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rawfle

Quality of mobile gaming?

3 posts in this topic

No matter how old you are or how long your gaming history is, the chances are you still remember what intially caught your attention, sometimes for hours. That something that makes a game a game, that amalgamation of shapes, colors, sounds mixed in with emotions. With time, the standards for gaming have changed drastically, what we look for in games has stayed the same. With the gaming market rapidly growing, especially in the mobile domain, everybody is trying to get a piece of the cake that is made up of the mobile gaming industry. More often than not, instead of producing something unique, something really worth playing, developers sacrifice quality over time and development costs. Sometimes, the lack of imagination is at fault. Finding a game on the mobile platform, that provides a truly immersive and intruiding experience requires alot of effort to say the least. It seems that rather than creating something new and unique, developers are trying to ride the wave of success of other developers by producing similarly built games with only a few changeups in overall gameplay. I can not be the only one who gets the feeling that the mobile gaming industry is just about copying each other, who can make the best knock-off of a knock-off. Imagination and creativity have been abandoned, the greatness of a game is only valued of it ability to generate income, not paying attention to whether it actually serves its purpose.
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[quote name='rawfle' timestamp='1351266642' post='4994178']It seems that rather than creating something new and unique, developers are trying to ride the wave of success of other developers by producing similarly built games with only a few changeups in overall gameplay.[/quote]

Seems to me like the industry has always been this way. Remember the zillions of maze games, Space Invaders clones, and a market flooded with home pong clones? Sure, there were more unique offerings then, but when you start with nothing, it's not difficult to create something new or unique. :)

[quote name='rawfle' timestamp='1351266642' post='4994178']the greatness of a game is only valued of it ability to generate income[/quote]

As far as industry is concerned, isn't that the ultimate goal? You won't find too many people with the resources to produce a AAA or AA title who are concerned more with "bringing their vision to life" than they are about turning a profit.

How to you propose that the problem you identify be addressed?
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Well the mobile game industry is a pick and go industry. So a lot of the games you see now are just rehashes of what's been before? Why? Because a lot of folks already know those games. Plus the games are easier to create/churn not. Phones are not meant to compete with the PS3. Just to fill up that boring space of time you have. So yeah, So yeah game Y is a better version of game X, therefore more fun to play. If you want to rally for ingenuity and originality, the consoles and PCs should have your attention, IMO.
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I'd say there are lots of innovative games too, that use the uniqueness of the platform to deliver an experience you don't get in any other format.

But of course there are a lot of similarities and out right copycats, because it is really hard to create something entirely new.
And don't confuse game genres with copycats, there is nothing wrong with making another tower defense, if you think you can make a really fun one.
(although, personally, I'd try to find a less crowded genre :) )

Also, the format promotes short play sessions, most people play mobile games to fill out the waiting parts of normal life, on the bus, before a meeting, etc.
So most successful games center around a simple mechanic, that is fun to repeat. Edited by Olof Hedman
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