• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Markus_Oljemark

What is important in a game engine?

6 posts in this topic

Hi,
I'm developing a game engine for my thesis and I would like to hear what you think is important in a game engine.
If you have a minute, I would really appreciate if you filled out the questionnaire at: [url="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dGk2S2oycVluUndrbE1xRTlUbDNoVWc6MQ"]link[/url]
Thanks!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just to let you know, I don't think your survey is well thought-out.
Example:
[quote]Built in editor
The game engine has a built in editor in which you can build levels visually.[/quote]
Scale: from "trivial" to "crucial".
No idea what "trivial" is supposed to mean in this context (i take for granted it means "irrelevant").

But the really scary thing is that you name "internal editor" over and over.
There has been a time in which having your own editor was considered cool.
Those times are long gone in my opinion.
Personally, I now think providing dedicated level editors are a sign of bad planning. Edited by Krohm
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not sure what you mean. All the popular commercial game engines have "internal editors" while the smaller, not so popular but yet very functional game engines might not have one. So I think it's relevant.

This survey is a pilot study for my thesis, the point with it was to find out how important people think platform compatability is in relation to the other aspects, since that is the topic of my thesis.

I also think you understand what trivial means in this context, you just like to complain on the internet.

Anyway, thanks for your time.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't understand either. If a game engine - especially a 3D one - is supposed to be used for a project with multiple people, how is having a visual editor of a sort NOT necessary? Sure, you can have everything built in 3DSM or Maya and just import the scene, but it'd be impossible to directly test game logic and the graphics within the game engine.

EDIT: obviously most of these things would be expected of a "real" commercial game engine, but I suppose you're asking more in terms of, which of these things should you focus on for your thesis, right? Edited by Lateralis
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Orujimaru' timestamp='1352368390' post='4998808']
All the popular commercial game engines have "internal editors" while the smaller, not so popular but yet very functional game engines might not have one
[/quote]Sorry but this is a gross over-approximation. The amount of functionality provided by - say - UnrealED is huge, yet most content is authored outside UnrealED itself.
Do your research, Collada is here exactly to solve the communication problem between different programs.
[quote name='Lateralis' timestamp='1352462987' post='4999245']
If a game engine - especially a 3D one - is supposed to be used for a project with multiple people, how is having a visual editor of a sort NOT necessary? Sure, you can have everything built in 3DSM or Maya and just import the scene, but it'd be impossible to directly test game logic and the graphics within the game engine.
[/quote]I don't understand what are you talking about. Even with an "internal" editor, such as UnrealED, which I consider the slickest around you don't test the logic directly. You run a compile pass and load it up. Those compiles can take hours... or might take a blink of an eye.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Lateralis' timestamp='1352462987' post='4999245']
If a game engine - especially a 3D one - is supposed to be used for a project with multiple people, how is having a visual editor of a sort NOT necessary? Sure, you can have everything built in 3DSM or Maya and just import the scene, but it'd be impossible to directly test game logic and the graphics within the game engine.
[/quote]I've worked on quite a few commercial games that worked that way. There's a lot of proprietary engines used by big companies besides Unreal/etc -- most companies have their own engine that you've never heard of, and will probably never see the toolchain for.
The last console game I worked on, Maya was used as the "level editor". In-game, you could write test/debugging tools in Lua so that you've got extra controls in-game -- e.g. mid-game I could pause the action and enable an IK GUI overlay that shows a whole bunch of rotation axis on the screen, or enable a menu for overriding AI actions, etc... We didn't have an "editor" for our engine at all, just a decent debugging layer built into the game, and a toolchain connected to our regular (non-engine-specific) art/programming tools.

Every engine worth it's salt support real-time reloading of game data and script-code these days anyway, so if you want to iterate on a texture, or some game logic, you just edit it in your art/programming tools, and the game updates on the fly while you're playing. Edited by Hodgman
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Hodgman' timestamp='1352539015' post='4999597']
I've worked on quite a few commercial games that worked that way. There's a lot of proprietary engines used by big companies besides Unreal/etc -- most companies have their own engine that you've never heard of, and will probably never see the toolchain for.
The last console game I worked on, Maya was used as the "level editor". In-game, you could write test/debugging tools in Lua so that you've got extra controls in-game -- e.g. mid-game I could pause the action and enable an IK GUI overlay that shows a whole bunch of rotation axis on the screen, or enable a menu for overriding AI actions, etc... We didn't have an "editor" for our engine at all, just a decent debugging layer built into the game, and a toolchain connected to our regular (non-engine-specific) art/programming tools.

Every engine worth it's salt support real-time reloading of game data and script-code these days anyway, so if you want to iterate on a texture, or some game logic, you just edit it in your art/programming tools, and the game updates on the fly while you're playing.
[/quote]
I didn't know that at all. Thanks! Edited by Lateralis
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0