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auryx

What is a (Finite) State Machine? Why are they useful for game dev?

12 posts in this topic

EDIT:
There are some advantages in implementing FSMs as objects


Without objects your game might look like this
[source lang="cpp"]while(GameOn)
{
if(state==menu)
menu.doStuff();
if(state==setting)
setting.doStuff();
else if(state==scene1){
if(playerDead) playerdead.dostuff(); else scene1.doStuff();}
else if(state==scene2)
scene2.dostuff();
//and so on
}
[/source]Everytime you need to add a scene, you have to add your scene to this if-else list. It can get complicated if a state has a substate.
but with objects, your game loop will look like this
[source lang="java"]while(gameOn)
{
currentState.doStuff
}[/source]
You can change what currentState refers to when needed.
For example, when the game starts currentState can refer to MenuState. But when you press "play" button on the Menu screen, you can change your currentState refer to PlayState. Edited by lride
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[quote name='SiCrane' timestamp='1352048451' post='4997220']
[quote name='lride' timestamp='1352047883' post='4997215']
Without a finte state machine, your game loop might look like this
[/quote]
That's still a finite state machine. What you're talking about is the advantage of implementing a finite state machine with objects, not the advantage of having a finite state machine.
[/quote]
Thanks for catching my error. I didn't consider the definition of FSM
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Thanks SiCrane and Iride for the replies. So, to use your examples SiCrane, what is the benefit of actually doing it that way? Is it just a "different" way to approach the architecture of the game? Or does thinking about the game in that way provide real benefits in terms of efficiency or clear coding?

auryx
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A finite state machine is a quite general and abstract model for something whose behaviour can be described in terms of "states". There exists several different implementations and versions (they can be deterministic or not, they can be event based or not..). The use of FSMs is not motivated by efficiency or clear coding. These things depends on the specific implementation. FSMs are used because they can often model complex behaviours using a small and easy to understand description.
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Thanks Apatriarca, that's an excellent explanation. So it is essentially a modelling technique, I can understand that.

auryx.
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Can anyone show a pseudo-code example depicting a FSM-driven game loop and a non-FSM-driven game loop? I'm not 100% how the latter would look
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Another user linked me to [url="http://lazyfoo.net/articles/article06/index.php"]this[/url] a while ago. I think this will help solidify the concept, and show you a state machine in action in a simple game. Edited by EpicWally
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[quote name='auryx' timestamp='1352058534' post='4997272']
Thanks SiCrane and Iride for the replies. So, to use your examples SiCrane, what is the benefit of actually doing it that way? Is it just a "different" way to approach the architecture of the game? Or does thinking about the game in that way provide real benefits in terms of efficiency or clear coding?

auryx
[/quote]

To answer your question directly, efficiency of execution is not the point or intent of a FSM. FSM's are used to break down game logic into easily managable units for the human programmers. E.g., it's useful for making your code easier to read, easier to understand and easier to maintain. It has the added benefit of making bugs easier to find (part of the maintenance I mentioned).

EDIT: I see apatriarca already beat me to this description... ;) Edited by leeor_net
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Thanks for the reply anyway, leeor_net - it's still useful to get different people's perspectives on this!
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I want to take a shot at this. One, to try and help, and two, to be corrected if I'm wrong since I still consider myself a novice.

When I think of FSMs, I think of things like the previous posters have said, but I wanted to try and give a different visual to help you (hopefully not confuse you). For example, this is one path a user could take in a FSM:

[color=#008000][b]Splash Screen -> Main Menu -> MultiPlayer Menu -> Find Room -> Game Begins -> Pause (Player Quits) -> Multiplayer Menu (Player backs out) -> Menu Menu -> and so on. [/b][/color]

Now, Iride said something in his first post about a state having a subset. So, I will give you an example of some states I believe could have subsets, and those states would manage their own subsets.

[b][u]Subset 1: Main Menu (Which, remember, is being managed by some other FSM)[/u][/b]
[color=#b22222][b]Main -> Options (Player goes back) -> Main -> Help [/b][/color][b](Player goes back)[/b][color=#B22222][b] -> Main -> Multiplayer is clicked[/b][/color], which effects the manager taking care of Main Menu (My above FSM in bold-green).

[color=#008000][b]MultiPlayer Menu -> Find Room -> Game Begins -> Pause[/b][/color]

Maybe the pause menu can have its own FSM?

So, that is my answer. I tend to think of FSMs as managers, and I usually give them that type of name (StateManager, MenuManager, etc). I hope I was able to help.

If anyone thinks I don't know what I'm talking about, please correct me as it's always fun to learn!
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