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ISDCaptain01

Still possible to use directx 8?

12 posts in this topic

I just want to use it for learning purposes. There is abook I want to get but unfortunately it is outdated and uses DX8.
Is it still possible to use DX8? If so how?
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It works that way for the runtime, but does it work that way for the SDK too? I honestly don't know the answer, but I'd be surprised to learn that the SDK itself is backwards compatible (in other words, that the June 2010 DrectX SDK includes interface definitions and associated bits to be able to program against all of the older versions.) Then again, maybe they did up to a point.
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[quote name='Ravyne' timestamp='1351046756' post='4993321']
It works that way for the runtime, but does it work that way for the SDK too? I honestly don't know the answer, but I'd be surprised to learn that the SDK itself is backwards compatible (in other words, that the June 2010 DrectX SDK includes interface definitions and associated bits to be able to program against all of the older versions.) Then again, maybe they did up to a point.
[/quote]

Yeah ive been wondering that too. in the meantime i found this:
[url="http://www.oldversion.com/DirectX.html"]http://www.oldversion.com/DirectX.html[/url]
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[quote name='Ravyne' timestamp='1351046756' post='4993321']
It works that way for the runtime, but does it work that way for the SDK too? I honestly don't know the answer, but I'd be surprised to learn that the SDK itself is backwards compatible (in other words, that the June 2010 DrectX SDK includes interface definitions and associated bits to be able to program against all of the older versions.) Then again, maybe they did up to a point.
[/quote]
If you install the latest SDK from msdn you will only be able to access the C++ API bindings for DX 9.0c, 10 and 11. You need to find an old DX8 SDK installer somewhere if they are still arround on the web somewhere.
Starting with DX8 is a bad idea, 9 completely redesigned the API and this happened again for 10 and 11, although 11 is very similar to 10 this is just a minor change.

I would suggest you start with learning DX11 instead as that will be the most future proof to learn DX programming from. Edited by NightCreature83
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Reading this I'm just curious what language you'll be using? C++? C#?

The reason I ask is I have been learning C# and SlimDX and tried to go via DX9 just so I could match up with the book I was learning from. In the end, I regretted it. The overhead associated with using dated technology might not seem that great at the start - but it's significant in my opinion. I have been using a DX11 book based on C++, even though I'm using C# - but the book has still been extremely useful.

If you're using C# and XNA then I'd say don't bother with DX8 at all, as wouldn't you want to know DX9 anyway?

So go straight for DX11 in my view. It will be worth it in the long-run.
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it's also important to note that DX8 is not representative anymore of modern GPU rendering techniques. I doubt the book you have goes for a "shader only" approach, in those days shaders were quite an exotic addition. So you'll find yourself facing a huge API with lots of states to set, a major departure for the modern graphics API all streamlined to support data forwarding from user code and shaders.
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[quote name='kseh' timestamp='1351100979' post='4993482']
I'm missing out on being able to make use of functionality that's pretty standard and simple these days.
[/quote]

+1 for this; it's a very key point. Sticking with the fixed pipeline will just put brick walls in front of you and horribly restrain you any time you want to do anything beyond the pre-canned blending modes. D3D8 [i]does[/i] have shaders, but they're woefully primitive and not being able to rely on basic stuff like e.g. dependent texture reads is really constraining. It [i]is[/i] possible to hack something together with some creative use of the bumpenvmap stuff, but that's also horrible to use and quite restrictive.

The best way to view 8 is as a short-lived interim version between 7 and 9 (just like the early shading models were interim between fixed pipeline and SM2/3), but if you're starting out new you no doubt have ambitions and ideas for cool things you'd like to do, and 8 is just going to depress and disappoint you in that regard.

That doesn't make it bad - it was [i]awesome[/i] in it's time and especially compared to what went before, but it was of it's time and that time is long passed.
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[quote name='kseh' timestamp='1351100979' post='4993482']
The only reason I continue to use it is due to the limitations of my development machine.
[/quote]
Jesus christ, how old is your development machine. My laptop is 4 years old with an incredibly crummy (and old at the time) intel integrated GPU and still happily chugs along with directx 9 (bar generally low framerate) and Dx10 in software drawing mode. 11 it doesn't like.
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[quote name='6677' timestamp='1351193631' post='4993895']
[quote name='kseh' timestamp='1351100979' post='4993482']
The only reason I continue to use it is due to the limitations of my development machine.
[/quote]
Jesus christ, how old is your development machine. My laptop is 4 years old with an incredibly crummy (and old at the time) intel integrated GPU and still happily chugs along with directx 9 (bar generally low framerate) and Dx10 in software drawing mode. 11 it doesn't like.
[/quote]

I used 9 on a late 2005/early 2006 vintage laptop once; did a lot of development on it and generally had a good(ish) time. It had Intel 915 graphics, SM2 capability (but with the VS stage emulated in software - no big deal for that particular machine) and I was quite impressed by how capable the machine actually was given it's specs and age (I eventually ended up giving it to a friend for her college work and it finally died earlier this year; quite a good innings and huge value for money).

For the kind of more limited program you'd write on that class of machine, and which you would be restricted to with 8 or below [i]anyway[/i], 9 is perfectly viable.

Here's the thing.

D3D9 is capable of running on, and will work perfectly well with, more downlevel hardware. Just detect the caps at startup and don't do anything that's not supported, and it will work.
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