• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Inferiarum

Programming games

8 posts in this topic

Are there any larger scale games that include the possibility to program behavior of in-game objects?
What I mean is something like http://robocode.sourceforge.net/ but with a more complex strategic gameplay.

If there is not, do you guys think there could be an audience for something like that. What I have in mind is a RTS game where it is optional to modify behavior of units.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is a list of some games that use programming as the core gameplay.

http://programminggames.org/

Personally if it is well written and uses good concepts then yes, but an RTS game I'm a little skeptical if that could be used, but you never know!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Inferiarum' timestamp='1349444751' post='4987112']
If there is not, do you guys think there could be an audience for something like that.[/quote]
A very niche audience, perhaps. We had trouble generating any interest in this sort of game, even within a university CS department.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am developing a browser-based online RPG where the characters are 'always online' and can be scripted to perform tasks while the player is offline. Edited by JoshNet83
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Inferiarum' timestamp='1349444751' post='4987112']
Are there any larger scale games that include the possibility to program behavior of in-game objects?
What I mean is something like [url="http://robocode.sourceforge.net/"]http://robocode.sourceforge.net/[/url] but with a more complex strategic gameplay.

If there is not, do you guys think there could be an audience for something like that. What I have in mind is a RTS game where it is optional to modify behavior of units.
[/quote]

I can't imagine a case where one has the time to [i]program[/i] behavior for units, at least in multiplayer. Depends on how you define RTS I suppose. I know there are some RTS games that allow limited control of unit behavior with things like toggles and what not.

Could you be more specific as to the capabilities you are looking at?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you hide the actual programming stuff like zachtronics has in space chem: http://www.spacechemthegame.com/ and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oPpEfKxCBM. Even optimization score boards. To be honest this is probably one of my favorite programming games just because of how well it hides the fact that it is one.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was not thinking of a classical RTS like starcraft but rather something more tactical. Actually it would be probably closer to an RPG than an RTS game. Maybe the last sentence in the original post was a bit misleading.

So you are controlling a guy which is some kind of hacker and you can build/upgrade robots which follow you (or not, depending on how you program them :). You find resources to upgrade/specialize the robots etc. There could be both single player missions and multiplayer skirmishes. Of course you would not code during the match but have a set of programs you can plug into the robots.

To make it more accessible I had the idea to allow ingame trading of code (closed source) between players and maybe add ingame repositories for open source projects.

Well I guess I should start working on the game and get a prototype going.

One thing i was wondering is, if it is a better idea to implement my own very simple scripting language, (I was thinking of something like glsl, where you have access to some predefined variables, but only allowing a main function) or just go with something like lua (which i have never used).
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
While not exactly what you're looking for, Final Fantasy XII, and the Dragon Age series both have similar systems that allow you to script your party members' behavior when in combat. I'd say those are beyond niche titles.

The interface is pretty simple (and is pretty much identical for both games), where you essentially build a big "if, else if, else if, else if..." block using pre-defined conditions and actions. This makes it more accessible than having to code the behavior, but limits what the end user can do.

The final fantasy system was dubbed the "Gambit system" if you wanted to look it up. The Dragon Age system wasn't named but there weren't many differences between the two.

Perhaps a similar system with the ability to script your own conditions might make it accessible enough, but interesting enough for programmers to poke around.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Inferiarum' timestamp='1349444751' post='4987112']
Are there any larger scale games that include the possibility to program behavior of in-game objects?[/quote]As a part of the gameplay? I don't know. But I want to point out (just in case you don't know) most commercial "engines" nowadays are based on that concept, although they typically don't allow to do that from the game itself.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0