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superman3275

My Philosophy

59 posts in this topic

[quote]It is not your aptitude but your attitude that determines your altitude.[/quote] [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/wink.png[/img]
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[quote name='ShadowValence' timestamp='1348627824' post='4983846']
[quote]It is not your aptitude but your attitude that determines your altitude.[/quote] [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/wink.png[/img]
[/quote]
I agree completely! (HIGH FIVE)
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Playing games, fantasizing, and enjoying the learning are the major areas for my passion. I suppose there might be some out there who hate the technicalities but I consume them! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img] Even the frustrations are welcome because the resistance to my creativity has many benefits.

I feel, also, that a person can to some extent increase or decrease the passion by choice and the thoughts one decides to hold. Ever picked yourself off the mental ground, smacked the dust, and got back in the saddle with a smile and said something like " Okay, let's give it another round." ? [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]


Fireskull Edited by 3Ddreamer
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Interesting ideology, though some folks who responded are lucky enough to get into a field they like, and are fortunate they can pick and choose.

It's a dog-eat-dog world, were very few folks end up making a living doing what they enjoy doing.
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[quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1348680441' post='4984026']
It's a dog-eat-dog world, were very few folks end up making a living doing what they enjoy doing.[/quote]
Bullshit. If you are lucky enough to be born in a first world country, and to be able to afford a decent education, then the only thing stopping you from making a living in a field you enjoy, is your own poor choices.
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348681600' post='4984028']
[quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1348680441' post='4984026']
It's a dog-eat-dog world, were very few folks end up making a living doing what they enjoy doing.[/quote]
Bullshit. If you are lucky enough to be born in a first world country, and to be able to afford a decent education, then the only thing stopping you from making a living in a field you enjoy, is your own poor choices.
[/quote]
Which leads to this philosophy... "The Man can bring you down. But it's your choice to stay there."
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348681600' post='4984028']
If you are lucky enough to be born in a first world country, and to be able to afford a decent education, then the only thing stopping you from making a living in a field you enjoy, is your own poor choices.
[/quote]

[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/dry.png[/img]

Yea, I mean, it's not like we have to deal with external factors that are simply beyond our control. /src
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348681600' post='4984028']
[quote name='Shippou' timestamp='1348680441' post='4984026']
It's a dog-eat-dog world, were very few folks end up making a living doing what they enjoy doing.[/quote]
Bullshit. If you are lucky enough to be born in a first world country, and to be able to afford a decent education, then the only thing stopping you from making a living in a field you enjoy, is your own poor choices.
[/quote]

Or the unemployment rate and the nation's economic situation [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/wink.png[/img]
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[quote name='Dwarf King' timestamp='1348698079' post='4984143']
Or the unemployment rate and the nation's economic situation [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/wink.png[/img][/quote]
I have a hard time feeling sorry for all my classmates who chose to major in classical literature, and are now out of work. It was pretty evident that there were no jobs in that field long before they decided on their major.

The ones who did it out of love for the subject, and actually worked towards a goal? Most of them have jobs.

Unemployment is a sad fact of reality for many people, but the affluent kids with college degrees by-and-large made their own bed to sleep in. Edited by swiftcoder
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When I saw the title of this thread, I thought, "Oh good grief, not another lengthy post about someone's bizarre world-view". But then it turned out to be a thread with a short OP about doing things you like because you like doing them, even when you hate doing them. And that's pretty cool.

[quote name='Bregma' timestamp='1348665492' post='4983968']<br />Most of the people I knew in high school who went into a field 'for the money' dropped out within a few years and went into a completely different field [b](often real estate sales, for some reason)[/b]. Some did that, then gave in and followed their passion in their 30s or 40s, and missed some good years of doing what they want. Many had no passion and just fell in to some job they're unhappy with and counting the days until they can retire on full pension.[/quote]
Ah, real estate. People really bought it that the value of this one type of asset, unlike any other, will always go up. That is not investment. That's more descriptive of a Ponzi scheme, but especially into the late 90s and early millenium, people greedily drank from "Rich Dad"'s Kool-Aid. That really turned out well, didn't it?

(edit: For the record, I also know that the roots of the real estate crash go far deeper than the line of books by Robert Kiyosaki, so that's a really specific shot at him and maybe a little unfair. People like Kiyosaki are the face of that crisis, but in the higher echelons, people like Angelo Mozilo are worse. Even the application of Ayn Rand's ideology by her pupil, Alan Greenspan, has been just great for the world around us. But all in all, that says nothing of the greed that drove individual home owners to borrow way more than they could repay, buy way more house than they needed, and bankrupt their own futures and those of entire neighborhoods. That was their call.) Edited by Heath
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348698973' post='4984149']

The ones who did it out of love for the subject, and actually worked towards a goal? Most of them have jobs.
[/quote]

This. A hundred times over. There's a huge lack of programmers in my country. Yet, the unpassioned (and frankly, shitty) programmers I went to school with still remain unemployed.
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348698973' post='4984149']
Unemployment is a sad fact of reality for many people, but the affluent kids with college degrees by-and-large made their own bed to sleep in.
[/quote]

How exactly do you define "affluent" in this context?

If you're referring to people who simply went to college, than your concept of affluence is truly bizarre.

Whatever the case may be: Shippou didn't bring up "college", or the present market value of one degree over another. He simply pointed out that "very few folks end up making a living doing what they enjoy doing", which is plainly true.

[quote name='Amadeus H' timestamp='1348727926' post='4984247']
There's a huge lack of programmers in my country.
[/quote]

I doubt that.

There's a huge lack of *expert* programmers, which is what everyone is looking to hire.
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[quote name='Goran Milovanovic' timestamp='1348737718' post='4984291']
I doubt that.

There's a huge lack of *expert* programmers, which is what everyone is looking to hire.
[/quote]

You are free to doubt it. Though I disagree with the term expert. They're looking for programmers that show promise- and that ties in to what Swiftcoder already has said, and what I wanted to emphasize.
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348681600' post='4984028']
Bullshit. If you are lucky enough to be born in a first world country, and to be able to afford a decent education, then the only thing stopping you from making a living in a field you enjoy, is your own poor choices.
[/quote]

An interesting tidbit: Sweden's a third world country. Edited by patrrr
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348698973' post='4984149']
[quote name='Dwarf King' timestamp='1348698079' post='4984143']
Or the unemployment rate and the nation's economic situation [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/wink.png[/img][/quote]
I have a hard time feeling sorry for all my classmates who chose to major in classical literature, and are now out of work. It was pretty evident that there were no jobs in that field long before they decided on their major.

The ones who did it out of love for the subject, and actually worked towards a goal? Most of them have jobs.

Unemployment is a sad fact of reality for many people, but the affluent kids with college degrees by-and-large made their own bed to sleep in.
[/quote]

With all respect Sir, then I do not believe you know how hard the financial crisis hit the first world countries. Also remember that some people did sadly not grew up in a environment where going to school was the goal. Drug abusers also get kids, alcoholics get kids and these people must struggle hard to overcome the violence and abuse they encountered in their childhood. Do not say that we are all born equal with the same starting point. I was lucky enough to be born in a nice family but many sadly did not.

Also regarding the choice of college degrees then perhaps you would notice that around 15-17 percent graduated economists are unemployed, engineers(non IT majors) also find it harder to find jobs and so on. Only we the coders/software dudes seem to be in luck at the moment(I just turned down down a job as a programmer offer the other day). When a society lacks money it will lack jobs.

No philosophy can change that. In countries like Spain, Portugal and Greece(in Greece life important medicine is hard to get now due to high prices and lower financially gov support) the population with or without degrees must face the cruel reality of salary cut downs everyday and the prices of gods do not necessarily decrease for the moment.

Your standpoint shows that you lack economical skills to comprehend the seriousness of this financial crisis and the impact it has on the population of EU citizens. You also lack the social science skills to comprehend how social inheritance affect the outcome of a human being as he/she grow up. Theses skills are a must for people who wish to understand human behavior and how a society works.

You should also know that a person who ONLY love literature and hate math and codes never would feel home at a CS department(in most cases). Try to put Tolkien at a computer science department... We do also need people who can write literature and stories(also for movies, computer games and TV) in the future. We also need translators and teachers in the future.

Okay that was a long post, but I felt it was necessary to correct you on these issues. After all I have been dealing with these problems(financial crises and their impact on a society) during my minor in economics and it simply just hurts my eyes each time a person decides to tell people that if only they choose the right choice then they will succeed... Never gonna happen as this is the real world where the rules of supply and demand and global free competition rules. Welcome to the real and brutal world where jobs are outsourced and the size of salary also has a voice [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img]

Their is only one rule back and that is "the person who has the ability to press the "shift" button will succeed". Not all can do this(due to family, lack of money or illness etc.) and so they must face a lot of hardship. Edited by Dwarf King
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[quote name='Saruman' timestamp='1348669793' post='4983986']
It is [i]currently[/i] impossible to purchase time with money... therefore make sure you spend your time wisely rather than trading it for something that can be accrued easily. I've always lived by that rule and will only work on projects that I find interesting and that have great opportunities for learning new things.
[/quote]

Thanks.
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[quote name='Dwarf King' timestamp='1348746240' post='4984318']
[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348698973' post='4984149']
[quote name='Dwarf King' timestamp='1348698079' post='4984143']
Or the unemployment rate and the nation's economic situation [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/wink.png[/img][/quote]
I have a hard time feeling sorry for all my classmates who chose to major in classical literature, and are now out of work. It was pretty evident that there were no jobs in that field long before they decided on their major.

The ones who did it out of love for the subject, and actually worked towards a goal? Most of them have jobs.

Unemployment is a sad fact of reality for many people, but the affluent kids with college degrees by-and-large made their own bed to sleep in.
[/quote]

With all respect Sir, then I do not believe you know how hard the financial crisis hit the first world countries. Also remember that some people did sadly not grew up in a environment where going to school was the goal. Drug abusers also get kids, alcoholics get kids and these people must struggle hard to overcome the violence and abuse they encountered in their childhood. Do not say that we are all born equal with the same starting point. I was lucky enough to be born in a nice family but many sadly did not.

Also regarding the choice of college degrees then perhaps you would notice that around 15-17 percent graduated economists are unemployed, engineers(non IT majors) also find it harder to find jobs and so on. Only we the coders/software dudes seem to be in luck at the moment(I just turned down down a job as a programmer offer the other day). When a society lacks money it will lack jobs.

No philosophy can change that. In countries like Spain, Portugal and Greece(in Greece life important medicine is hard to get now due to high prices and lower financially gov support) the population with or without degrees must face the cruel reality of salary cut downs everyday and the prices of gods do not necessarily decrease for the moment.

Your standpoint shows that you lack economical skills to comprehend the seriousness of this financial crisis and the impact it has on the population of EU citizens. You also lack the social science skills to comprehend how social inheritance affect the outcome of a human being as he/she grow up. Theses skills are a must for people who wish to understand human behavior and how a society works.

You should also know that a person who ONLY love literature and hate math and codes never would feel home at a CS department(in most cases). Try to put Tolkien at a computer science department... We do also need people who can write literature and stories(also for movies, computer games and TV) in the future. We also need translators and teachers in the future.

Okay that was a long post, but I felt it was necessary to correct you on these issues. After all I have been dealing with these problems(financial crises and their impact on a society) during my minor in economics and it simply just hurts my eyes each time a person decides to tell people that if only they choose the right choice then they will succeed... Never gonna happen as this is the real world where the rules of supply and demand and global free competition rules. Welcome to the real and brutal world where jobs are outsourced and the size of salary also has a voice [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img]

Their is only one rule back and that is "the person who has the ability to press the "shift" button will succeed". Not all can do this(due to family, lack of money or illness etc.) and so they must face a lot of hardship.
[/quote]

This. Times ten.

I read a lot and experience a lot, and I agree with you completely.

For example, there is a thread at cgtalk.com where someone mention that due to out sourcing, even good westerner 3d artist, in order to survive, have to move to India, etc.

In other word, since the job is outsourced there, and your skill is in that area, might as well as work there, at their salary point, and living condition. Its either that or being jobless. Besides, are we already forgotten (even though I'm not American) the moment IT outsourcing was become huge? Jobless programmers everywhere. (previously, technology and belief is causing IT job to stay in country. But after realizing that Indian programmer is as good, if not better, at lower salary point, suddenly IT outsourcing is a huge boom that programmers is getting pink slip everywhere).

So, to people who have been living in the ivory tower and travelling on the high horse, please wear other people shoe too. Thanks.
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[quote name='Dwarf King' timestamp='1348746240' post='4984318']
You should also know that a person who ONLY love literature and hate math and codes never would feel home at a CS department(in most cases). Try to put Tolkien at a computer science department...[/quote]
Tolkien was also a theoretical linguist - I imagine he'd have been quite at home in a CS department. Does the name 'Noam Chomsky' ring any bells?

The majority of computer science is [b]not [/b]about 'math and codes'.

[quote]it simply just hurts my eyes each time a person decides to tell people that if only they choose the right choice then they will succeed...[/quote]
Perhaps I could have been more clear in my phrasing, but I wasn't claiming that at all. As I said, my statement only applies to "[i]affluent, college educated[/i]" people.

The same restrictions don't apply to us, as apply to the general population. Of the people I know with a similar background, those who aren't employed are the ones who failed to make any effort to address employability. If you applied to internships, took on academic research, published papers, etc. then you seem to have a pretty good chance of employment, [b]even[/b] as an English major.
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[quote name='swiftcoder' timestamp='1348751299' post='4984334']
The majority of computer science is [b]not [/b]about 'math and codes'.
[/quote]
Noam Chomsky was of another time. Also I did take a BA in Chinese(hence linguistic) and now doing a CS degree and do find that grammar analysis and algorithm analysis can be similar but still it is really not the same. Perhaps the focus from nation to nation or University to university is different. At our department it is mandatory to take several classes(in fact half the program) which math majors are taking. In fact our whole nation put CS department together with the Mat department. Even simple classes such as database management deals with theoretical logic from the school of logic. Saying that the majority of CS is NOT about mat and codes is really wrong. CS is a major dealing with the management of information and that is done by using the mathematics to instruct a machine to do this through codes or math(depending on the abstraction level you work and what you work with).

How would you make AND, NAND, OR or XOR gates do anything without the MAT to trig this or at least test and prove that it works?

How would you make good cryptology software without the extended Euclidean algorithm(which is by the way built on math theory).

Computer Science IS about Math(including the logic from Boolean etc.) and codes as that is what you use in order to make the stuff happen on the screen. All the API we use is also math down on hardware level. How about hash tables? How about Boolean logic when making databases? How about... etc. etc.

Even when making games or 3D technology it is all math and logic(linear algebra). 3D technology is also used in drones, surveillance and other technologies that CS department do research within and there that math is a VERY import tool.

To be honestly with you everything we touch is more or less related to or is strongly connected to Math. A Computer Scientist would be very sad without Math.

Ahhh another long post. Sorry.. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img]
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