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Necrosis

Question about version numbers

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Necrosis    150
This has been something I''ve been wondering about for a long time, but haven''t put much research into. It''s obvious most if not all games use a form of version numbering. I know that with updated versions, bug fixes and such, these version numbers go up. But what I''m wondering, is there some standard method people follow to determine version numbers, and how much "work" constitues an incriment in verison numbers? Or perhaps each company has their own "format" on versioning? Perhaps it''s something each developer makes up on their own? I know that some companies use build numbers and other quirks. I''m just curious. Oh, and if there are standard methods, could I be directed to somewhere I can read up on it? Thanks Never forget, All your base are belong to us!

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Gladiator    127
Well, version numbers are up to you, there's no standard way. What's "considered" standard, is that with any major changes in your code you up your version number by 1 unit (depending on how you choose to change the version number). Otherwise if you fix a few bugs for example that are nothing major then you add like the smallest unit you are using.

let's say your current version is 1.1...

you change a few things... you have 1.2

you change some more thing (more than before) you go to 1.4 or 1.5

maybe some more bug fixes you go 1.7

then you change a lot so maybe the changes become obvios like the wya you draw things the speed of the game new concepts introduced into your game etc... you change to 2.0.. and go on from there...

that's the way i usually do it, but in general it's up to the programmer to decide how you calculate your versoin..

if you need more help ask away....

EDIT: go here to see what versoin numbers mean.
hope this helps

Edited by - Gladiator on October 14, 2001 2:35:55 PM

Edited by - Gladiator on October 14, 2001 2:37:03 PM

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Necrosis    150
Ah, that satisfied my curiosity. Thanks

LMAO, I enjoyed the link!

Never forget, All your base are belong to us!

Edited by - SirSmoke on October 14, 2001 3:04:34 PM

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Oluseyi    2116
Some projects use the odd-even numbering convention. Odd minor version numbers (minor versions are the numbers after the decimal point) represent a work in progress while even minor verions are "finished" or "release." This is most common in Open Source projects, but it might be useful as an internal convention for your team.

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Colin Jeanne    1114
I think that many people use major version numbers to represent a point in their program that they feel is a milestone. The minor version numbers then represent the addition or fixing of a few parts to reach the next milestone.

For me, my program is never 1.0 until I feel satisfied with it. When I come up with a large new plan of stuff to add to it that becomes my goal for 2.0 or 3.0 etc. I choose the minor numbers because I either think they make the version number look good or I picked a random number.

Invader X
Invader''s Realm

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Necrosis    150
This is extremely interesting, hearing how everyone handles Version numbering in their own way

Never forget, All your base are belong to us!

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Colin Jeanne    1114
There are many different ways.

Winamp ALWAYS has a x.666 version of their program. One game I play has a short paragraph in the readme.txt file about his version numbers. He uses the numbers 7, 21, 42, and whatever he thinks looks good. He uses 42 because it''s a reference to "Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy", 21 because I think it was his age an a multiple of 42, 7 because its a multiple of 21. He also completely skipped a major version of 13 for superstitious reasons.

Invader X
Invader''s Realm

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Dean Harding    546
I like the microsoft way of version stuff. First we have windows 3.0 (I don''t know if anyone ever actually saw 1.0 or 2.0, though they did exist) then 3.1, then we had a big jump to 95 (what happened to version 4 through 94?), then 98, then another big jump to 2000 (we missed over 1900 version numbers this time!) and now they''re using letters of the alphabet! I guess they figured they''d have to move up to "Windows 15,000", just to keep the same exponential trend going, and just figured they may as well use Roman Numerals or something...


codeka.com - Just click it.

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krez    443
i had windows v1.0, back in the day... it was kinda like the file manager, but with even less functionality. i only used it once, then decided it was too much effort to run a program just to give me a way to run ms-dos programs without typing.

--- krez (krezisback@aol.com)

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