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superman3275

How much experience is enough experience?

8 posts in this topic

I believe I'm now a mildy experienced game programmer. I've programmed breakout, and am still adding things to it. (As soon as there's three powerups and a dynamic main menu I'll stop [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]). I started with pong, and have experienced collision detection. I'm also working on a map editor and a state machine. So my question is, is this enough?

So, when do I cross the line to start making my own games? Could I do it now, or maybe I should knock of tetris. The reason I believe I'm ready is because whenever I think about lots of these classic games, I could program them. There aren't even trouble spots in my mind. Do you think I'm ready to embark on the game I want to make right now?

I want to make a rogue rpg. Not a big one, just a mildly small, basic one. Then I would improve from there. Do you think that's feasible? Or maybe I should knock off some more games, get some more experience? What are your thoughts? Also, about my updated signature, I've been doing photo editing for a long time now, and I have some really cool samples of personal work, if anyone wants to PM or Email me, I'll show you my work and if you want, I'll be happy to help with indie games for free [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]! Edited by superman3275
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Well, there's no harm in considering something slightly more challenging.

Okay, here's one for you...

Played Legend of Zelda for the NES? No? Then go play it for about 10 minutes and then try and create something similar - a game world of about...3 * 3 screens where your character can walk about and add some bushes or other obstacles - perhaps throw in an enemy for the player to kill...

Reckon you can do it?
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[quote name='superman3275' timestamp='1350678247' post='4991911']
So my question is, is this enough?
[/quote]

You have "eager itch" !

It's like a back itch: You can satisy it now with your finger nails but no guarantee of being satisfied or you can prepare by going to grab a proper back scratch implement which is sure to do the job.

... purely your choice... If you are superman enough to take the shortcut, then go ahead!


[quote name='superman3275' timestamp='1350678247' post='4991911']
So, when do I cross the line to start making my own games?
[/quote]

My opinion is when you have a broad enough foundation, competent in each major area of the target game of your dreams, then you are ready to make your own games. The sooner you rush into them, then the more the inferior coding will be in those first several original games.

I know an expert C++ and another expert C# software engineer, each leading teams - you know: lead programmers. They urge that learners progress carefully to avoid bad programming habits. Bad habits take much longer to correct than the time taken to progress in orderly fashion. This is standard for highly skilled professions.


[quote name='superman3275' timestamp='1350678247' post='4991911']I want to make a rogue rpg. Not a big one, just a mildly small, basic one. Then I would improve from there. Do you think that's feasible? Or maybe I should knock off some more games, get some more experience? What are your thoughts[/quote]

If it is only a hobby, then do what your conscience and desire lead you to do.

If you aspire in the gaming industry, then you should search for orderly progression in your learning according to clear long term goals, making changes as needed in due time. Everything which you use in the first five to ten games will be a basis for your future programming.

Seek variety [u]now[/u] in the learning stage while you have the freedom of choice and no deadlines! You are laying the foundation upon which much will be built in the future! Once you start building on that foundation, making changes will be possible but much more difficult such as correcting bad programming habits. Lay a good basic foudation of knowledge [i]and[/i] understanding!

Clinton
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