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james1231

Industry's look on tattoos etc.

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I'm currently studying to become a games developer/programmer and have a tattoo sleeve but due to it being around an inch above my wrist I can easily cover it up (long sleeved shirt etc.) if need be. also was thinking of having a flesh tunnel in one of my ears (around 5mm - not like it matters) what are the views upon these things in the games industry (employment wise) anyone who has been in the industry and knows about the policy.
All answers are greatly appreciated
Thanks. Edited by james1231

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It will most likely make you less desirable for some people and/or studios, compared to an unadorned human. Get the wrong interviewer and you might be racking up some negative points due to their personal opinions and ideals, even subconciously.

In general though, this industry tends to be quite used to strange-looking misfits. Just look at the people in an average art department and you'll see lots of strange stuff.

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Thanks for the reply Zao, I see where you're coming from with the wrong interviewer, i'm aware that there are 'flesh coloured plugs' which obviously take most of the distraction from them away if that would help when working/interview stages.

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I can only really repeat what was said above, but with some examples.
In my previous company a coworker had some of his tattoos removed to avoid trouble getting/maintaining a job.
On the other hand in my current workplace there are several people covered in tattoos, one guy with a bright-red mo-hawk and spiked collars, and a woman who wears neither bras nor shirts.
This basically just exemplifies what was already said about it being fairly random and entirely dependent on the company/interviewer.


L. Spiro

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I'm currently studying to become a games developer/programmer and have a tattoo sleeve but due to it being around an inch above my wrist I can easily cover it up (long sleeved shirt etc.) if need be. also was thinking of having a flesh tunnel in one of my ears (around 5mm - not like it matters) what are the views upon these things in the games industry (employment wise) anyone who has been in the industry and knows about the policy.
All answers are greatly appreciated
Thanks.


Depends on the company, but most game developers are pretty open-minded. As long as you don't flash gang tattoos and dress up in wife-beaters, you are fine.

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If this really worries you, prove your look is completely irrelevant.

If you're a programmer, start right now into Open Source, contribute actively. Get yourself noticed. Instead of going to interviews, make the interviewers come to you because you're good at what you do. Let them see your knowledge on architecture, rendering, game engine concepts, etc; exceeds that of an employee who graduated 5 years ago.

If you're an artist, start right now in building a portfolio, being in relevant sites (i.e. cgsociety, game-artist.net), participate in contests (i.e. Dominance War) etc. etc. Same rules apply as programmer. I'm a programmer, so of course I can give more examples.
Instead of going to interviews, make the interviewers come to you because you're good at what you do. Let them see you're not only really good, creative artist; but you're also familiar with the game dev. workflow: creating Havok collision bodies, modelling low poly, creating occlusion geometry, exporting process, that you know how important is to keep UVs & smoothing groups consistent across the triangle (so vertices don't get duplicated), etc etc

Cheers.

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Every art team I've seen has had at least one guy with tattoos visible in a t-shirt, in my experience in the webdesign, animation and games industry. Sure, there might be some stuffy people who think tattoos make an applicant worth less, but in my opinion they aren't very good human resource people then. Human resources should be on the lookout for people who will benefit the company, why should they deny someone who has a great portfolio or experience, just because he has a tattoo, earrings, weighs a trillion pounds or has long hair? Edited by Lateralis

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I've always been far too fickle to get a tatoo. I change desktop wallpapers every couple of days.

However, last time we did a round of interviews for a design position every. single. candidate. had either a visible tatoo or peircing. I had no discrimination one way or the other, if anything, I was feeling left out :)

We've a designer here right now with the most awesome sleeves I think I've ever seen IRL.
Just to echo what's been said above; it's a creative industry and creative people are, by and large, not normal - and that's why I love them and this industry :)

LPD

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Great reading this. Indeed, not all people think alike, and some of them will judge you badly. But in the end, I'm not sure I would want to work with them.

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