• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Forenkazan

confused beginner artist

9 posts in this topic

hello

me and my fiends are going to start indie game development studio. We have a programer , game designer and i am the artist.

but iam confused

can someone answer my questions ?

1- which is better: Draw on paper - Draw on ipad (using SketchBook Pro) - Draw on PC

2- if on PC which program should i use ?

3- Which program is better for drawing ?

4- Which program is better for painting ?

5- what are the differences between PS and illustrator ?


Thank you very much ^^
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Considering your questions, I think you would do better with traditional media right now (pen/pencil and paper)
You would need a tablet to paint on a PC, and that would take some practice.
I'm not really familiar with the limitations of the iPad - I know [url="http://broadviewgraphics.blogspot.co.il/"]Robh Ruppel[/url] uses it to great effect for his concept art, but to go from there to creating assets for games?

Illustrator is a vector based program, while Photoshop and Painter and Raster.
In a raster program each pixel stores color information which is why it is better suited for photo editing.
Vector programs use math to describe shape and color. (i.e. a square is made of four points, each connected at 90 degrees) this makes for a certain "clean" look which may not always be appropriate, but offers smaller files in general, and infinite scalability. (A 4 inch square uses the same 4 points and angles as a 40 foot square.)
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The above posts have covered the topic pretty well, I'll just add a question - what do you three want your game to look like? If you can post an example image that you want to make something similar to, we can talk about how to make that type of art.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello,

I am a 2D and 3D artist working in the game industry.

I would recommend getting used to drawing on paper and also on a screen. When I am tackling very challenging lines, I draw on paper and transfer it to the 2D image by scanning into an image file and opening it in GIMP. Most of the time, I use my mouse to draw on the screen in GIMP. Eventually I want to get a drawing tablet to connect to my computer, but I have been getting by so far and making content for major production games and a simulation with my current methods.

Wacom drawing tablet is my goal by the end of the year so I can take it to the ultimate level and do very advanced 2D work. You might want to look at Zbrush, too, and see how you can interface a drawing tablet with the software. There are a bunch of other makes out there which might be in your price range and more comfortable for you.

Which software is best is purely a matter of preference.

Clinton Edited by 3Ddreamer
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It sort of depends on your capacity for creating currently, and whether you're doing Concepts and Designs or ingame assets.


If art isn't your forte I would just use paper and pencil and get some foundations laid. You may not be ready to invest in the frustration that is digital art.

If you can already draw I would suggest getting a cheap Graphics tablet, small would do for someone beginning on digital. When you first get it you should use it as your mouse until you can control it competently. This takes a bit, but is well worth it; probably one of the quicker ways to get used to how tablets work.

Drawing with the damn thing is an entirely different matter. I do not like GIMP but it's pretty much the only free image editing program that's actually free, so there's not much choice there.

For sketching I recommend[url="http://www.systemax.jp/en/sai/"] Paint Tool SAI[/url] (not free, but pretty cheap and very capable) and [url="http://firealpaca.com/"]FireAlpaca[/url] (free and has some great perspective tools!)
For painting, Painter/Photoshop are standard but... The prices are quite frankly out of control. You can modify SAI's brushes/textures a fair amount, and that can cover for the lack of features if you know what you're doing and as such turn it into a reasonably powerful painting software as well. If you don't need any editing frills and prefer to work with the slightly more realistic "painter" sort of feel, [url="http://mypaint.intilinux.com/"]MyPaint[/url] is pretty fantastic. And free.

But all of these just make your job easier in small ways. In the end it's the skill, knowledge and conceptual ability of the artist the makes the final piece.

In game assets are a little more difficult, and we'd need more information on what kind of game you're creating. Hope this helps somewhat, though. Edited by BagelHero
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the game determines the artwork required.
the artwork required determines the tools required.
the selection of tools is limited to those whose output you can use directly in the game or convert for use in the game. (IE file formats)

concept art:
your team is small, your project is likely of appropriate size for your team. paper and pencil will suffice to communicate art concepts between team members if and when required. they may also be useful when doing the actual drawing in a paint program. scan (or tablet) and edit (as mentioned in another reply) could be a time saver. as a lone wolf developer, about the only concept art i do is sometimes i do a quick sketch based on photos when i create a model. remember, you're trying to make a game, not a sketch portfolio.

artwork sources:
artwork will come from two possible sources: hand drawn, and edited photos. photoshop is considered one of the best for photos. paint.net + free clone stamp tool is a good zero dollar alternative. for hand drawing, you'll want to solicit the recommendations of sketch artists here. apparently its all about the brushes and tools available, and personal preference. hand drawn can also be done on paper and scanned.

for a 2d game:
you'll be making sprites, tiles, textures, bitmaps, and / or backgrounds in some paint program.

for a 3d game: you'll be making meshes in a modeler, and textures, sprites. etc in a paint program.

except possibly for handdrawn work, photoshop and something like 3dsmax is all one needs - well, and maybe a nice 3d paint program. special things may require special tools, but these two (a decent paint program and a decent modeler) will be your primary tools in game graphics development. a popular suite of tools is photoshop, 3dsmax, and unity game engine. paint.net, free clone stamp tool, and blender are less expensive options.

but really you have to shop first and foremost on file format. if you cant get it into the game (convert and load it), its no good. usually this isn't much of an issue for 2d. sometimes it is for 3d.

in your case, it sounds like your project is 2d. get the best paint program you can afford, possibly augment that with a second tool for hand drawing, and you should be set. figure out what you want your objects to look like (in your head, on paper etc), get with your coder and see what he needs (8 view sprites, top down, isometric tiles, menu backgrounds, etc) get as much info as possible (size limits, color limits, etc), then get to work! <g>.

Norm Barrows
Rockland Software Productions
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Norman Barrows' timestamp='1353097283' post='5001624']
the artwork required determines the tools required.
[/quote]

This is true except in the many cases where the artist desires to achieve one of many possible styles helped by using unconventional tools for a particular appearance in a work. Example is using cartoon tool which can be used for characters while the scene is in photo real textures around them.

In other words, artist preference can over ride any preconceived ideas about how the artwork should determine the tool used.

[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

Clinton
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"the artwork determines the tools required"

perhaps "the desired look or effect of the artwork determines the methods possible and therefore the tools" might be a better way to put it. as you say, there are a wide variety of looks to artwork achieved by a number of means and tools, from pencil to silicon graphics workstation.

my generalization of modeler and paint program is for the basic 2d / 3d stuff a beginning team might take on.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0