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CosmicDashie

trying to figure out what to do

15 posts in this topic

Alright, i am a high school student in my final year. Simply put, my goal is to pursue a career in the video game industry.

My knowledge of this is very limited as one would imagine, but i am trying to get into game design/programming

I am posting here because i would like to know the best route to go in order to achieve this, essentially what i should learn.

I am very sorry if i have worded this in a confusing way but i hope i can get some advice/info or anything really on game design/programming
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Which are you wanting to go into? Game design or programming or both?

If programming, [url="http://www.python.org/"]Python[/url] is an excellent language to start with.

If game design... 'game design' is an overused term with a poorly defined meaning, that is rather all encompassing.
So to get a better idea of what you are actually interested in, explain what you want to do, [i]without[/i] using the word 'develop', 'design', 'game' or 'create'.

Are you wanting to write the stories? Write the character backgrounds? Draw art? Balance gameplay mechanics? Layout and engineer levels/maps/areas? Define background lore? Do 3D modelling? Plan player quests? Script events? Calculate probabilities and chance?

What part of making games are actually the parts that interest you?
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Really what interests me about this area is programming, i would really be interested in going into programming, i guess game design is a bad term to use. But i really do not even know where to start, or how i will persue it after high school

Mostly on the mechanical side (making the game mechanics function properly, putting everything together etc)
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You might want to look at getting a formal education after high school, if you have the opportunity. In the meantime, experiment! Check around for online resources and learn some programming or scripting along the way. As Servant of the Lord brought up, Python is a good choice, and C# or Java are possibilities as well.

And don't neglect your math courses. If you really want to get into programming, you'll regret not paying attention at some point. In some places, colleges may require a higher level for a programming course than your high school let you leave with.

Tom Sloper's [url="http://www.sloperama.com/advice.html"]excellent FAQ[/url] has a lot of good information in it, about the nature of the business and game design. Edited by Haps
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Game design: I have lots of ideas. I make up game rules, cut out cardboard figures, and come up with creative adventures.
Game programming: printf("Hello, World!");

If you want to become a programmer, the best thing you can do is pick up some introductory programming books and start learning.

Game programming is just programming.

Start with your simple "Hello, World!" program, learn how to write bigger and bigger programs, eventually you can write your own 'Tic Tac Toe' game or text adventure. Several years of work later you'll be able to build nice-looking 3D games, with the help of animators and artists and other team members.
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This all helped a great deal, i believe i will start learning c# and python

thank you guys for the help [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

on the languages note, are there any recommended books to pick up for c#/python? Edited by CosmicDashie
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I haven't read his [url="http://starboundsoftware.com/books/c-sharp/"]book[/url] firsthand, but I have referred people to [url="http://rbwhitaker.wikidot.com/c-sharp-tutorials"]RB Whitaker's C# tutorials[/url] before and it expands on them. You can try the site and see if it works for you.
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After you've been working on becoming a good programmer for a while, you'll find that companies will state that experience within the game industry and/or a B.S. degree are required to be eligible for a programming position.

The best way to get experience is to collaborate with a mod team. You could possibly get an internship with a smaller game company for experience but volunteering for a mod team on a game you're interested in will not only give you experience, but also give you something to show off in a portfolio. It's extremely important that you have something to demonstrate to companies showing that you not only can deliver on what you say you can do, but that you have the passion and grit to follow through on projects not for the money, but for the love of it.

Of course, this is all after you are comfortable with the language(s) you choose to develop in and are comfortable with programming concepts in general.

Having a portfolio, even as a programmer, I feel is essential. Be sure to [i]finish your projects[/i] and only show off what you consider to be your best work.

One of the greatest resources you have at your disposal (other than google) is your peers. Don't hesitate to ask questions of others especially here on gamedev when you encounter a difficult problem.

Lastly, be consistent. Try to at least program something, no matter how small it is, each day. You will be surprised how much more you learn in a shorter amount of time if you practice and experiment every day rather than every other day. On experimentation, don't ever be afraid to try out an idea because it might be a mistake and break your code. Breaking your code is a good thing. Look into how the code broke, why it broke, and how to fix it. You [i]will[/i] run into bugs throughout your programming adventures; every programmer does. Being able to identify and fix your bugs quickly will be an indispensable skill for you to have.

Good luck, take your time, and have fun with the process :)
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Have you taken Computer Science?(if your high school offers)
If you have, you should be fine in any languages
Even if you haven't, you should still be fine.

I really recommend getting a book rather than looking at some internet tutorials.
A book explains stuff in detail and usually offers good programming exercises so you can use what you learned in making your programs. Edited by lride
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Sorry to reply here , but my concern is to start my own thread in the forum and i dint find any link in the forum to write a new fresh thread so i am asking here , i am completely new to the website and just registered with facebook account. Please help !!
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[quote name='CosmicDashie' timestamp='1349467038' post='4987230']
I am posting here because i would like to know the best route to go in order to achieve this, essentially what i should learn.
[/quote]

Hi,

Only [i]you[/i] may determine which is the best route to go for you. There are many ways to climb a mountain, paint on canvas, and make games.

That being said, take a few days of reading around this forum, website, and others. Get a feeling of what general type of game you want to make long term. Choose a system - there are many - which is friendly to beginners for you to start. It should have a very active supportive community.

Pick only a language which is more friendly than C++ for a beginner, such as C#, Python, C, Java, or other good one for newbies, though these are all used by advanced programmers, too. One good strategy for choosing a language is to select the system first and use the language which that community uses with the system, such as a game engine for computer games or a Software Development Kit (SDK) for browser games, just as examples. Start learning your language very soon!

Now, this website has much information for new people, especially in this forum, so read many of the threads in recent weeks on these pages. I say this because your questions are posted by new people almost every day here and got many helpful answers in each of those threads. In the last week, there have been fantastic ones!

Stay with it, learn a lot, work hard, and have fun![img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

Clinton Edited by 3Ddreamer
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[quote name='trilinesoft' timestamp='1349522155' post='4987359']
Sorry to reply here , but my concern is to start my own thread in the forum and i dint find any link in the forum to write a new fresh thread so i am asking here , i am completely new to the website and just registered with facebook account. Please help !!
[/quote]

[url="http://www.gamedev.net/index.php?app=forums&module=post&section=post&do=new_post&f=31"]Click here to start a new thread[/url] - In your new thread, you should be specific in what you are asking help for, to receive the best results. "Please help" doesn't let anyone know what you are wanting help [i]with[/i].
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[quote name='CosmicDashie' timestamp='1349471248' post='4987253']
This all helped a great deal, i believe i will start learning c# and python

thank you guys for the help [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

on the languages note, are there any recommended books to pick up for c#/python?
[/quote]
For a grounding in C# the Deitel series is not bad. Although it may be like drinking water out of fire hose for a beginner. I would look at some online tutorials first. Once you know what you are looking for then maybe spend $50 on a book.

If you do choose c# as a first language and master some of the basics (and still want to pursue gamedev) I would recommend Learning XNA 4.0 by Aaron Reed (O'Rielly Series). Once you get further into the book it slowly introduces some basic concepts of object oriented programming and gives you practical reasons to use them with XNA...as opposed to just handing you raw theory. That said...the book's coverage of HLSL (and 3d as it applies to XNA) is a bit shallow, so you should not expect to be an expert on XNA or anything, but it will give a starting point.
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