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rockstar8577

Mobile or PC

20 posts in this topic

In your opinion which do you think would be easier to start with and make a name for myself kind of? Mobile or PC? I have about 2 - 3 years programming experience from my classes. I have done some small apps for myself and have done a prototype game or two on pc. Nothing really big or major, but do you think think it would be better to try and make games for PC or try and do them for a mobile platform.

Also mobile for me is Android. Some insight would be very appreciative! :)
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As we see it: it's easier to make games for mobile platforms, but it's really difficult to make a name for yourself by making mobile games. Ask yourself: how many people do you know that make mobile games (for Android) and how many for pc?
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Well i really love making games, i at least think about them a lot. Different ideas, different things to do for them, and i also really enjoy programming. Programming is really enjoyable to me. I liked programming them, the fun of just accomplishing something was amazing. Maybe i kind of stated it wrong, but i know i most likely won't get fortune. That's not really my aim, it would be nice though. I meant which would be easier to reach people with. It seems like i could access more people easier with mobile, but pc has a more vast library for games.

[quote name='Goran Milovanovic' timestamp='1349339818' post='4986688']
For such people (who really love the process), the platform is completely irrelevant. They have a project that they're working on, and they're trying their best to craft a game worth playing.
[/quote]

For that i would probably have to disagree, because if you are making a game you would plan on making it for the designated platform and build it around that platform. Since platforms do make a difference, it will effect the building process. At least i believe it would.
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[quote name='frob' timestamp='1349372358' post='4986822']
One decided to go into landscaping and floral design, another into music education, another into industrial design.
[/quote]

So, 2/3rds of them are broke, eh? ;)

Coincidentally, I dated a girl that did flower arrangements for weddings and let me just say... I was a senior developer at the time and her earnings absolutely shamed mine! You don't even want to guess at the costs of flowers at weddings! Edited by Serapth
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Would not the developing and releasing of mobile and pc games be different? If you want to look at it from a distance for the designing, yea they will be the same. Though for the input of touch and the input of a keyboard wouldn't that effect the game? How it's played, how it would work, how the input is processed?
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Of course, details of the actual code that is developed are different, but the process of developing a game involves much more than the code that deals with input devices or drawing graphics.

"i can assure you [b]the overall process [/b]is the same across the board."
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[quote name='rockstar8577' timestamp='1349383481' post='4986890']
Would not the developing and releasing of mobile and pc games be different? If you want to look at it from a distance for the designing, yea they will be the same. Though for the input of touch and the input of a keyboard wouldn't that effect the game? How it's played, how it would work, how the input is processed?
[/quote]
How, exactly, will it make a difference?

Both devices have touch-and-pick interfaces. One is a mouse, one is a finger. It is slightly easier to design for gestures, but you should not depend on them, so they are roughly equal.

Both devices have keyboards; one is attached to a PC, the other is possibly attached (many phones and tablets have attached keyabords or bluetooth keyboards) or it may be a software keyboard overlay. Either way, if you need a keyboard they are present.

That is a minor design difference, not a major one.
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Idk maybe it's just me, but it just seems like platform would matter.

Edit: Well i think PC overall would be a better choice. Edited by rockstar8577
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It is probably easier to learn on PC than it is on the resource constrained platform known as a smartphone.
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I'd say, the platform that you like most!

Think it this way, if you made a game, you'd want to play it on your mobile device on in your PC? Maybe you'd want both! So pick the one you like most and start there.

"Fame & Fortune Inc." its 95% luck and 5% talent (and 98% of internet statistics are made up :P ) Not all talented people get to be famous, and not all famous people are talented.

For example, there are a lot of people in the world who could have been Markus "Notch" Persson, some would have been a better Notch, some would have been a worse Notch, but the fact that Notch is Notch and Minecraft got to be what it is, its pure coincidence.

Just do what you like most and what you think its cool to do, the rest will unravel itself.
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A lot of indy or low end stuff I see being made would seem so much better as Android or IOS software instead of being PC software. I just saw someone post a very nice looking project in one of the sub forums here and was thinking "I'd pay a few dollars for this on my tablet, but I won't even try the PC demo". Same goes for the game Cardinal Quest. I paid for it on my tablet, instead of playing it for free on my PC.
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That's what i'm saying. Some stuff would totally be better for certain platforms hence why you shouldn't just design it for a platform chosen at random.
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[quote name='Daaark' timestamp='1349746402' post='4988178']
A lot of indy or low end stuff I see being made would seem so much better as Android or IOS software instead of being PC software. I just saw someone post a very nice looking project in one of the sub forums here and was thinking "I'd pay a few dollars for this on my tablet, but I won't even try the PC demo". Same goes for the game Cardinal Quest. I paid for it on my tablet, instead of playing it for free on my PC.
[/quote]

Right, but it started out as a free to play PC game, so it seems pretty clear that profit was a secondary motivation.

The developer didn't start out with some silly aspiration to be a game dev "rockstar", and make the highest profits by developing for some specific platform.

If profit is your primary motivation, the platform is still largely irrelevant, because you'll probably never finish the game in the first place.
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I never said profit was my primary motivation. I don't know where you got that idea [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/mellow.png[/img].

Also i hope you aren't implicating my name in anyway, as my name has nothing to do with me wanting to be a programmer. And last why would you knock someone who wants to be a game dev? Edited by rockstar8577
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[quote name='rockstar8577' timestamp='1349802909' post='4988412']
Also i hope you aren't implicating my name in anyway, as my name has nothing to do with me wanting to be a programmer.
[/quote]

[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/rolleyes.gif[/img]
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[quote name='Goran Milovanovic' timestamp='1349903071' post='4988858']
[quote name='rockstar8577' timestamp='1349802909' post='4988412']
Also i hope you aren't implicating my name in anyway, as my name has nothing to do with me wanting to be a programmer.
[/quote]

[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/rolleyes.gif[/img]
[/quote]
[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/dry.png[/img]
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[quote name='rockstar8577' timestamp='1349315335' post='4986625']
NaN Like Posted 03 October 2012 - 09:48 PM
In your opinion which do you think would be easier to start with and make a name for myself kind of? Mobile or PC?
[/quote]

Hi,

1) Easier depends on whether you want to make a "name" for yourself as a hobbyist or a professional.
2) PC games bring in by far the most gross sales per AAA popular game and a guaranteed win for professional fame. On the other hand, you could get 15 minutes of fame as a hobby game developer in Mobile if your game goes "viral". Good luck making a lot of money in mobile, though it is possible.

Clinton Edited by 3Ddreamer
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[quote name='Goran Milovanovic' timestamp='1349799353' post='4988397']
Right, but it started out as a free to play PC game, so it seems pretty clear that profit was a secondary motivation.[/quote] I'm not speaking about profit motivation.

Different platforms have different types of software that is suited to them. That's why the DS has a huge library of titles that you will never see on other machines, and when games get ported to the DS, they tend to get redesigned to fit more with the handheld culture.

I'm not sitting down at my desk and booting up my PC to play [url="http://www.kongregate.com/games/idoyehi/cardinal-quest"]Cardinal Quest[/url] or any games like it. I'm not too fond of squinting to see a tiny black playfield hosted on a web page with a bright background. Despite how great I think it is, it's just not something I'm going to bother with as PC Software. Turn it into mobile software, and suddenly it's very different. I love it, and play it all the time. I'm anxiously awaiting the sequel!

I see tons of good software being made, and it sits unnoticed on the indy game programmer forums. They also bitch that can't program for any consoles because they are locked down, etc... meanwhile, Android v2+ is the world's most popular console like device, and the only barrier is a 1 time 25$ fee. And people making software of similar styles and quality are making money and getting exposure off them.
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