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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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superman3275

Does Time "Fly" When You Program?

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When you're programming, does time just seem to slip away? I've been programming for 2 hours and it feels like five minutes! All in all, I've spent at least 15 hours programming this week, but it feels like far less time. So for you, does time seem to just "Fly" when you program, or does it inch away slowly? I'd love to hear your thoughts :)
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For me time definitely flies, especially if I'm trying to make something challenging work. Before I know it it's 10 hours later and I [i]really[/i] need to go to the bathroom.
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indeed, i started on what i'd thought would be a smaller section of my game a couple days ago at 10pm, and before i knew it, it was 9am when i was done.
but that occurs all the time, it's not uncommon to hear stuff like: "shit, it's already been another hour"

I think as a programmer(and really this applies to any profession), if your finding time is inching away(which means that your probably staring at the clock all the time), then it's likely programming isn't for you, since your probably not enjoying it. Edited by slicer4ever
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Yes, far too quickly too and I always question "wtf have I done today?", time flies by so quick I actually use 'Timeleft' to remind me when I have to go eat, work out and more importantly sleep, crazy I know but its so easy for me to ermm "turn into a zombie" (as my friends would say).

I guess its because I am having fun
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Yes, time does fly, and it kind of horrifies me. This summer I went on a week-long coding marathon, and I was disgusted by how inefficient I was. Noticing that 2 hours felt like 5 minutes made me want to make a conscious effort to get more done. But then that mental stress forced me to have to take 5 minute breaks every couple hours haha. So who knows if those breaks ate away a lot of the time I "saved".
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I think it's related to the phenomenon described in this article:

[url="http://blog.8thlight.com/uncle-bob/2012/04/20/Why-Is-Estimating-So-Hard.html"]http://blog.8thlight...ng-So-Hard.html[/url]
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Once in a great while, I'll make the mistake of coming home during a break or lunch and checking out some code... AAAAND break's over. :(
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I had a theory that the feeling of time flying has something to do with relativity and all the extra electrical activity in the brain. But I disregarded it when it occured to me that it feels like time goes so much slower when you're a kid and they have tons of extra energy.
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Actually it isn't effective. Yeah it's fun and entertaining but it's your time which you can spend on you friends (ie).

Edward de Bono (wrote many books about creative thinking) wrote in one of his books - limit the time for doing some task. It will grow your skill in creative thinking and effective work level too.

Don't you think so? Edited by AlexB.hpp
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