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Misa

C++ and OpenGL

13 posts in this topic

Hi,

I would like to start programming games,
I've been reading gamedev forums for a few days now and I have a few questions.

Is starting right from the beginning with an engine is the proper way ?
Do you have some books (or sites) to recommend about C++ and/or OpenGL for game programming ?
(any other book that might be useful to beginners are welcome too)

I'm looking to create something with C++ and OpenGL (due to it's portability).
I already have some programming skills with C/C++ and Java, I did desktop application programming and a bit of Minecraft modding but i don't have any game-specific programming skills.

I am looking to do some basic 2D RTS game (loading a map, handling units, moving, attack), I know that for the moment i don't have enough skills to start such a project and i'm aware of the amount of work it requires so I hope you'll enlighten me to get starting [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

thank you.
[size=1](I hope my english was understandable)[/size] Edited by Misa
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If you want to really make a game, start with an existing engine. If your goal is to play with OpenGL and C++ and probably never ship a real game (unless it's a really simple one), then go that way. That's my advice.
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thank you Faelenor,
I don't plan to release a commercial game, it's for my own purpose.
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Not even just a commercial game... but finishing any type of game at all. I strongly recommend using an existing engine to people when they are more interested in the game design and focusing on the gameplay, because the majority of people that decide to start from scratch never even come close to having something that resembles a working game.
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If you want to make games, starting with C++ and OpenGL is possibly the worst combination. It's akin to wanting to learn to fly starting out with a bunch of scrap metal and a four stroke engine. I'm not familiar with RTS engines so cannot recommend any (although a google search yields results) but regardless, if you want to go down the programming route you can sack off any ideas of starting with an RTS and and instead start off with something very simple like tic-tac-toe or a text-based hangman game. Keep it simple, keep it realistic. Even using an engine would be jumping the gun at this stage. Edited by GeneralQuery
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[quote name='GeneralQuery' timestamp='1348690961' post='4984095']Even using an engine would be jumping the gun at this stage.[/quote]

I don't agree with this. Using an engine, you can concentrate yourself on the actual gameplay instead of boilerplate code, low level APIs and stuff like that.
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[quote name='Faelenor' timestamp='1348691521' post='4984098']
[quote name='GeneralQuery' timestamp='1348690961' post='4984095']Even using an engine would be jumping the gun at this stage.[/quote]

I don't agree with this. Using an engine, you can concentrate yourself on the actual gameplay instead of boilerplate code, low level APIs and stuff like that.
[/quote]
My point is that starting with no programming experience, an engine is certainly not a good place to start. Learn to program first, it's not like there's any Unity-style WYSIWYG engines for RTSs that I'm aware of.
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Well, I don't know what you've read, but if your concern is portability, you're making the wrong choice ;) But, OpenGL is still good, so -- The project you're trying to accomplish, Hard - Coded, Is not really feasible for someone who doesn't even know the whole language! You should do these things in this order (Or don't do them in this order, you can experiment ;)
1. Solidify your knowledge of C++ -- Learn the language First! If you don't know the actual language well, coding a game is almost impossible!
2. Try to make some games like tic tac toe, checkers, etc. in the console and try coding some object oriented simulations.
3. Learn a 2d library like SFML or SDL (I recommend and constantly use SFML, but it's your choice).
4. Make some 2d games. Start with pong or breakout, and move on to things like Tetris with advanced collision detection and physics.
5. Try OpenGl (But I warn you, it'll take a month to make a box, and you should probably go with some prebuilt engines at first.)
6. Continue on the path of game development! Edited by superman3275
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Just use Unity3D. You can achieve quite alot with it by just knowing some basic programming, it's really quick results and highly portable (android, iOs, windows, mac, etc)

Of course you can make any kind of game, such as an RTS, with it.
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Ok, thank you for your answers.

superman3272:
I know OpenGL isn't easy, i saw some basic examples (like boxes) and i didn't understood anything :D so I guess I should start with an engine based on top of it.
about the portability, is the choosen langage a problem ? i thought if libraries where multiplatform it would be enough. Am I wrong?
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[quote name='GeneralQuery' timestamp='1348691767' post='4984100']
it's not like there's any Unity-style WYSIWYG engines for RTSs that I'm aware of.
[/quote]
I built a fully featured RTS prototype in pre-production using Unity and it took a little over a week, so I don't see why you would need something more specialized.
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[quote name='Saruman' timestamp='1348787340' post='4984527']
[quote name='GeneralQuery' timestamp='1348691767' post='4984100']
it's not like there's any Unity-style WYSIWYG engines for RTSs that I'm aware of.
[/quote]
I built a fully featured RTS prototype in pre-production using Unity and it took a little over a week, so I don't see why you would need something more specialized.
[/quote]
Then he's in luck. WYSIWYG engines are perfect for beginners, API-style engines... not so.
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[quote name='GeneralQuery' timestamp='1348787498' post='4984529']
WYSIWYG engines are perfect for beginners, API-style engines... not so.
[/quote]
I'm wondering what the difference is as I've never heard these distinctions? I've worked with many different commercial engines professionally and they basically consist of a WYSIWYG level design tool (along with various other asset tools/conditioners) and then a scripting language (or some type of visual scripting tool like Kismet or C4 incorporates) and sometimes customizations in C++ either as a plugin or core to the build. The vast majority of games are built using a technology like this.

Mind you I'm not arguing or saying there isn't such a distinction, it's just that I've never heard of it. Edited by Saruman
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