• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
dtg108

First Person or Third Person?

9 posts in this topic

Hey guys, I was just wondering that if you were going to play a zombie survival (I know, so original) with a story, survival, and co-op mode, would you want it to be first person or third person? Why? Just trying to get ideas for my game.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3rd Person simply because I like it much more than FPS. ( <--- Refuse to play any HALO game cuz of that.)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Think about your controls and how the player is expected to interact with the world. What viewpoint the player prefers doesn't matter as much as making a good control scheme that your perspective works well with.

There are first person shooters with clunky controls and fickle contextual cues, and there's third person games with terrible camera work and poor aiming systems. Pick whatever works for the system you design - Players that might "refuse to play your game cuz of" your camera choice will balance out either way, so individual preference shouldn't really be a concern.

In general, first person is popular for ranged combat, and third person for melee or movement/acrobatics, so take a look at how players will be spending time in your game. Some first person games have an option to automatically switch to third when a melee weapon is equipped. You could even have a camera toggle so the player gets to decide what works for them, and when.

If you make a good game, with intuitive controls and a smooth interface, generally people will play it.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352065415' post='4997304']
Hey guys, I was just wondering that if you were going to play a zombie survival (I know, so original) with a story, survival, and co-op mode, would you want it to be first person or third person? Why? Just trying to get ideas for my game.
[/quote]First and Third person are very different when done right.

Third person games are great for interacting with the environment more. It's easy to wall crawl (stealth), and interact with ladders, do melee combat, cover shooting, etc eg: Dead Rising

First Person interfaces are great if you just need to be a floating camera with tunnel vision. You lose a lot of sensory and peripheral vision information, and it's better off if your interactions with the world, and other objects are kept simpler. eg Left 4 Dead
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Depending on the resources available to you, I'd say first person is easier to do well. Third-person requires some fancy character animations to make it atmospheric, for me, so if I'm going to be looking at a robotic little monster while I play your game, I'll prefer first-person to that. But if you've got the people and tools to make the character impressive, then by all means show it off.

In terms of gameplay, I tend to prefer third-person, since it lets me see where my feet are and what exactly is chewing on my neck, the sort of thing that would be intuitively obvious if I was actually there, but can be tough to show in first-person games, since there's no tactile feedback or peripheral vision.

For good feelings in a videogame, I have two features that I've become enamored of recently, and I hope you'll consider them:

In Minecraft, ArmA 2, and any other first-person game that allows it, I always try to max out the field of view. If I could go straight fish-eye and give myself 270 degrees of vision, I totally would. ArmA, in particular, has a great and simple way to switch between three different "zoom" levels, allowing me to hot-swap my FOV from about 40, 60, or 90 degrees with the press of a button. Whether I'm in first person or third, I find that incredibly powerful and handy. Running around, scanning the countryside, I'll zoom out and maximise my situational awareness. If I'm on a ridge watching a valley for signs of enemy activity, I'll focus right in on it and ignore my immediate surroundings. If I'm clearing a house or doing other normal stuff, the default zoom is fine. Great, great feature.

The other great feature I find in ArmA is the ability to look around independent of the direction I'm moving. It feels good and works smoothly, and I get a lot of use out of that feature. It makes me feel more like a person and less like either a disembodied camera or bipedal tank.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To me, first person can easily create a sense of claustrophobia and tunnel vision more so than third person (which is also partly why I dislike first person over third person). However, maybe in a zombie shooter game that feeling can be used to your advantage.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't think that first person increases the fear factor.
[i]Dead Space[/i] and [i]Alan Wake[/i] are wonderful examples of how a third person can still be scary.
If you do go the first person pov rout then you would be competing with games such as [i]Left4Dead[/i] and [i]Dead Island[/i] (Yikes!)

This all depends on your game, but I feel like there is more of a connection to the character in 3rd person, because you get to see them.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi, I actually asked a similar question although it is regarding first person melee combat games like Dead Island. The replies have great answers to your question.

http://www.gamedev.net/topic/633908-first-person-melee-games-why-do-these-games-use-1st-person-instead-of-3rd-person/

One more thing, you can always try Dead Rising (3rd person) and Dead Island (1st Person) and compare the two and see which one fancies you. Both have great melee combat with makeshift weapons.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey guys, my programmer made a package where you can choose between 1st and 3rd person, so problem solved :).
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0