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dakota.potts

When the inspiration won't come...

13 posts in this topic

What do you do? I've landed a project with a mobile game and I'm really happy with the team. We are all starting from scratch and things are going well. I have a character theme done as well as a variation for use in a different context.

Lately I've been trying to come up with more and the inspiration isn't always there. Sometimes I can't get out what's in my head and it drives me crazy and makes me frustrated to the point I can't really focus anymore, and sometimes I just can't think of anything interesting. I usually pick up my classical guitar when this happens, or go watch or play something that inspires me, but nothing has come of that lately and I feel like it's wasting time. What do you do?
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You mentioned that the whole team is "starting from scratch" -- does this mean that a lot of the characters and levels haven't been created yet? If you're having trouble finding inspiration it might be better to hold off until some more of the visual and programming work has been done so that you can see some of the characters, environments, and maybe even a playable level in action to help spark ideas and maybe give you something more tangible to base your music and sounds on.

Other than that, perhaps just try taking a good break, playing other games, listening to other music, etc. so you can approach it fresh.


Note that I'm only an infrequent hobbyist composer, so take my advice with a grain of salt, but I hope that helps! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
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If I normally feel like I'm getting frustrated with myself I take a break. For me forcing creativity never ever works so I just have a break for a few hours and I find that its come back to me. Once you start getting experienced it gets easier and easier to turn your "creative switch" on and I've found that just doing a little bit everyday no matter what helps with this.

Hope this helps :)
Caleb
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[quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1351398818' post='4994632']
You mentioned that the whole team is "starting from scratch" -- does this mean that a lot of the characters and levels haven't been created yet? If you're having trouble finding inspiration it might be better to hold off until some more of the visual and programming work has been done so that you can see some of the characters, environments, and maybe even a playable level in action to help spark ideas and maybe give you something more tangible to base your music and sounds on.
[/quote]

Amen to that! I was on one project where I had exactly no idea what to write, and the reason was because I had no idea what type of environment, character, or level construct I was writing for! Of course, after seeing a screenshot, I realized that I would have written the song an entirely different way... Edited by M4uesviecr
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"Writer's block" is a self-fulfilling prophecy, like worrying about getting to sleep. Creativity isn't something to be caught in the wind and coveted, turning it on like a tap is a skill that, like all other skills, needs to be developed. Enforcing time constraints is a good exercise for developing this skill but it takes motivation and self-discipline to actually enforce such constraints as it's easier to slip into old habits when things go good or bad or when you don't take the constraints seriously unless the constraints are real (i.e. work time constraints). If you worry about inspiration and treat it as some fleeting resource then you are only reinforcing the bad habit of writer's block in your mind. Once you stop treating it like a demon and instead treat it as the symptom of inexperience in a skill area that needs to be practised then it becomes more manageable. Edited by GeneralQuery
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Hello all,

It is a new project started from scratch, however, some progress has been made. Character designs have been done for a couple of characters. One I was able to write for. The problem started when trying to write for the other character. I could not, for the life of me, get it to come out of my head the way I wanted it to, and when I finally did, I wasn't feeling it anymore.
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maybe this sounds stupid, but i always take a bath ore shower,and usually something pops in my head.relaxing is the key (this works with me maybe it could work for you.)[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
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I am back to working and realized I just had to press on.

Apparently my dad goes through this with his interns. They overthink and analyze and can sometimes freeze because they think their code will never be great, yada yada. It's a common thing for him to struggle to get them to understand "The important thing is just to code, it can be the worst code in the world, it doesn't even have to work, just do it."

I've always been that way, so it's something I'll have to remember, in addition to much of the excellent advice above.
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Relaxed concentration/focus seems to be the key to me. When my attention-span and focus is up I seem to flow through tracks better.

Relax and focus on the music. Its all about having fun
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I find my best ideas come when I remove myself from the task completely. I can sit in my studio for hours and hours and in the end, all I've done is look at my equipment. Soon as I put some distance between me and my stuff (taking a walk, cooking some food, playing a game or watching a film) ideas start to come. Not always doable I guess, but where you can, just give yourself (and your mind) time and space to breathe!
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