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Honestly... perhaps you should start with the artwork/game concept and team up with programmers with some experience to actually code the game. There are plenty of newbies that can program wanting to get involved with something on this site.

There is alot more to a game than the code. I've heard accounts from experienced game developers that code accounts for only 20% of the effort and level/art/concept the other 80%. You don't have to actually program to be a game developer. The programmer was hard core and believe coded the spiderman game engine. He also gave a talk at google I/O on the game he wrote for android, 'Replica island'.

I've developed a simple 2D mobile animation tool so i can work on animations on break at work or on the train. I've written no code for this game yet until i am happy with the set of animations i've developed for it will then write a level builder tool for scene compositing. And plugin the characters i've created.

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[quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1351994492' post='4997057']
[quote name='mholmes' timestamp='1351989994' post='4997036']
The new boston is a great site for video tuts
[/quote]

One of these days I really need to check out some of these tutorials.

I have heard, repeatedly, from people that are very good programmers, that these tutorials teach some extremely bad practices.
[/quote]

I tried to learn Java from him before and its terrible. He skips a lot of information that most books will cover and he never finishes any of his series. Their good if you wanted to look up something specific, but other than that stay away.

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I would first try to get up and running with the language of your choice. See how far you can get on your own, and then look at some relevant education.

For example, if one is learning C++, then just go buy a book on C++ and start mucking around in MS Visual C++ Express for a while. Then consider a relevant course in C++. Then go back to doing your own thing...then look for another course to improve your core programming skills...

...rinse and repeat. So one can teach themselves, but also get a push from some formal education. You'll find that learning any language need not be difficult...

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Before I start to the quote texts i would like to say that FINALLY I DECIDED the language and I decide for C#. *standing-ovation for the decision (because finally i decided what to study)*
Now...

[quote name='3Ddreamer' timestamp='1352080329' post='4997380']
Well, if that book is confusing you, then you probably should not work with C++ as a first language, in my opinion. Work very hard for a little while in the book. After a few days of hard effort in it, if it still is too confusing, then I would recommend other books or online internet tutorials of a very beginner level. Microsoft and many sites have beginner tutorials in C#, including this website:
[u]C# Workshop[/u]
[url="http://www.gamedev.net/forum/83-c-workshop/"]http://www.gamedev.n.../83-c-workshop/[/url]

Stay at the task! I had trouble too, so I know that you can do this. Focus! Work hard, but enjoy it!

Let us know in 2 or 3 days how it is going, okay?

Clinton
[/quote]

Okay, many thanks, i will check this tutorial out and i will study it.
Right now i'm studying C# on the book "C# 4.0 in a nutshell". It's a good book but i've got a little confused on a little thing....

[quote name='Animate2D' timestamp='1352151540' post='4997740']
Honestly... perhaps you should start with the artwork/game concept and team up with programmers with some experience to actually code the game. There are plenty of newbies that can program wanting to get involved with something on this site.

There is alot more to a game than the code. I've heard accounts from experienced game developers that code accounts for only 20% of the effort and level/art/concept the other 80%. You don't have to actually program to be a game developer. The programmer was hard core and believe coded the spiderman game engine. He also gave a talk at google I/O on the game he wrote for android, 'Replica island'.

I've developed a simple 2D mobile animation tool so i can work on animations on break at work or on the train. I've written no code for this game yet until i am happy with the set of animations i've developed for it will then write a level builder tool for scene compositing. And plugin the characters i've created.
[/quote]

Your reply to my topic is interesting.
I know coding it's not the main part of a game, but I sucks at drawing(is this the correct term?) on the paper...and I don't know if is the same on the computer...
I would like to have more information about this because i would like to do something about desing while i'm learning how to code.....
A lot of my friends told me would be better know both (coding and design)v[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/happy.png[/img]
[quote name='Anri' timestamp='1352203682' post='4997996']
I would first try to get up and running with the language of your choice. See how far you can get on your own, and then look at some relevant education.

For example, if one is learning C++, then just go buy a book on C++ and start mucking around in MS Visual C++ Express for a while. Then consider a relevant course in C++. Then go back to doing your own thing...then look for another course to improve your core programming skills...

...rinse and repeat. So one can teach themselves, but also get a push from some formal education. You'll find that learning any language need not be difficult...
[/quote]
I know but in the area near to my town there are no course, so i hope to study C++/Java/C# at university the next year.
Right now i can study it only by myself.... :| Edited by B.IOB

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Congradulations on a fine choice! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

Since you mentioned university, C# seems to me to be your best choice because your being a beginner. It is a very common language in the programming world in general as I wrote elsewhere. Good for you! You are being very reasonable at this crucial stage! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img] It is almost certain that you will learn other languages and C# is a fabulous one to start because it has so many similarities in itself to others and also the development environment is that way, too, for the most part.

Please don't call art work [i]design[/i]. Game design includes managing the art creation, but is much broader than just art. Some game designers do coding and some don't - such as my boss (He's a friend but I tease him by calling him "boss" [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.png[/img] ). Some game developers hire game designers to manage the designing of the game, managing the team or teams, and approve the art assets. Often the game designer creates some art, too, and may or may not do coding. It is also possible in theory for a game designer to not work at all with the artists but only design the gameplay features of the game. I know that the word design is thrown around the place here quite a bit, but I just want to encourage you to follow the big flow of things, yet realize that acceptions exist which make the words design and game designer tricky to use correctly at times.

As encouragement, you may start small and grow much in art if you can find your talent. I believe almost everyone has talent in some special area of the many kinds of art for games.

I am a 2D and 3D artist - semi-professional and part time - working in the industy and even [i]I[/i] would not recommend that you spend too much time on the art assets at this newbie stage. The coding is going to take years to reach the level of proficiency when you will be effective in all the basic aspects of your fantasy game that you want to make. I would say that a close encounter with the demand of art assets is coming, but you have at least several months of hard work before you feel it much.

For the next few months, a year, or more, you should progress in very ordered fashion starting with simple console programs, easy console games, and maybe simple 2D games in about a year or less. Understand completely each game and finish it well before going to the next. Use open source and no cost art assets for a while in place of your own if you need it, but cross that bridge when you come to it.

At this point, just make a few simple console programs, such as "Hello World", simple data base, letter display application, and others of the console genre.


Clinton

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Thanks, i'm glad to know that i make a good choise. I choosed the C# because is simpler than C++ but is powerful and i knew that it's needed to work with Unity....(that's one of my goal).
I hope to learn fast. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/rolleyes.gif[/img]

Sorry, I meant artwork and not design. I know, right now i'm focused on coding but i would like to see if my art vein is really dead or not :P
Obviusly, i will just learn artwork basics, right know , as i said, i would like to focus on the code.

Yeah, right know i'm "coding" that kind of program......:D
I'm confused a little bit, but not about Helloworld, that's simple. ^_^

I'm understanding i'll work really hard before reaching my goal....I only hope to be good with this... [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/unsure.png[/img] Edited by B.IOB

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