• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
bowlie

Making my first game

8 posts in this topic

I have made pong, and now i want to make a simple game. Its going to be a tactical stratergy shooter, similar to xcom, or combat missions. Would it be possible to make this game look nice in 2D, or would i have to go 3D for the idea to work fully? Thanks, Bowlie
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not familiar with this series: X-Com, after a quick Wikipedia I see that they have several titles with a recent 3D release. What is it they have made in the past that you are trying to emulate. This will give the community a chance to feedback what might be appropriate for your level.

Regards,

Stitchs.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's a bit too big of a step but you can always have a go at it. 2D can be as beautiful as you want, you just dont have the luxury to have a moving camera and have some shots at different angles. But you can certainly achieve better graphics then the original series.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the replies. My idea was to start this game, and run it parallel to doing other tutorials, so, when i get stuck at a point, find a tutorial on the subject, complete it and then adapt it to my game.

The actual game itself is set in a space ship overrun by baddies. You command a group of people, and you have to survive. I think i will make it in 2D and use an isometric view. At this stage, i want to make a room, and have some goodies and baddies shooting each other. I have lots of features i want to add, but they are for a far distant future. Im using XNA and c#.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Pointer2APointer' timestamp='1350332244' post='4990500']
It's a bit of an unreasonable stretch to attempt to make a game like XCOM, 2D or not, after making pong.

If you made pong, didn't you realize the difficulty of it just for such simple instances(two paddles, one ball, reversing velocity)?

There's no comparison from a simple pong game, even an advanced one, to a fully-fledged commercial-quality game series like XCOM.

I'd suggest you start smaller and work your way into larger, more complex scaled games.
[/quote]

Absolutely. Upvote for you.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='bowlie' timestamp='1350335674' post='4990523']
Thanks for the replies. My idea was to start this game, and run it parallel to doing other tutorials, so, when i get stuck at a point, find a tutorial on the subject, complete it and then adapt it to my game.

The actual game itself is set in a space ship overrun by baddies. You command a group of people, and you have to survive. I think i will make it in 2D and use an isometric view. At this stage, i want to make a room, and have some goodies and baddies shooting each other. I have lots of features i want to add, but they are for a far distant future. Im using XNA and c#.
[/quote]

You will find yourself abandoning the project because you eventually realize it is a inefficient mess. What i did after my pong game is making a arkanoid clone and added some extra gameplay to it. After that i had a couple of fail projects like you then started a tower defense and prototyping all kinds of elements games have.

You always have the freedom to take any project on and learn from your experiences, we all have our fair share of fail projects [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]. If you really want to go for it i suggest to try to get a basic tilemap going on, maybe randomizing it, then make it isometric (like the original xcom games where). Then create a unit to walk the map, get a pathfinding system going on. And by this time you have ran into a ton of problems and are a couple of months down the road, without anything that looks like a game, but with experience. Edited by menyo
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Steady growth is superior to growth spurts here and there.

Better to cimb a mountain step by step rather than trying to run, skip, hop, pogo stick, etc, your way to the top of a very high peak. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

If you want to repeat make games, then you will have to study the path along the way for the return trips. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/wink.png[/img]


Clinton
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I completely agree with 3dDreamer. I started out with pong, and it was an extreme learning experience. I learned about state machines, libraries, distribution, animation, logic, object oriented vs. procedural programming and when to apply both, API development (Skip a few paragraphs down to see what I mean), etc.

API Development:
I have an API out called simplebutton. How did I make it? I created a main menu, saw common functionality. I started building up a codebase around that, adding features all the time. It's an open-source project and I'm very proud of it, even if only a few people besides me use it.

State Machines:
Figuring out how to know when the User was playing, in the main menu, in the game over screen, in the credits, etc. puzzled me, and I implemented an extremely simple (It's pong!) self programmed state-machine.

Libraries:
Using libraries like SFML / Box2d. I learned a lot more about how libraries work and where I can get them. Considering that finding a library with common functionality is far better then coding something yourself, this was important to helping me decrease development time and find resources.

Distribution:
Well, I had to figure out how to get other people to play Pong (E-Mailing it to someone who doesn't program, etc.) involved distribution. Release mode, static-linking, and putting together projects were all things I had to learn about.

Animation:
I learned about using velocity vs. speed, how to move sprites, sprites vs. images, etc. How do you think I displayed the main menu! Or the Game Over Screen! Or the Paddles and the Ball! Figuring out how to get the other paddle to always follow the ball really made me think about how I could make a more realistic and flexible system, and definitely taught me more about animation.

Logic:
Using the logical operators to check for collision, implement my state machine, check values, etc. was extremely important. Those were the building blocks for the beginning of my API, all the Collision, and a lot of the State Machine. I walked away with a better understanding of their uses and limitations.

Object Oriented vs. Procedural Programming:
When I first tried to make pong everything was procedural. I was scared of stepping out of my comfort zone and creating my own classes. Then, it failed miserably. I went back to the drawing board, using many classes, and many functions also. The result was bug-free code that ran on the first try. This taught me A LOT about what objects can store, object's limitations, and how I can implement functions. It also forced me to use many design patterns and become a better programmer at large.


So, the short answer is everything is a learning experience. You may try doing this ^^^ Many times, and every time you'll try something new, and learn new things. If you want to do this, by all means do it. It will undoubtedly make you a better programmer, and even if you only get some functionality down / don't make a working game, you'll have learned something new through trial, error, and experience.
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0