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Xanather

Am I slow at developing?

12 posts in this topic

I really feel like it takes me too long to accomplish things.

Just now I wrote a chat window for my game, not including the inherited window class, but like programming up a textbox (to input text) etc... Writing up this chat window took me 2-3 hours (that includes textbox graphics, but not the actual window graphics due to the inheritance available). I haven't even handled server/client chat messages yet.

Chat Window:
[img]http://www.xanather.com/justapic.png[/img]
Will I ever get faster/better at writing algorithms? Ive been programming on and off ever since I was 12/13, I am now 17.

This is probably a very vague question, but yeah, what do other programmers think?
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Both posts make sense. Thanks for the replies Bacterius and radioteeth. I probably am going fast enough after reading your two posts, and of course I program for fun :D

Thanks again,
Xanather.
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Probably 2/3 coding and 1/3 making the textbox in paint.net, I don't think I looked on the web at all for this.
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I'm also pretty slow, at least I feel that way, but I think of it like this. Quality vs Speed, and if I spend too long at any part of the process it must have been for a good reason.

-Exo
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Most of the time speed of development is based more on personal motivation than actual ability. I find that sometimes I work at a crawl because I am doing something boring (like implementing a web service client) and I can't be bothered. Other times I get into the "zone" and will work for hours non-stop until I run out of steam (high caffeine content drinks help with this :)). So just go with the flow.
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When I was younger I was a pretty slow programmer. I used to obsess over the smallest details, reading all the docs even for little things like opening a window or doing a file requester. I used to love dwelling on the *feeling* of programming, if that doesn't sound too strange. It was just time and experience that made me speed up.

Working in web app development certainly helped me; the turnaround time for a site is so fast. Also, before I was in work, I found that doing little projects for other people helped, as I felt obliged to them to get the job done quickly.

Also, a lot of very fast people are doing things that are variants of what they've done before. In game coding in particular there's a lot of experimentation going on, a lot of groping in the dark. But that experimentation leads to new techniques, which you can then apply quickly.

In my current project, it took me absolutely ages to figure out how to do the graphics. Now I have a technique down that lets me produce new stuff in the same style in no time at all.

Like Cromulent, I find boring stuff slows me down. My boss once complained to me about some dull project taking ages. He said he couldn't understand it as it was so easy. I told him, "If it was difficult I would have done it in an afternoon".

I'm sure you'll get quicker with time and practice, just keep coding!
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I read somewhere that Bill Gates is known to have said that there can be as much as a 10000 factor between a slow developer and a quick developer. (he was probably talking about value : e.g. return on "investment". investment being salary here.)
My experience is that speed is roughly close between programmers, maybe a factor of 5 maximum between somebody fast and somebody slow. However, there are other factors that count for the final result. it is not only sheer speed, but for a given wanted result, the choice of the path to that result. for a given path, everybody will take around the same time. But let's take the example of your chat window. You didn't have to customize completely this window, you wanted it that way, but you could get a basic working result in a few minutes with C#, VB.net or Qt Designer.
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depends. what was it written in? c, assembly? win32, or some other low level API?

C# & Java are on higher levels, but their problem is that the layers cause you to learn
less and remember more, imo
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As other people have said programming speed depends upon experience with a certain module, and the code you have laying around. Keeping a code base speeds things up drastically, so does using whatever code base you can that you know you can rely on, example: stl.

How long does it take to code something? Between 15 minutes and 2 days. Depending upon past experience with concepts the same as or similar to what is being done. Researching a new topic is very, very time expensive. Researching stuff in your off time, with attempted randomness or some measure of foresight; will save you hours when you're on the clock facing deadlines.
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[quote name='hit' timestamp='1351657264' post='4995691']
depends. what was it written in? c, assembly? win32, or some other low level API?

C# & Java are on higher levels, but their problem is that the layers cause you to learn
less and remember more, imo
[/quote]

C# with XNA. So its quite "high-level".
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