• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Can i become a professional gamedeveloper learning at home?

This topic is 1923 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

It's funny because I'm in the same boat. It's not even about trying to get into the game industry, but the programming industry in general. I'm still having trouble getting back into college, but I have the skills that put me on a level playing field with those with a Bachelor's, at least. It's unfortunate that those skills cannot be demonstrated to get to that interview, gaming or non gaming. So all I can do right now is keep studying and keeping making programs until one of them gets noticed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
I'm a 100% self-taught programmer and games/software developer... I've never taken a college course on programming, computer science or game/software development. In fact, I'm a college dropout... I had only 1 year and 1 semester of college before being forced to drop out to care for my grandparents on their deathbeds (mom had to work and lil bro was legally obligated to go to school). Everything I've learned comes from books, the internet, practice and experience; if used correctly, these resources can be every bit (or more) powerful than a classroom.

I got my first real job in the industry years ago without a problem. I was chosen over candidates who had college degrees, due to the extent of my programming knowledge and wide range of experience with writing all sorts of software (and because I knew several languages fluently). All it took was a resume detailing all of my experience and showing them some samples of my work -- even hobby and "academic" projects. It also helped that I had done a considerable amount of "freelance" work writing small bits of software, libraries and classes/components for small businesses and individuals. The point is that if you're the guy who's always willing to go the extra mile -- do things better, learn more stuff, keep up with new developments in the technological world -- then you can beat people with formal training/education.

All programmers are "self-taught" to some extent. If you don't have the passion/motivation to teach yourself to further/better your skills outside of a classroom then you'll never become a good programmer! But all this aside having a college degree is a major advantage. It's essentially "proof" that you've played the game of school and know your stuff. I strongly suggest going to college and getting a degree. I'm 24 now, and doing well without a degree and running my own business, but I plan to go back to college. It's just something one should do in life, if anything for the experience...

Regards,

--ATC--

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would like to know this myself, as a musician.

I have been playing music for a while. I may or may not go to school for it. I have put in 3 years of study getting proficient at the bass and classical guitar, as well as reading music and learning music theory. I would like to go to my local community college for Entertainment Technology, but they are in the middle of a crazy fiasco with mis-managed funds and such. I will probably take online classes through Berklee for composition

in the 10 days since joining this site, I have done a very large amount of composing. It's absolutely terrible but I've put it out there for people to criticize anyways. (Shameless soundcloud plug: http://soundcloud.com/you/tracks)

I hear a lot of this in the music business. Anything is possible. But let me posit a question: Why is school not worth it to you, and what are you replacing it with? I take private lessons, gig with bands, compose, learn new instruments, and surround myself with music. Are you surrounding yourself with game development the way you should be? Exploring every avenue? Can you be your own businessman, accountant, PR rep, manager, and anything else the job calls for? I used to think this only applied to music, but as my parents open their own businesses (my dad doing Software consulting, application design etc. and my mom with a zombie apparel company) I'm quickly realizing this applies to any "self-made" pursuit

If so then yes, but I don't see the thought in not going to school. Especially if, as has been said here, you will go for free and even receive living expenses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement