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Aus

Money making opportunities with Python game dev?

11 posts in this topic

The past few weeks I've been getting into Python and HTML a lot. I like them because they are easier than other languages I've attempted in the past. Problem is, if I sink several thousand hours into perfecting my Python skills...what do I have to gain from it? I don't plan on joining any big game or software companies ever - programming will always be an independent hobby for me. But if I can't even make a little money off of it I may just drop it for a different language altogether. For example: with flash games you can at least submit them to Newgrounds and Kongregate and other gaming sites and make ad revenue. You can do that with java games on some sites as well. C++ you can make phone apps to sell.....Python doesn't seem to have these opportunities that I know of?

Are any Python game programmers making money off of the games they've made? Any ideas how I can at least make a little profit off of the work I do in this language? I'm thinking long term here. I don't seriously expect to start cranking out AAA games by next month and selling them.
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Despite this thread's title, this is not a business post. It's a "from a mercenary perspective, which language/environment should I learn?" Which-language posts belong in For Beginners, so I'm moving this there.
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Hi,

Some people claim to be making some money in the video game genre with little or no investment cost other than their computer, so you might want to look at no cost software alternatives. I expect Python games to increase in number for the next several years and maybe beyond. If an AAA quality popular game made with Python enters the scene in the future, then I will not be surprised.


Clinton
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Python requires wrappers and/or [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsing"]parsers[/url] to function outside of the python environment.
The person above me mentioned Eve being coded in Python - they are correct to a point - the game scripts were written in Python, while the engine was written in C.
Just be aware that to create a custom Python program to operate on a phone, or embedded in a web page, your going to have to write or find a [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsing"]parser[/url] - usually in C, C++ ( I've seen some Python [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsing"]parsers[/url] written in Java )

Edit: If you wish to see games written in [b]PURE[/b] Python, please click [b][url="http://www.pygame.org/news.html"]HERE[/url][/b]. Edited by Shippou
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[quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1352571563' post='4999691']
Despite this thread's title, this is not a business post. It's a "from a mercenary perspective, which language/environment should I learn?" Which-language posts belong in For Beginners, so I'm moving this there.
[/quote]

I already picked the language. Regardless of the outcome of this topic I'm sticking with what I picked. I'm looking for a financial goal to aim for. Finances = business. But I wont tell you how to do your job.

Thanks for the posts everyone. Server of the Lord, thank you for the encouragement.

I [i]will[/i] be sticking with Python for the long-term and dabble in html for a website I own. I was just curious what money opportunities this language has overall.
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Money is poor motivation, as I explain in [url="http://www.gamedev.net/topic/632260-mobile-or-pc/page__p__4986688#entry4986688"]this post[/url].
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I'm not going to try to find your post in a separate thread. Feel free to explain why here.

Money is a great motivator for developing [i]any[/i] skill. I've I'm going to spend thousands of hours of my free time perfecting a skill I certainly hope I can generate a little money from it at some point even if that ends up being years down the road. Some people do not need money to motivate them. But I do if I'm planning on sticking with something for the long-haul.
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[quote name='Aus' timestamp='1352568383' post='4999678']...
[/quote]Programming is programming. No matter what language you use, you are becoming a better programmer and gaining experience. If you outgrow Python, or want to try something different, you can easily move from python to another language afterwards, and you'll only have to learn a few different rule and syntax changes.

The basics of programming don't change much. It's all memory management and flow control statements, to express an idea. You allocate some memory, you fill it with meaningful data, then you use loops to process it and hopefully get meaningful results. You only need to learn to program once. After that, you just learn languages.

Python is a very popular scripting language. It is used to script programs like Blender, 3DS Max, and the game engines Panda3D and Unity3D (a variant called Boo).
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[quote name='Aus' timestamp='1352676472' post='5000023']
I'm not going to try to find your post in a separate thread.
[/quote]
He linked directly to it.
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