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Game creation software

14 posts in this topic

Hello all! Its been long since i wrote the last post in this forum ^_^. I was going to put this topic in the APIs forum, but as i saw this is more activeforum.

Right now im making games in flash, and learning Away3d. The problem is that i want something more "complex"

As i may have said, there is [url="http://drakensang.com"]game[/url] i really like. I want to make something similar but im a little bit confused. This specific game i mentioned, uses maya for the models. Ok till here. After that i know it uses, java, nebula3 and ms visual studio. I have no idea how they combined all of these. lets say i dont care, but i still want to make somethig like this. Its simple with very beautiful graphics and animations. What software can i use, and what knowledge do i need to know? Does it need different programms for the menu, for the 3d models import, the animations, the data transport etc?
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blender for 3d modelling a nd animations and many other stuff (FREE), as far as im concernced you had to pay for Maya.

Unity 3d has good graphics and also has the FBX importer which means that you can model in blender and then import it into unity.
Furthermore, maya also has the FBX importer so you can, after youve finished import it into maya.
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Can i import from Maya to Unity3D? Does Unity3D supports the technologies for a game like that? I have no experiance with game engines, so i need one that is kinda easy to learn
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[quote name='heiro' timestamp='1348912388' post='4984990']
Its simple with very beautiful graphics and animations.
[/quote]
Just for the record it is not a "simple" game in the least as it is a browser based action MMO and was built with a full team that had been working together for years on other projects. I would actually classify this type of game as one of the hardest to build and Nebula 3 was built to support games like this from the ground up.

Regarding your questions:

1. Yes you can import models built in Maya.
2. You could definitely use Unity to build a game like this but you are still going to have a massive amount of programming work and will also need to either build or buy a base server solution such as Photon
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[QUOTE]The problem is that i want something more "complex"[/QUOTE]

Java is your starting haven for suitable web applet game creation: --> [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_(programming_language"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_(programming_language[/url])

Java applets can be directly integrated on web pages, and it's more powerful and complex than Flash.

Also, I checked out that game you want to make ... keep in mind that it's not an "easy" task to accomplish a game like that.

In reality, many programmers will struggle to get ping pong game logic and flow to be accurate, because even the most simple games require time and strategy.

The game you want to make is a bit farfetched from just being a Flash programmer. You should start smaller, and work your way up.

My advice: learn Java, use its API (or any graphics API/library it can bind with) and practice executable programs first, and try to accomplish more easier games (like some with direct raster graphics in memory, not 3-D models, complex animations, AI, etc.).

You are setting yourself up for a big goal before completing several smaller ones.
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If you're only experienced in Flash (e.g. no other programming languages, syntax, etc.) you shouldn't worry too much about APIs and libraries so fast.

First, learn Java 100%(okay, maybe not 100%, but learn it well). Practice on an IDE program called Eclipse: [url="http://www.eclipse.org/"]http://www.eclipse.org/[/url]

After you get more familiar with Java, look into Java Swing - it provides a graphical window with utilities, buttons, elements, etc:

[url="http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/start/index.html"]http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/start/index.html[/url]

After you get the hang of that pretty well, and after you get more Java-specific experience(try in just the OSes console window, terminal, etc. and practice with text-based windows for a while), then it's time to move to the more serious stuff.

Remember, you have to start smaller before you advance into more complicated tasks. Within months you can already be writing games easily.

A beginner to science doesn't just jump straight into string theory.
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Why java? Java is an interpreter that is bad because instead of directly being able to directly run your program it has to first in real time convert your code into machine code then run it that means slow down. Also java has no support for unsigned numbers this is bad. I can not go with out unsigned number. I needed them my programs would use a lot more ram if I could only used signed numbers. I would recommend C I write and C and my programs are fast.
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[quote name='sega16' timestamp='1349137350' post='4985918']
Why java? Java is an interpreter that is bad because instead of directly being able to directly run your program it has to first in real time convert your code into machine code then run it that means slow down. Also java has no support for unsigned numbers this is bad. I can not go with out unsigned number. I needed them my programs would use a lot more ram if I could only used signed numbers. I would recommend C I write and C and my programs are fast.
[/quote]
You know, you're going to read this post again in a few years and really laugh at this. :)
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[quote name='sega16' timestamp='1349137350' post='4985918']
Why java? Java is an interpreter that is bad because instead of directly being able to directly run your program it has to first in real time convert your code into machine code then run it that means slow down. Also java has no support for unsigned numbers this is bad. I can not go with out unsigned number. I needed them my programs would use a lot more ram if I could only used signed numbers. I would recommend C I write and C and my programs are fast.
[/quote]

Mine craft is writen in Java and it doesn't have these "performance" issues you're alluding to...and its a significantly large game.

The difference between signed and unsigned numbers is whether or not the last bit is used to represent a sign bit or a number value.
unsigned int range: 0 -> 4294967296
signed int range: -2147483648 -> 2147483648 (Note: 2147483648 - -2147483648 = 4294967296)
So, a signed int or unsigned int uses the same amount of memory: 32 bits!!! Using unsigned ints doesn't use less memory, it just changes the range of min and max values.

Java is actually a good language to use because it's trivial to port to other platforms and it has some of the most robust networking capabilities. If you're good with it and comfortable with it, it's a very good language to know! If you're concerned with performance problems, the first thing you should do is look at your algorithm design rather than blaming it on the JVM. Example: bubble sorting 1000 items will be slow whether you use C/C++ or Java because its a O(n^2) algorithm and not O(log n) like quick sort.
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Yes that is true that a signed number takes the same amount of ram but what if you need to store a lot of numbers that have range of 0-255 in java you would have to use a short array but in c you could use a unsigned char array would takes half the amount of ram. Also I looked up what is minecraft and the graphics were not that good. They even had to resort to use nearest neighbor scaling on all the textures. That explains why it runs fast due to simple graphics.
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Yeah, C is great and all. I like C, and reading K&R [i]The C Programming Language[/i] can be a breath of fresh air sometimes. But it's not the one true way. There is no one true way in engineering. And when you're not really engineering, when you're just playing, then there is absolutely no one true way.

But if you're stricken with OCD, or perhaps you're developing for a system that requires such attention to detail, and you must concern yourself with excess bits and bytes, you're welcome to do that, too. Edited by Heath
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I know C++ and PHP so i dont have problems with the programing part. I have worked with the utilites you refer (not in java) and i have made terminal apps. I started Unity 3d with [url="http://www.amazon.com/Unity-3-x-Game-Development-Essentials/dp/1849691444/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1349369391&sr=1-1&keywords=unity+3d"]this[/url] book and its prety awesome! Also about the networking stuff i found out about [url="http://www.exitgames.com/"]photon[/url]. I think i will go on with these for now, i almost reached the half of the book!
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[quote name='Heath' timestamp='1349323035' post='4986644']
or perhaps you're developing for a system that requires such attention to detail, and you must concern yourself with excess bits and bytes, you're welcome to do that, too.
[/quote]
There you have nailed it my hoby is to program for very limited micro controllers I enjoy making limited hardware doing impressive things sometimes I even program in assembly but I use c alot too.
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[quote name='sega16' timestamp='1349392108' post='4986942']
[quote name='Heath' timestamp='1349323035' post='4986644']
or perhaps you're developing for a system that requires such attention to detail, and you must concern yourself with excess bits and bytes, you're welcome to do that, too.
[/quote]
There you have nailed it my hoby is to program for very limited micro controllers I enjoy making limited hardware doing impressive things sometimes I even program in assembly but I use c alot too.
[/quote]I like that hobby. :) I keep the C64 programming manuals as PDFs in my Ubuntu One cloud, and I've fiddled a little with NES programming. It takes a whole different mindset from current PC programming.
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