• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
BobXIV

How would you make something like this?

15 posts in this topic

Recently I saw an Indi game named "Sui Generis" (here is a video of it http://kotaku.com/5958364/we-might-be-looking-at-the-next-generation-ofindie-rpgs), it seems very interesting. There are two things that are particularly interesting: the physic interactions, the animation of the characters.

My question is related to the characters animation. I want to ask how you can make something like this, I mean the movements seems very "physic driven" to call it some way. I know that Euphoria (http://www.naturalmotion.com/products/euphoria/) is a very good dynamic motion synthesizer, surely with that you can make something similar but this studio doesn’t seem to be very big so they most probably don’t have access to that kind of technology. May be the animations are simple made with Maya, 3D Studio, etc and they have a ragdoll and nothing else... but the result is very good.

What do you thing guys?
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd say your probably right, and likely using some sort of physics API to generate a smoother after effect, especially when the skeleton is destroyed. I have to say thats a pretty cool looking game, but its probably done the same way most of the physic based 3D games are, just with a difference camera angle is all.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They might be using homebrew 3d scanning techniques. They would set up dozens of cameras in front of a blue screen and piece them together to form a 3d model. Otherwise they would have spent years tweaking animations to get that kind of organic movement. I have a feeling that much of the physics is pre calculated and recorded from cg actors into a series of animations.

Otherwise they are using one heck of a physics engine.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='L. Spiro' timestamp='1352345902' post='4998728']
All-in-all, very practical to implement. Only the way the animation system runs needs to be modified, and that modification is trivial, since it is extremely easy to calculate what kind of impulse needs to be applied to get from one orientation to another over a fixed amount of time.
[/quote]

Could you explain how you would go about making those calculations? I'm considering implementing this and some other things...
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmmm... They're asking a LOT of money for a project of not well-known people. "We're... It doesn't matters really. Point is, we want a quarter million dollars please."

Though their project looks like it could require such amount of money, by that I mean it may be too ambitious. Edited by TheChubu
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does anyone know how to implement the physics collision at 00:59 in this clip:
https://www.youtube....h?v=PvZchE30StQ

It seems very accurate
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='ynm' timestamp='1353296840' post='5002231']
Does anyone know how to implement the physics collision at 00:59 in this clip:
https://www.youtube....h?v=PvZchE30StQ
[/quote]
[url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvZchE30StQ]Fixed that for you[/url]. That's just standard rigid body physics. Nothing special. [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=143k1fqPukk&feature=related]Pretty much any rigid body physics engine will do[/url], and even then [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KppTmsNFneg]there are more impressive things[/url]. Exactly how he auto-generated the collision mesh from the graphical mesh, I'm not sure, but there are various methods (assuming he generates a poly-reduced mesh; he could be using the full mesh, but for high-poly models that's computationally expensive).

@L. Spiro: how costly (CPU-wise) are such animation/physics combinations?
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can really only estimate, but the extra overhead shouldn’t be too much, especially since you can avoid divides (inverse of time is a constant for the whole frame and should only be done once per frame).
Standard performance tips apply: Since it is per-bone, if it is too heavy, reduce the number of bones etc. But compared to what has to be done to the bones involving matrix multiples etc., this extra overhead will likely go unnoticed, so overall I would just say, “Negligible”.


L. Spiro
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow, it is really amazing those animations and physics. I have never seen anything quite like it *_*

Another awesome thing is the illumination & shadows. The light blends really well with the environment (outside and indoor) and the shadows are very smooth and dynamic :)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='TheChubu' timestamp='1353294666' post='5002218']
Hmmm... They're asking a LOT of money for a project of not well-known people. "We're... It doesn't matters really. Point is, we want a quarter million dollars please."

Though their project looks like it could require such amount of money, by that I mean it may be too ambitious.
[/quote]
When it comes to middleware, it isn't the cost of THEM to develop it, what matters it the cost it would take for you or your project to implement the same functionality.

Could you implement the same thing, have it debugged, and have it available today, for less money?

Is it cheaper to use theirs --- which is available today at a known cost --- than it is for you to spend an unknown number of months re-inventing their wheel, debugging it, refining it, and supporting it, at an unknown cost? Edited by frob
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cool to have you stop by, Madoc. If you're able to, could you share any details of the physics system? I'd love to hear about it from the developer. I'll ask some specific questions, but if you're not able to answer them, no worries:
[list]
[*]How many rigid bodies can it currently support (on an average target user machine)?
[*]When it comes to importing the meshes to the physics system, are they converted to a low-poly version and fit with convex hulls?
[*]Any details you can share about the physics+animation combination would be cool.
[/list]
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='frob' timestamp='1353354399' post='5002422']
[quote name='TheChubu' timestamp='1353294666' post='5002218']
Hmmm... They're asking a LOT of money for a project of not well-known people. "We're... It doesn't matters really. Point is, we want a quarter million dollars please."

Though their project looks like it could require such amount of money, by that I mean it may be too ambitious.
[/quote]
When it comes to middleware, it isn't the cost of THEM to develop it, what matters it the cost it would take for you or your project to implement the same functionality.

Could you implement the same thing, have it debugged, and have it available today, for less money?

Is it cheaper to use theirs --- which is available today at a known cost --- than it is for you to spend an unknown number of months re-inventing their wheel, debugging it, refining it, and supporting it, at an unknown cost?
[/quote]I dont understand the point of your answer. They're not using middleware and I didn't mentioned it. Did you meant to quote somebody else?

Besides, as I said while its a lot of money, given the scope of the project it sure looks like they need it.

EDIT: Weird deja vu for some reason. Edited by TheChubu
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Elo again,

Pretty busy these days! I'll try to say something but going into any depth here would require a lot of time.

•How many rigid bodies can it currently support (on an average target user machine)?

Honestly we haven't really stress tested it, more than enough for our purposes. Probably in practice the most demanding thing is something that keeps the simulation fluid (no jittering and popping) and stable even when objects are put under impossible stress. Of course most of the time objects are resting and cost nothing.

What is still very demanding is cloth collision detection (you can see this on the cloak here www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPrOonmaG00). That's still going to need some clever optimisation.

•When it comes to importing the meshes to the physics system, are they converted to a low-poly version and fit with convex hulls?

Umm... To be honest this is something I'd rather not reveal while we're still so early in development with the game. We'd like to be able to use it first. I hope you understand.

•Any details you can share about the physics+animation combination would be cool.

Well, applying some forces to an articulated body is not a big deal but all you get is a body twitching awkwardly on the ground. Going from there to something that behaves like a character, that can maintain and recover balance, swing heavy weapons without falling over, get up from having fallen, run over rough terrain and do all sorts of other things is rather challenging. This needed a lot of procedural behaviours and basically a mountain of hacks, and the way it all interacts is the stuff of nightmares. A lot of the body is controlled almost purely procedurally and getting it to behave well in all circumstances has threatened to drive me insane. It's still a bit clumsy but I hope to improve it further, also with more predictive behaviours which have been somewhat neglected so far. I'm also looking to include more hand crafted solutions (i.e. for breaking or preventing a fall) which from the little I've picked up looks to be closer to how Euphoria works.

For some reason I still don't fully understand, I can't get traditional IK solvers to interact well with the system. I've tried this several times and just failed to produce anything that wasn't a bit twitchy (the people who made Euphoria are probably laughing at me right now). I have something that sort of does the job but it works in mysterious ways :).
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0