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What do the SCALING and SCANLINE_ORDER parts of the DXGI_SWAP_CHAIN_DESC / DXGI_MODE_DESC do?

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Pretty simple question. While I was enumming my DXGI adapters and outputs, I found that a lot of display modes were repeated. On this graphics card/monitor combi, 1280x720 @ 60 Hz comes up a whopping 3 times. The different display modes seem to have different ScanlineOrder and Scaling members, but can anybody explain what these actually mean? MSDN is less informative than my goldfish, which died 2 years ago

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Scanline ordering specifies if the output is [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_scan"]interlaced or progressive[/url], and if interlaced, whether even or odd lines begin each frame. Progressive provides best image quality, but not all display devices can support it at (especially) high resolutions, because it takes twice the bandwidth of interlaced over same time period.

Scaling specifies whether the output image is scaled to the full display area or centered to match 1:1 with the physical pixels, if the source image is of different size than the destination video mode. If centering is used, the pixels falling outside the image are filled with black, resulting in "letterboxing".

Sorry about your goldfish. Edited by Nik02

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