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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Stupificationism

Coding

8 posts in this topic

Heyo, (hopefully I posted this in the right place) I'm new to game code or game engines. I've been more of an html sort of person but there comes a point in every young adventurer's life when web design becomes a tad boring.
A lot boring.
A great deal boring. [I'm sure you get the point]
So, I've been coming up with a pen and paper rpg for a while now but a friend of mine got me onto the idea of developing it into a (no doubt rubbish) game. So I did a bit of research and flexed the ol' google muscle and came up with Unity as my best bet for a potential game engine.
I know the cons are quite a few for the free version (and no way in hell am I buying the pro version) so I wanted to know if Unity is a good choice or if I should be looking into different code/engine options.
Thanks.

[Sorry if I posted this in the wrong place by the way]
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Welcome to coding I suppose! :P
Unity I would say would be a good starter point. Also check out http://www.yoyogames.com/gamemaker/studio < The free version to get an idea how you want to make your game. I feel like gamemaker is more for .. prototyping? So that's an option as well. :P But yeah try Unity out and see if you like it. If so, get into it and start making a simple game and work your way up. Can't make a FF or Chrono Trigger till you've made a few old school point and click basic as hell RPG's. :P
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There are several options for different purposes. If you want to make a simple game, classic turn battle rpg, like old school final fantasy, you'll always have the trusty Rpg Maker. Other small engines like Game Maker, etc. Unity is a great engine, and a great deal of work is put in it. But if you are just starting, its better to start with text based games, and move on slowly, to avoid bitting more than you can chew, since finishing a game is a very important part of creating games.
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Thanks for the reply guys [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
I see your points, can't run before you walk (and you can't walk if you've had one too many)
I think I'll go with your advice and try out something a bit my speed first like Pong.
Thanks again [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] Edited by Stupificationism
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Depending on how much time you have, learning a language can be really beneficial to you. Programming is more of a mindset then it is specific code -- Lots of great games have terrible code (Though never strive for this, obviously :P ) Knowing one would be beneficial to you, even with engines like Unity.

So if you've got a bit of time to learn, just dedicate yourself to coding. Its like an instrument, and has to be practiced like one. Just crank it out and you'll be amazed at how much you get done in little time. If you don't have a bunch of time, learning a smaller engine that doesn't require much or any code is probably preferable. You could always try and do both.
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Well. Torque3D went recently open source: https://www.garagegames.com/products/torque-3d/overview

Sources: https://github.com/GarageGames/Torque3D

I understand its on the same league as Unity.
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Do you have any "special requirements" other than it being a game engine? For example, what platform(s) would you like to develop for?

I personally don't like Unity (find it somewhat non-intuitive to work with). However, it does support deploying to multiple platforms with no or minor fuzz. If you're valuing cross-platform deployment greatly then it is probably one of the best choices out there.
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I've started making some game development tutorials on youtube, You don't need any coding experience because it teaches you java. I've only just started but I'm uploading two tutorials a day. I'm trying to keep the tutorials simple enough to help people who know little about programming.
www.youtube.com/gendev2012
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