS at my place - starting with the [url="http://computermuseum.50megs.com/brands/ti994a.htm"]TI-99[/url] and [url="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_oOS9kksMHmM/TGFArJt6S1I/AAAAAAAAAJw/6lWDrQY8QuA/s1600/atari1040st.jpg"]Atari SE[/url]
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1350052829' post='4989477']
I'd argue that the retina display is well worth the $1,300 price premium
[/quote]
I'll have a look at the local dealer...but hey it would need to be huge for me to support a patent troll.

[quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1350053087' post='4989479']
only use Linux when forced to ( good gods, when will 1980's style computing die
[/quote]
Not possible...nobody cares if you buy stuff instead.

[quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1350056178' post='4989496']
I use DosBox, however there are games that will not run even on that.
[/quote]
I run Rage, Wolfenstein, Photoshop etc. in Wine 1.4 on Ubuntu.
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[quote name='derda4' timestamp='1350107843' post='4989686']
but hey it would need to be huge for me to support a patent troll.[/quote]
What, and every other tech company doesn't do the same? It's how the game is played - if you don't like it, go back to using an abacus [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img]
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I made two OS for my personal use. For desktop I made one pretty much indistinguishable from Windows 7, and for my netbook, I made another indistinguishable from Debian.

I also had to remake Eclipse and a JRE for each OS too, it was such a chore but such is the price for having a custom development environment.
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Was planning on using Windows... but... I only have CD's for XP, and I only have a license for Media Center Edition.
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