• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
fartheststar

File formats / resolution

5 posts in this topic

Hi all, My first post. I read back through quite a few posts on here with interest. Have sortof a technical question about the delivered product.

Q: Is there an FAQ that addresses file formats (like mp3, wav, other?), file resolution, and structure of audio files - especially loops - that are generally used in games? Do you supply several different components of a loop that the game engine integrates (sparse / medium/dense / action/ calm mix etc), or is it more generally a finished singular composition? something in between?

Appreciate any responses. Really I'm just trying to understand the necessary technical standards that audio needs to meet from a formating and deliverable perspective to easily integrate with the finished product.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mp3 or ogg-vorbis are often used for music.
Wav is often used for sound effects.
The bit resolution depends on the qualtity, from 8 bit, to more common 16 bit interger to float.
The frequency is often 40/48khz up to 96khz or higher, eventually it depends on the performance and hardware support, but sound APIs will support most of them.

Raw sound data from a library should have the highest quality, the sound engineer of the game will reduce the bit depth/frequency to meet the game requirements !

In games you have something from simple playback (playback a mp3 as background, add some interactive sound effects) up to an interactive, situation dependent,adaptive on-the-fly music composition (several channels are mixed on-the-fly). Edited by Ashaman73
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wanted to thank both for the replies on this. It helps alot to have this info - at least for me. I didn't realize ogg would be that widely used.

I was curious about the individual tracks vs. premixed tracks partially due to thinking about licensing of loops. My understanding is that royalty free loops (big fish and sony is what I have now and I make my own) but the licensing on the royalty free stuff means I have to change them to use them. Didn't know if there were concerns about unmixed loops used in games (as individual seperate tracks)- even if the final product is ultimately a mix that comes out of the speakers as a mix. Anybody had concerns / issues with that? I'm a total Noob - mostly a songwriter who likes organic instrumental stuff - and the licensing problems it seems you might get into can seem scary unless I do 100% my own loops / samples / sounds / recordings / etc.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ogg - I understand better now after reading your posts and this:

[url="http://happylinuxthoughts.blogspot.com/2007/10/what-hell-is-ogg-vorbis-and-why-should.html"]http://happylinuxtho...why-should.html[/url]

quote from site re ogg: "If you're a developer, there's a very large advantage. You can include sound files in your software and you won't pay any licensing fees at all."

and this:
[url="http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums//lofiversion/index.php/t30095.html"]http://www.hydrogena...php/t30095.html[/url]
"Bitrate for bitrate and file size for file size, I think Vorbis will always be better than MP3 at it's best." Edited by fartheststar
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_audio_formats"]This page[/url] is (somewhat) helpful. Particularly notice the Technical Details section (and General Information for encoder/decoder fees).

"Normal" audio is typically 44100Hz, 16-bit, lossy compressed (either with MP3, Vorbis, or AAC) with a data rate of ~192kbps, though the data rate frequently ranges from 128kbps to 320kbps.

Go with Vorbis if you can. The legal complexities are simpler, it offers great quality, and as Moritz P.G. Katz points out, it can properly loop (MP3s have a delay padding at the beginning and ending of the audio, so when you loop there's a noticeable gap, so it takes some extra work on your part to gaplessly loop them).
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0