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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Yme

Good community / team / chat or anything really for newbies to collaborate on projects together?

19 posts in this topic

I am a self-taught coder. I feel what I need now is it to work with others on shared projects.I would prefer to communicate with other programmers/developers via vent, skype, or irc and get team experience.

Where would be some good places to start looking around? I am looking to volunteer for free.
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Hi, im in the same situation than you, if you want you can write me and talk about projects and start some sort of newbie team.

Seephirot.93@gmail.com
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I have also been looking for some hobbyist project. I'm quite new to game programming, but would like to contribute if the project is interesting. I'm currently working mostly with XNA. Feel free to contact me..
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cloakedabbot@gmail.com if anyone wants to e-mail me to either join team or start one.
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Hello,

if you're setting up a team, I can recommend you some software, that I've used for my personal and small projects.

VisualSVN Server - an easy to setup version control system for Windows. I'm using TortoiseSVN as client.
Trac - a collaboration, project management and wiki. There is a Version available that works with the Webserver that is installed by VisualSVN.

Good luck to all of you!
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Yme,

I have done a few group projects and for your version control I would strongly suggest GitHub. My teams have used CVS , SVN , and some less popular options and when we were finnally turned on to GitHub it became some much easier and had a lot less setup and management overhead just to get to the point of being able to version your code.

They let you have 1 repository for free. The only draw back to this is the fact the repo cannot be private. For a hobbyist and learning team this may not be so bad because it is easy to ask more experienced people to take a look at your code. GitHub also has a built in issue tracker, milestone system , and wiki. As well as unlimited collaborators.

I would also suggest mumble for any voice communications, to me it works a little bit better then vent but that is whatever flavor your into.

Just my .02 cents I hope it gives you some more things to consider and hopefully help you out a bit. Edited by RanBlade
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If you don't have your own server, RanBlade is probably right. It's much easier to use GitHub (really only 1 repo?), Sourceforge or whatever.

If you're running your own server already or you're in a local network it's not so hard to install your own version control system and you have much more control.
One more advantage is the with Trac you're getting milestones, tickets, timeline/roadmap, a wiki as well as web based svn-access.
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[quote]They let you have 1 repository for free.[/quote]
Huh. You can have more than 1 repo on github even with a free account. I currently have two and one of my friends has like 8 or something. Private repos are, however, only available for premium accounts (but trust me - nobody is ever going to find your repository unless you promote it anyhow). Edited by Bacterius
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You could also try bitbucket btw. That's what i'm using at the moment for a team environment. And it allows up to i think 5 private repos.
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On a side note I've used Google+ with their hangout feature to conference call with several of my friends.
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I'd be really interesting in getting together sometime and showing our little projects! :D rubikscuber999@gmail.com
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I'm also interested.
Know C++, Python, Javascript Edited by makuto
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You guys sure are eager to plaster your email addresses everywhere.

I'm not a moderator for these forums or anything, but I think it'd be best if you send your email addresses and talk about your projects in private messages. The replies of the thread are not for this: they're a public place where people will share their knowledge about the question in the post. If you want to gather people for a project or find a project to join, you're supposed to use the forum's Classifieds section, under the Hobbyist category (as mentioned by the first reply). If you want to offer help, send a private message.

Also, it's probably not a good idea to throw your email address around in public sites.
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I recommend you guys try to find someone who isn't a newbie to guide your project. Otherwise, you run the risk of having the blind leading the blind and risk project failure.
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