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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Brody Doran

Looking for interview w/ designer or tester

5 posts in this topic

Hey! My name is Brody. I am currently going to school to become a video game designer(life dream). One of our assignments this term is to get an interview with someone in the field that we desire. So I am looking for a video game tester, or designer, who could answer these questions for me. I'm very eager to learn more for myself as well. Thanks for all your help.

QUESTIONS:
What training and education did you have that lead you to this career?

What other "paying your dues" positions did you hold?

How would you suggest that someone break into this field?

What is a typical entry level salary? are they any benefits?

What graphic arts skills are essential to being successful in this field?

What other skills or qualifications would help you get started?

What do you do all day, everyday?

What do you enjoy most about your work?

What produces the most stress?

Where do you see yourself going from here?

Do you work independently or as part of a team?

How do you get clients?



If you are unable to help, do you recommend any sites to visit that could offer an interview? Thanks again(:
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I'll answer them.
1): When I started, I didn't actually go into any "training", I just started looking things up, reading tutorials, etc. and it just got easier and easier as time went on.
2): Don't know what you mean, sorry.
3): If you like doing it, keep on going and don't stop.Also, start small.
4): That's hard to answer, as I'm not working for pay at the moment.
5): If you're a programmer, you don't really need much. But you will definitely have to hire someone or learn, as 3D art is what makes up the actual game.
6): You will eventually probably have to definitely learn some sort of programming, animating, or 3D art.
7): That really depends on what you're doing. If it's your full time job, then you do it all day. If it's a hobby, like me, then I usually spend a few hours a day working on it.
8): The feeling of achievement when you complete something big, even if no one will play it. (My terrible recreation of pong was my first project [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]).
9): If you have a team, it's definitely getting everyone together and putting everything together.
10): I hope to make this a full-time job eventually.
11): It depends on the size of the project. I'm working on a big one now, so I have a team.
12): I don't have clients, I just make games that I think people will enjoy playing.
Sorry if I didn't answer well, hope I helped! You can read my Developer Journal entries for more. Edited by dtg108
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Thanks for your feedback. If anyone else wants to fill out the interview then please do! my ideal candidate would be someone who has received pay for working on a title.
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By designer you mean game designer ? Or more of an artists, there are even software designers :) Level designer ?

Hope you find someone with industry experiences working in the fields you mentened, good luck.
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Here goes...
----------------------
[b]What training and education did you have that lead you to this career?[/b]
For good tester, understanding some coding helps, as well as understanding how to make some art assets enough to be able to make some fine looking graphics. So, get training or learning in some C++, HTML, Action Script, and other popular coding always helps. Similar thing for the arts side. Sketching, Photoshop'ing, Blender (or 3DMax and Maya), UDK, and such. For game designer, it's all above plus lots more. Degree in Collage helps. Could be in Communications, Fine Arts, Psychology, Human Behavior, Computer Science, etc etc so on and so forth. Get yourself in Internship really helps too.

[b]What other "paying your dues" positions did you hold?[/b]
[b]How would you suggest that someone break into this field?[/b]
3 best ways to break in, 1) Tester, 2 Level Designer, 3 Artist. As a Tester, it's usually easier to break in if you don't have lots of skills, but there are lots of other people doing the same thing as well, so you must be lucky. Also, it's mostly contract job, so it's not permanent, you will have to jump ships from one project to another. Until you have a few years of testing when you might be getting an in-house testing job with some companies. Level designer and artist will require more skills to get in, but usually once you are in, you are usually in for good, unless they fire you. For this to happen, get yourself a kickass portfolio. Work on indie project to get credit for your work. Once you are in for a few years, you might be able to move to Game Designer.


[b]What is a typical entry level salary? are they any benefits?[/b]
Could be ranging any where from $10/hr - $16/hr for Tester. No benefits usually. Or maybe some crappy health insurance. Artist and Level Designer could be making more.

[b]What graphic arts skills are essential to being successful in this field?[/b]

For Artist and Designer: Sketching, Drawing, screenshot mock-up creation, 3d modeling, character and environmental and hard-surface and organic and high poly and low poly and so on and so forth +.+

[b]What other skills or qualifications would help you get started?[/b]
University Degree !
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[quote name='PyrZern' timestamp='1353091298' post='5001598']
University Degree !
[/quote]
Yep, Math is a bitch, even when you tell it to get lost, it always comes around again in anything tech related.
If you want to be a game designer, knowing about usability, designing GUIs, getting feedback on it, etc. may be helpful. Those two fields have similar concepts and thought processes.

Do you know what a game designer actually does in a professional environment? I don't want to sound patronising, I wouldn't be sure myself ;).
Thinking back when I started going into IT, the first internship I applied was not in the field I am currently working in. It also wasn't what I imagined. As you, my dream was to make games. But since I live in a country with practically no game studios, I didn't even knew of different roles and what they include.
When you want to go into this industry, IT will be a big part of it. Don't make your future path too narrow, maybe you like something completely different in the field of Computer Science. Many laymen don't know that, you don't just "work in IT", there are many different jobs and with that, many different ways to have fun :D Edited by Bluefirehawk
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