• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
lride

Why does my anti-virus program think my programs are suspicious?

13 posts in this topic

avast always interupts execution of my game saying my games can be threat.
why? why makes it think that only the programs I make are threats?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What is your virus scanner? If you are concerned contact the company and ask them what to do about false positives. Usually you can add it to a white list in your virus scanner if nothing else.
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is it not just windows complaining about the file not being signed ?
Does a straightforward hello world console program have the same issue ? Edited by SimonForsman
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you using GetAsyncKeyState() or similar functions? Kaspersky antivirus complains it could potentially be a keylogger.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use AVG and it has the habit of reporting any application with

std::cout << (int value) << std::endl;

as being a backdoor trojan. You can deal with it simply enough by disabling the anti-virus while you're developing, or finding a way to stop it from active scanning your projects folder. But when it comes time to release you'll probably have to test your executable against virus scanners for false positives. When it comes to releasing an executable in a world with crap virus scanners does anyone have any pre-release tips ? Because I'd like to hear them.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would upload all executable files to Virustotal.com because the website uses the most popular scanners and offers an impression of how the game will be handled after the release.
Now you have to wait about a week and then check your files again(because usually the submitted files will be forwarded to the anti-virus companies and checked again more carefully).
If there are any false-positives after the week, you have to contact the company behind the scanner, for Example [url="http://support.kaspersky.com/virlab/helpdesk.html"]http://support.kaspe...b/helpdesk.html[/url] for the Kaspersky Scanners.

Has anyone experience with the effect of signing executables with false-positives? Edited by Barbossa
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Avast (other than e.g. Kaspersky, which in my opinion used to be OK around 2008-2009, but is the worst ever malware [i]per se[/i], since then -- it renders my computer entirely unusable) does not complain about any of my own programs being malware.
It does show occasional false positives on some programs sometimes, but very very rarely. Usually it's a program like a CD ripper trying to get low level access to the drive.

Chances are good that what you see are still false positives, but my overall positive experience with Avast makes me think it isn't a bad idea to look into it anyway. It might still be that you [i]really [/i]have some malware on your system that infected your compiler/linker or a library. As suggested above, Virustotal is a relatively easy way of verifying. It also displays the SHA-1 and MD5 of the respective files, so in case you didn't record hashes in the past, you can look them up there. If they're the same, it's highly unlikely that something has modified your compiler (or another program).

That said, the tip of turning off scanning for the development folder and the build tool folder is a good idea regardless of this issue, because live scanning and live defence usually makes a build 30-50% slower. It depends on your AV software (Kaspersky slows you down whenever KAV is installed, whether it scans or not), but for Avast it really makes a difference.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have Avast free and it also reports every single application I make as malware and that I should run it in sandbox. I think it does that probably because it doesn't recognize the program. I have given up on avast and bought something a bit more normal, like webroot.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Avira Free Antivirus was even reporting "int main(){ return 0; }" has some virus.
I sent them false positive reports for a few months every week and things seem to be fine now.
During that time I worked around it by placing a "glVertex2f(0, 0);" call at the beginning of my code which obviously did nothing because the opengl context wasn't even created but was enough to disrupt the flawed heuristics of antivir.
Maybe it works for you, too.
If it doesn't you could
-try to restructure your code
-use some exotic compile options
-use some virus-like habits to hide your code (e.g. encode your code and decode it when in use)
-or spam the developer of your antivirus software until he responds
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is part of Avast's AutoSandbox feature. Go to Additional Protection->AutoSandbox and click on Settings. Turn it off.
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I personally know I don't have a virus that infects all exe's via an OS hook because when I hit a problem where AVG says something is a threat, I head off and build a second application to see if it does the same there.

As to relevance to this post: If your virus scanner reports an exe you built as a virus, build another simple program to see if you can manage to build an exe that isn't detected to be a virus, just to make sure you don't have some serious form of infection in your pc.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't have a real virus.
[quote name='MarkS' timestamp='1349997132' post='4989296']
This is part of Avast's AutoSandbox feature. Go to Additional Protection->AutoSandbox and click on Settings. Turn it off.
[/quote]
oh god thank you. I fixed it
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='lride' timestamp='1350005451' post='4989336']
oh god thank you. I fixed it
[/quote]

No problem! That was annoying the crap out of me as well. Couldn't compile an application without it being flagged. Even Morrowind and Skyrim (Avast must not like Bethesda) were flagged. I was about to uninstall Avast.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0