• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
SherrelE

What's the deal with IDE's?

14 posts in this topic

Hello all
Let me start upfront by saying that I'm much more into the art side of development, I'm not knowledgable in any way about programming, never done it before except for one Hello World script in C++. To do that, however, I used Code::Blocks along with allegro installed. But I've heard a lot of stuff about Code::Blocks, saying that it crashes too often, and such. Would that be a problem if I were to pursue programming? Would there be an advantage to choosing a different IDE? I understand the layout would be different, but other than that, what would change?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='SherrelE' timestamp='1351210828' post='4993975']
Hello all
Let me start upfront by saying that I'm much more into the art side of development, I'm not knowledgable in any way about programming, never done it before except for one Hello World script in C++. To do that, however, I used Code::Blocks along with allegro installed. But I've heard a lot of stuff about Code::Blocks, saying that it crashes too often, and such. Would that be a problem if I were to pursue programming? Would there be an advantage to choosing a different IDE? I understand the layout would be different, but other than that, what would change?
[/quote]
Visual studio Express or CodeBlocks, used both.
Visual studio, Easy to use, easy to start with, gave me headache about linking. All together it gave me allot of problems.
Codeblocks. Makes problems like not displaying include path for you, not displaying a class you just made and stuff like that therefor forces you to remember,
annoying and just bad but just what i want, to know/.

If you are freshman visual studio express is awesome cause its more "NOOB" friendly.
Never had clodeblocks crash on me... not a single time. Also it has auto save... just turn it on and set it to like 5 min and your fine. "Setting->Enviroment[]->Autosave and tick those on.
I believe you meant that your .exe file crashes not the codeblocks it self.

Ive started about 4years ago with youtube tutorials. Then it seemed fine, but now with my knowledge i can say that 60% of tutorials i watched people talked bullshit and didn't teach properly. Even now i cant find a proper c++ tutorials cause id take you days about a subject and each video is minutes long but each one provides a bit of info just strap it all together in time, good luck! Edited by BaneTrapper
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Every (major) IDE has its pros and cons. Said that either Visual Studio, Code::Blocks and even Eclipse (with CDT) are able to handle larger projects. I have used Eclipse quite a bit under linux and i quite like it. However under windows I prefer Visual Studio mainly because of the debugger, because IMO having a good and easy to use debugger can save you a lot of nerves.

If you just start out with coding choose the IDE that feels the easiest to use for you. VS is quite beginner-friendly because it works out of the box, while eclipse needs some tweaking to get it running for C++-Development.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
if you have access to MSDN AA or a friend who works for MS you can get the full versions of Visual Studio for a decent price as well. The plus point of getting the full version of it is that you can install plugins that help during development, like resharper and Vissual Assist X. One of the things major IDEs always miss for C++ is refactor tools.

I personnally don't like eclipse for compiled language development, but this has historic issues and might actually be fixed now. Another decent IDE is Netbeans which is free and is as easy to use as Visual Studio
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='SherrelE' timestamp='1351210828' post='4993975']
Hello all
Let me start upfront by saying that I'm much more into the art side of development, I'm not knowledgable in any way about programming, never done it before except for one Hello World script in C++. To do that, however, I used Code::Blocks along with allegro installed. But I've heard a lot of stuff about Code::Blocks, saying that it crashes too often, and such. Would that be a problem if I were to pursue programming? Would there be an advantage to choosing a different IDE? I understand the layout would be different, but other than that, what would change?
[/quote]

Do you plan to pursue programming as independent discipline or are you more interested in developing games and using programming only as much as is needed?
In the latter case you probably should choose game engine/editor first and then an IDE that is either integrated into it or plays nicely with it. For example Unity has integrated MonoDevelop - you can replace it but unless you know very well what you are doing it is usually best use the default option.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've never had Code::Blocks crash on me during the year I used it as a portable app at school, but I would prefer Visual Studio. First of all, VS has a great debugger (yes I know everybody says this). It will save you a LOT of time and hair when you want to pull it out. On the other hand, VS uses it's own compiler and linker and you will have problems when you want to use a library that isn't built for VS.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Lauris Kaplinski' timestamp='1351260358' post='4994140']
[quote name='SherrelE' timestamp='1351210828' post='4993975']
Hello all
Let me start upfront by saying that I'm much more into the art side of development, I'm not knowledgable in any way about programming, never done it before except for one Hello World script in C++. To do that, however, I used Code::Blocks along with allegro installed. But I've heard a lot of stuff about Code::Blocks, saying that it crashes too often, and such. Would that be a problem if I were to pursue programming? Would there be an advantage to choosing a different IDE? I understand the layout would be different, but other than that, what would change?
[/quote]

Do you plan to pursue programming as independent discipline or are you more interested in developing games and using programming only as much as is needed?
In the latter case you probably should choose game engine/editor first and then an IDE that is either integrated into it or plays nicely with it. For example Unity has integrated MonoDevelop - you can replace it but unless you know very well what you are doing it is usually best use the default option.
[/quote]

Actually the latter is exactly my intention, however I find that knowing how to program to a decent degree would be extensively helpful. You brought up monodevelop, honestly I'm a little embarassed to have overlooked that option, lol. I figured going straight to the use of an IDE would be best. That's a good suggestion though, thank you.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have used Code::Blocks nightlies as my main IDE since one of its first releases in '05 or '06.
Since I use nightlies and not the stable builds (there are not many of them and they are quickly horribly outdated), there have been issues from time to time with certain builds, such as frequent crashes or features not working properly, but the developers have always responded quickly to any feedback on their forums. If one particular build annoys you, you can always use a former until the issues are fixed (usually does not take more than 1 or 2 newer builds iff you report the issue).
For instance, in the current Windows build (8438), I have issues with CB's "image" freezing as a screen overlay when (sometimes) minimizing, forcing me to restart CB (but everything is saved, so not a big deal), though the Debian build (Jens') is working perfectly.
Like JTippets said, just save often enough, make use of autosave, or do as I and use both (since I will never trust autosaving features [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png[/img]). Edited by nife87
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use vim, with a few selected plugins.

If you're looking to become a programmer, I would recommend starting with a decent text editor, and then moving to an IDE.

Some will probably disagree with me, but I think you would learn more that way.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A long time ago I've tried Code::Blocks but couldn't get it to debug. At least not with a gui, maybe some cryptic command line would have helped. But no problems on Eclipse/Qtcreator/VC2010express.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use Code::Blocks mainly and I've never had it crash once on me. To debug with it, you need to make sure all the debug symbols are enabled and optimizations disabled, and make sure the variable window is actually visible (plus the CPU register window, if you are doing inline assembly) so you can see what's going on. It's not Visual Studio with beautiful mouseover treeview-like displays, but it does work.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0