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dtg108

Good Weapons for Zombie Hordes?

14 posts in this topic

Hey guys, what do you think some good weapons would be for a zombie survival that aren't used much?
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That's what we're doing with our game. We are focusing more on "simulation" and less on "blow zombies heads off".
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Then focus more on the above than on what the specifics of the weapons are. It would be really great if the survivors had a "standard issue" weapon. Like a metal pipe with a big metal ball on the end and a retractable knife on bottom for finishing them off. Something unique and instantly recognizable. Or maybe different factions have their own weapons: One group uses machetes as standard issue, one uses night clubs and swarms the enemy, one group specializes in explosives, one group trains with knives. Each of these groups could manufacture their own weapons that would be unique.

Also, let me know if you need help with music and maybe sound. I'd like to talk with you if you think I could help.
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Chemical stuff: acid smoke to burn their eyes, their skin, reduce their "life" by degeneration, insect swarms, sprinkles, barbed wire, stuff to make them attach each other (probably by smell as human blood or sweat), stuff to disguise as them (by smell and looks)...

Make any form of physical contact a necessary avoidance, that even a spit of blood can condemn you, no melee attacks anymore.

Build had to get to hideouts for the survivors. Like the top of a building with all entrances blocked and you have to cross from another building on a thin surface and holding a rope to equilibrate and not fall, as zombies would always fall. It's also a weapon to keep luring them to such death. Edited by Luis Guimaraes
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Traps would be cool. Bear traps to catch them and eventually remove their leg. Pit falls to collect them to dispose of them more easily. Moats, acid pools (stolen from above), explosions (black powder jars and the such). You could have ingredients found in a house to make explosive, incendiaries, and smoke grenades. For example, fireworks could be pretty awesome for a more lighthearted moment.

If you're going for a sim, please do stay away from Chainsaws as a primary melee weapon.
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Just go with the best weapon for fighting a zombie hord, the one everyone should choose: a katana.

Disclaimer: no seriously it does not fit your simulation requirement but i'd really enjoy fighting zombies with a authentic katana :) Edited by NathanFR
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[quote name='dakota.potts' timestamp='1352337530' post='4998674']
they are becoming a trope of video games.
[/quote]
They are already THE trope of the last 5 years.

[quote name='dtg108' timestamp='1352339268' post='4998688']
We are focusing more on "simulation"
[/quote]
For a simulation you should take common items as weapon. Starting with a wooden table leg, some metal bars, a heavy pan, going over to tools like a fireaxe, sledge hammer etc. Make a walk through your local building center and take notes of what could be useful as weapon.

History is although a good way to learn about common weapons. Normal people in a war zone choosed often weapons which were powerful, yet easy to get (ie pitchfork, molotov cocktail).

And finally take a look at the major zombie games out there:
- dead rising: fun weapons
- dead island: melee weapons
- l4d: mix of melee weapons and guns
- day z: guns etc.
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The general concept of killing zombies is to aim for their "head", or really their brain. Because of this, most weapons have been originated around "precision fire" as such where you have to take your time to aim and line up for the shot to the head. Since this is a simulation, we're going to ignore all the zombie games that disregard the original concept that zombies can only be killed by destroying the brain.

Ashaman is onto something when he says "common items". You should be aiming for items that exist normally in houses or other areas. Pretend, for this instance, that this is not America. Guns are limited, rare, and probably all used by now. Which would make people think they would require to use only "melee weapons". Which is not true, things such as nail guns in households would be also used. What I'm trying to say is if your going for a simulation, you should be focused on making it so that most of the things around you are weapons.

You should also have only normal zombies at the start of the game, and have "mutations" occur as the game progresses. This will give the sense that you are fighting a living organism that is rapidly evolving.
I also remember a zombie game with the concept that wherever you were at the moment, you were able to board up the place and put up protection. Anywhere can be your safe area as such.
If your going to include NPC's as well, such as survivors, then you should be focusing on the "mistrust aspect". Survivors at the start will be very helpful and open, and willing to work together, but as the game progresses and they get betrayed/other various things happen then they become very cautious and won't team up with you.
Also, generally in zombie concepts there is what is known as the "Zombie-Human Detection System". This is where when you remain at a single place for too long, zombies will start to surround you. Also, making too much noise does the same affect.

I don't know if I said all I meant to, but its just a bunch of my thoughts to add to your "simulation". The main idea you should be looking at in your game, simply because it is a simulation, is "Realistically, would this happen?". It'll answer 9/10 of your questions, such as surviving without food for 10 months is realistically impossible.
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Not sure if this counts but what do you think of using the environment as your weapon? For example, I remember at one point in Half Life 2 that you could drop a car onto the zombies. You could try pushing a boulder or logs like in the Elder Scroll game to knock zombies down or elecrocute zombies with water like in Bioshock.
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