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BentmGamer

Styles

6 posts in this topic

Hello, im an amatuer 2d artist with limited softa\ware, no graphic tablet or scanner, and a pentium 4 w/ 2g ram. I have been recently expeiremnting with 2d art styles, cuz like i said, pentium 4. And I decided to be original and create a half new style. How do u like it? Any suggestions or tutorials?

and if the link is broken...

[attachment=11523:testscenegd.jpg]
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To me, it looks like a kid's TV show background, like Blues Clues are something. Kind of a bizarre mix of cartoony shapes and textures ripped from photos. I think going more for the cartoony direction would make more sense, or at least be more aesthetically pleasing.

Honestly, I think you should try studying existing artwork to get a better idea of the basics before going much further, and practice drawing with pencil and paper. Bad habits are hard to break the longer you have them...

I'm trying to find a decent compendium of online tutorials, but I think if you're really interested in drawing, you should pick up a book on the subject (used preferably, since the basics don't really change). A book would be nice since you can be sure it'd start from the basics and have a more unified idea of what you should learn first, rather than having to jump around online trying to learn from different authors with different styles. I have a pretty good one but I'm not at my apartment right now and can't remember the title (I'll have to get back to you).

Keep at it!
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[quote name='Prinz Eugn' timestamp='1349026371' post='4985415']
I'm trying to find a decent compendium of online tutorials, but I think if you're really interested in drawing, you should pick up a book on the subject
[/quote] , I am intersted in drawing, but as I said, limits. Plus I have no scanner graphics tablet, of camera, Im trying my best, and I've actually been working at that style to try make it better
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Style is secondary to basics. It does not matter if you do not have a scanner, these are studies that you probably won't be sharing. Look at some tutorials, and pick up some books on the basics of everything from the figure (Andrew Loomis is good, and free online!), to the basics of perspective and composition, to color theory, then grab your pen and paper and get going!

Because, unfortunately, style doesn't cover up errors in the foundations; cracks always show up. Good luck!
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If hardware is your limit I would think about pixel art. Then you need to practise, practise, and eventually practise.
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Hi Bentm,

This might sound rude, but I'm trying to help.

That example of your art is very childish looking and absolutely doesn't show you in a positive light. Those that are looking for an artist may see this and dismiss you completely, even later on after developing your skills and having better work because they remember this first piece.

You might want to reconsider asking for work while you are still very amateur. Taking time to practice, study, and nurture your skills will get you to a place that people will want to work with you. (Saying this because I saw your "2D Artist Looking for Project" post, which should be in classifieds)

All I'm saying is don't get ahead of yourself. You should put in the practice, compare your work with others, and don't delude yourself. There will always be a better artist than yourself just as there will be a better artist than them.

Like BagelHero said, you need to work on your fundamentals. It shows through in your art.

So, that's my 2 cents on your art work.

I hope you take what I've said into consideration.

[color=#d3d3d3](Edited Format)[/color] Edited by DaveTroyer
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[quote name='BagelHero' timestamp='1349054234' post='4985593']
Style is secondary to basics. It does not matter if you do not have a scanner, these are studies that you probably won't be sharing
[/quote] The reason I noted that i have no scanner is cuz im actually a pretty talented character/item artist, but have been able to publish digitally for the reason of using fireworks, having nos canner or graphics tablet. And yes, looking back at this drawing now I do realize I didnt perfect it and it looks like I rushed ALOT
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